ad_parkway_300x125.jpg

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

 

MLIVE

David Nicholson to join Wayne State Board of Governors

By The Associated Press

LANSING, Mich. — Gov. Rick Snyder has appointed businessman David Nicholson to the Wayne State University Board of Governors.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

U-M's new general counsel tells faculty his job is to represent the university and help it avoid risk

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan's recently hired general counsel met with faculty Monday and explained his new gig. "My job is to represent the university, to represent the regents, to represent the president and executive officers and, where appropriate, individual employees," said Timothy Lynch, who assumed U-M's top legal position Jan. 7. "To give my best judgement and advice regardless of who's asking the question, that's my job as general counsel."

 

USA TODAY

Best Value Colleges strive to cut tuition sticker shock

By Mary Beth Marklein

Their tuition sticker prices may look daunting, but many of the nation's most selective colleges and universities are producing graduates with student loan debt below national averages, according to affordability data from The Princeton Review released today.

 

Saturday-Monday, February 2-4, 2013

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University welcomes crowds to Engineering and Computer Science Day

ROCHESTER — Oakland University officials say they are seeing signs that young adults are interested in preparing to thrive in a more robust economic future.

 

MLIVE

GVSU to help prospective college students fill out financial aid forms

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Valley State University's Grand Rapids campus is one of more than 30 locations statewide participating in an event on Feb. 10 where prospective college students can get help applying for financial aid.

 

Winter semester enrollment down at Grand Rapids Community College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Enrollment at Grand Rapids Community College fell by 2.3 percent this semester, a decrease administrators attribute to an improving economy that has caused some residents to pursue a job rather than an education.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

A Million Strong: Helping Them Through

By JAMES DAO

THE class was humanities, the book under discussion Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” Suddenly an alarm blared and 20 students, some calm and some not, filed out of the makeshift classroom. Kandahar Airfield in southern Afghanistan was under rocket attack, again.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Pleas intensify for more college aid

By Kim Kozlowski

Aditya Sathi pays $12,800 annually in tuition as a full-time University of Michigan student. If he had attended the university 10 years ago, his bill would have been $7,224 — or almost half of that.

 

University Research Corridor a worthy investment

By Lou Anna K. Simon, Mary Sue Coleman and Allan Gilmour

At a time when Michigan's leaders are working hard to guarantee they're getting the best return on the public's tax dollars, a recent study shows that Michigan's University Research Corridor (URC) is a good place to invest.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Multimillion dollar bike-sharing program planned for University of Michigan and downtown Ann Arbor

By Kellie Woodhouse

The Ann Arbor-based Clean Energy Coalition is developing a bike-sharing program throughout the city, including on University of Michigan's sprawling campus near downtown.

 

Friday, Feb. 1, 2013

 

MLIVE

Hundreds of students attend faith and international development conference at Calvin College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Hundreds of students are gathered at Calvin College today for a student-run conference that examines international development from a faith-based and social justice perspective.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

WSU faculty union seeks 10-year contract before right-to-work takes effect

By David Jesse

Wayne State University’s faculty union wants to insert a 10-year provision into its contract to ensure it will continue to collect dues from faculty members even after the right-to-work law goes into effect this spring, according to a memo sent to union members earlier this month.

Related story:

> Detroit News: WSU faculty wants deal before right to work starts

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

For Chinese studying in US, graduating into an uncertain future

By Winnie Yeung

It’s Saturday night, and Wei, a senior majoring in economics and math, is having pizza and French fries with his American roommates in the dining hall of a prestigious liberal arts college in New England. Soon they head out to watch football, then to a frat party.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Study Confirms College Endowment Drop

By TAMAR LEWIN

On average, investment returns on college and university endowments declined by 0.3 percent in the last fiscal year, a sharp drop from the average return of 19.2 percent in fiscal 2011, according to a study by the Commonfund Institute and the National Association of College and University Business Officers, known as Nacubo.

 

My Valuable, Cheap College Degree

By ARTHUR C. BROOKS

MUCH is being written about the preposterously high cost of college. The median inflation-adjusted household income fell by 7 percent between 2006 and 2011, while the average real tuition at public four-year colleges increased over that period by over 18 percent.

 

Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013

 

DETROIT NEWS

WSU faculty wants deal before right to work starts

By Kim Kozlowski

Wayne State University's faculty union is seeking a 10-year contract before the state's right-to-work law goes into effect at the end of March, union leaders said Wednesday.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

New University of Michigan provost considered 'visionary' by peers

By Kellie Woodhouse

On Tuesday she sat in the back of a crowded faculty meeting as University of Michigan Provost Philip Hanlon talked about college affordability. Every once in a while, the outgoing provost would toss a question he couldn't answer to her, and she'd clarify.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Law Schools’ Applications Fall as Costs Rise and Jobs Are Cut

By ETHAN BRONNER

Law school applications are headed for a 30-year low, reflecting increased concern over soaring tuition, crushing student debt and diminishing prospects of lucrative employment upon graduation.

 

Off Off Off Campus

By ABIGAIL SULLIVAN MOORE

ON any given Saturday, Central Connecticut State University is nearly empty. No Frisbee flinging, no lingering over lattes at Jazzman’s Cafe and Bakery. The library closes at 3:45, the cafeteria at 6:30 sharp.

 

Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013

 

MLIVE

Central Michigan University medical school reaches 80 percent of $25 million fundraising goal

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — The Central Michigan University College of Medicine has only a few million more dollars to raise.

 

Lansing Community College spring semester enrollment declines

By Justine McGuire

LANSING, MI --  Lansing Community College's spring 2013 enrollment is down from a year ago, but that's no surprise to administrators.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Hybrids, solar panels and trashing trash: A look at University of Michigan sustainability progress

By Kellie Woodhouse

Since University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman introduced ambitious sustainability goals 16 months ago, many practices have started to change at the school but there's even more left to do.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Credit for Internships: Is It Due?

By KEVIN CAREY

JOB listings on Craigslist these days are full of companies looking for young people willing to work for no salary. In New York, internships are available at businesses ranging from advertising agencies in midtown to a “cake studio” in Brooklyn. They want people who are “positive” and “energetic.” And one more thing: they want college students. As one agency looking for an unpaid videographer put it, “PLEASE NOTE: You must be in school and receive school credit in order to join us.”

 

Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan presence growing on Chinese social networking website Weibo

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan is growing its presence on the Chinese social media website Sina Weibo. The school has more than 5,000 followers on its Weibo account, according to an Inside Higher Ed article.

 

MLIVE

UM-Flint nursing graduate program called third best in nation

By Blake Thorne

FLINT, MI -- The online graduate program for nursing at the University of Michigan-Flint was recently called third best in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. UM-Flint was topped on the list by only Ferris State University in Big Rapids and Lamar University in Texas.

 

Financial Times ranks Michigan State Broad College of Business MBA program best in U.S., No. 2 globally for placement success

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- For the second year in a row, the Michigan State University Broad College of Business' full-time MBA program is the best in the country, and second-best in the world, for placement success, according to Financial Times.

 

GRCC board gives the 'OK' to develop differential tuition rate for dual enrolled students

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Trustees at Grand Rapids Community College on Monday unanimously approved a proposal to develop a differential tuition rate for high school dual enrolled students, a move administrators say will make it more affordable for school districts to enroll students in college-level classes.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Bucknell discloses SAT score inflation

By Nick Anderson,

Bucknell University has disclosed that for several years it reported inflated SAT scores for incoming freshmen, making the private Pennsylvania liberal arts school the latest school to acknowledge providing faulty data to analysts who rank colleges.

 

Saturday-Monday, Jan. 26-28

 

MLIVE

Jackson Community College enrollment continues to drop, as 12.5 percent fewer students take winter classes this year

By Leanne Smith

JACKSON, MI – Roughly 12.5 percent fewer students are taking classes this winter at Jackson Community College compared to a year ago, keeping the college’s enrollment numbers at 2006 levels.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Former home of Flint Journal to be leased by MSU

Associated Press

FLINT, Mich. — Michigan State University’s future includes expanding into a piece of Flint’s past. Officials with the East Lansing-based school have voted to lease part of the downtown Flint building that was the longtime home of The Flint Journal. The vote Friday by Michigan State’s Board of Trustees authorizes the university to pursue leasing 40,000 square feet for its College of Human Medicine’s growing public health program.

 

U-M student is driven to succeed and help others on the way

By Rochelle Riley

If you want more proof -- living proof -- that Detroit's auto companies are back, consider Donovan Colquitt. Donovan knows cars. He knows Michigan. What he plans to know by the time he completes his mechanical engineering studies at the University of Michigan is energy.

 

New regents learn balance between their goals, universities' needs

By David Jesse

When Ann Arbor attorney Mark Bernstein ran for election to the University of Michigan's Board of Regents last fall, he drove an old school bus all around the state, outlining a host of ideas for the university.

Related story:

> Detroit Free Press: Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder's appointees step into their new role on college boards

 

DETROIT NEWS

CCS students design for future

By Serena Maria Daniels

Detroit — Take a look around the North American International Auto Show and you'll find the latest in hybrids and electric vehicles, in-dash technology and sexy sports cars.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland Community College reorganizes to fit student needs

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland Community College is embarking on a move to reorganize its operations and assess its programs to ensure they meet the needs of the near-29,000 students and the community.

 

MLIVE

Mercantile Bank CEO announces $100,000 gift to Upward Bound during State of the City

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A program aimed at helping students from Grand Rapids Public Schools transition to college received a financial boost today during Mayor George Heartwell’s State of the City address.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan to offer limited gender-neutral housing

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan housing will set aside a block of gender-neutral rooms for transgender and gender non-conforming students in fall 2013.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

$1.1 Billion in Thanks From Bloomberg to Johns Hopkins

By MICHAEL BARBARO

BALTIMORE — He arrived on campus a middling high school student from Medford, Mass., who had settled for C’s and had confined his ambitions to the math club.

 

WASHINGTON POST

‘Irrational exuberance’ over MOOCs

By Larry Cuban

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan said in 1996 that the high-flying stock market was an instance of “irrational exuberance.” Nearly two decades later, were he so inclined  to inspect the swift expansion of elite universities into sponsoring Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), he might have said pretty much the same thing.

Related story:

> New York Times: Davos Forum Considers Learning’s Next Wave

 

WALL STREET JOURNAL

College Planning: A Crash Course on Paying the Bill .

By EMILY GLAZER

The good news: Junior got into college. The not-so-good news: It's going to cost you. It's time for the annual ritual when families fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, wait for the aid letters to roll in and then sit down to decide which school is "the one." And in many cases, the final price tag can trump a great curriculum, sprawling campus and renowned professors.

 

Friday, January 25, 2013

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Danialle Karmanos to resign from WSU Board of Governors

By David Jesse

Wayne State University Board of Governors member Danialle Karmanos will resign from the board on Feb. 1, the school announced today. She began her eight-year term on Jan. 1, 2011.

 

MLIVE

Steelcase board member once again appointed as GVSU trustee

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Kate Pew Wolters’ time on the Grand Valley State University Board of Trustees doesn’t appear to have come to an end after all.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan to hire social media 'thought leader' after 1st director resigns due to inaccurate resume

By Kellie Woodhouse

A month after its first social media director abruptly resigned amid an inaccurate resume, the University of Michigan is looking to fill the position again. The Ann Arbor school posted an opening for a social media director on its job postings website Wednesday.

 

PORT HURON TIMES HERALD

Colleges get fewer winter students

By Beth LeBlanc

In the past two years, Lyndsey Wiegand has changed her major about four times. The St. Clair County Community College sophomore has selected pyschology as her major — but she’s relieved to attend a college that doesn’t charge too much for indecision.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs

By KEITH BRADSHER

GUANGZHOU, China — This city of 15 million on the Pearl River is the hub of a manufacturing region where factories make everything from T-shirts and shoes to auto parts, tablet computers and solar panels. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits.

 

HUFFINGTON POST

Fairness For Struggling Students Act Would Reform Private Student Loan Bankruptcy Rules

Three U.S. Senators unveiled legislation Wednesday to reverse a 2005 change in bankruptcy laws that makes it nearly impossible to have private student loan debt discharged.

 

Thursday, January 24, 2013

 

MLIVE

ArtPrize founder Rick DeVos discusses Kanye West and why college is ‘oversold’

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Rick DeVos has a knack for big ideas. Two of them – ArtPrize and Start Garden – have helped infuse Grand Rapids with a creative and entrepreneurial spirit. But as it turns out, DeVos has some interesting thoughts on higher education as well.

 

Snyder appoints Blue Cross, Blue Shield vice president to Central Michigan Board of Trustees

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — A 1993 Central Michigan University graduate may serve on the school's board of trustees.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Leader of University of Michigan's Flint campus to step down in 2014

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan's Flint campus chancellor will step down in August 2014. U-M President Mary Sue Coleman is expected to convene a search committee for Ruth Person's replacement this summer.

 

University of Michigan Library receives $1.25M grant to create endowed position

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan has been awarded $1.25 million to create an endowed librarian position.

 

Multibillion-dollar economic impact of Michigan's 3 research universities expected to keep 'growing and growing'

By Kellie Woodhouse

Michigan's three top public universities don't simply educate tens of thousands of students, they also spread billions of dollars throughout the state's economy each year.

 

ATLANTIC

How America's Top Colleges Reflect (and Massively Distort) the Country's Racial Evolution

By Derek Thompson

In the last 30 years, the country has become steadily more racially diverse -- and so have many American colleges. In 1980, more than 80% of the country was white, and whites accounted for about eight in ten students at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. Today, less than 65% of the country is white, and it's non-whites who now account for a majority at all three of those institutions.

 

EDUCATION WEEK

Colleges Overproducing Elementary Teachers, Data Find

By Stephen Sawchuk

Though universities' economics departments preach the gospel of supply and demand, that principle is not always followed when it comes to their education departments.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

To Raise Graduation Rate, Colleges Are Urged to Help a Changing Student Body

By TAMAR LEWIN

In an effort to improve the college completion rate and fend off new regulations, a commission of the nation’s six leading higher-education associations is calling for extensive reforms to serve a changing college population — one increasingly composed of older and part-time students.

Related story:

> Washington Post: College leaders: Focus on ensuring students get degrees

 

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

 

DETROIT NEWS

Michigan's University Research Corridor had $15.5B economic impact

By Kim Kozlowski

Michigan's University Research Corridor, an alliance of the state's three largest universities, is growing in several areas, including a $15.5 billion economic impact on the state, according to an annual report to be unveiled Wednesday.

Related story:

> Detroit Free Press: Michigan Research Corridor generates jobs and $15.5B in economic impact, study finds

 

EDUCATION WEEK

Colleges Overproducing Elementary Teachers, Data Find

By Stephen Sawchuk

Though universities' economics departments preach the gospel of supply and demand, that principle is not always followed when it comes to their education departments.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Public Universities to Offer Free Online Classes for Credit

By TAMAR LEWIN

In an unusual arrangement with a commercial company, dozens of public universities plan to offer an introductory online course free and for credit to anyone worldwide, in the hope that those who pass will pay tuition to complete a degree program.

 

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

 

MLIVE

UM-Flint selects new Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

By Blake Thorne

FLINT, MI -- The University of Michigan-Flint has named a new assistant vice chancellor for students affairs. Michelle Rosynsky will work with Vice Chancellor Mary Jo Sekelsky.

 

Michigan State gets $1 million from MSUFCU for new jazz studies program

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Thanks to a $1 million gift from MSU Federal Credit Union, Michigan State University's College of Music will launch a new jazz studies artist-in-residence program.

 

DETROIT NEWS

State fails higher education test

By Daniel Howes

The charts are sobering. There, in stark type, stands a picture of Michigan that doesn't bode well for a state trying to break from the dysfunction of its past and embrace the promise of a growing, better-educated 21st-century future.

 

Oakland University scholarship winners honored for emulating Dr. King

By Kim Kozlowski

Rochester — Life's most urgent question: What are you doing for others? That was asked by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Oakland University President Gary Russi reminded hundreds of attendees Monday at the 21st annual Keeper of the Dream Scholarship Awards Celebration to honor King's legacy.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Lawrence Technological University President Virinder Moudgil receives distinguished alumnus award

Lawrence Technological University President Virinder Moudgil received the distinguished alumnus award from Banaras Hindu University recently.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan faculty beat: Retaining and wooing stars requires constant vigilance

By Kellie Woodhouse

Losing star faculty is a blow to the gut, and most universities will go far to keep their favorite teachers and researchers. Think of star faculty as in-demand athletes.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

New Cornell Technology School Will Foster Commerce Amid Education

By ARIEL KAMINER

Their curriculum devotes months to helping a company solve a current technological challenge. Their progress is supervised not just by an academic adviser, but also by an industry adviser. Their vast campus on Roosevelt Island, when it is built, will intersperse classrooms with office buildings, where high-tech companies can rent a suite and set up shop.

 

Saturday-Monday, January 19-21, 2013

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University names associate vice president of communications and marketing

John O. Young, former vice president at Northwood and Walsh College, has been named associate vice president of communications and marketing. The announcement was by OU’s Vice President for Development, Alumni and Community Engagement Eric Barritt. Young, of Midland, was most recently vice president of marketing for Northwood University and prior to that, he served as vice president and chief marketing, enrollment and government relations officer at Walsh College.

 

Oakland University honors Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with 21st Keeper of the Dream Scholarship Awards

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland University will honor civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy Monday, Jan. 21 at the 21st annual Keeper of the Dream Scholarship Awards Celebration at 11:30 a.m.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Among University of California Applicants, Latinos Take the Lead

By TANYA ABRAMS

As colleges continue to review — and tally — the thousands of applications that have poured into their admission offices this school year, a demographic milestone has cropped up in California.

 

Friday, January 18, 2013

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan program putting college in reach for Michigan foster children

By Chris Andrews | Bridge Magazine

Western Michigan University sophomore Nikki Jenks is intent on beating the odds. Young people who spend years in foster care, as she did, are unlikely to make it to college, let alone graduate. Jenks bounced from home to home, peninsula to peninsula, school to school, and relative to stranger. At one point, she thought a likely career option was stripper.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

U-M researchers work to develop computers of 2025

By The Associated Press

Researchers affiliated with a new $28 million research center led by the University of Michigan will work to design the computers of 2025.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Dartmouth Stops Credits for Excelling on A.P. Test

By TAMAR LEWIN

Concerned that Advanced Placement courses are not as rigorous as college courses, Dartmouth has announced that it will no longer give college credits for good A.P. scores, starting with the class of 2018.

 

Measuring the Success of Online Education

By JOHN MARKOFF

One of the dirty secrets about MOOCs — massive open online courses — is that they are not very effective, at least if you measure effectiveness in terms of completion rates.

 

Make Law Schools Earn a Third Year

By DANIEL B. RODRIGUEZ and SAMUEL ESTREICHER

TODAY, leaders of the New York bar, judges and law school faculty members will gather at New York University to discuss a proposed rule change. If adopted by the state’s highest court, it could make law school far more accessible to low-income students, help the next generation of law students avoid a heavy burden of debt and lead to improvements in legal education across the United States.

 

Thursday, January 17, 2013

 

MLIVE

Central Michigan University's Alternative Breaks program ranked among top 5 in nation

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan University's Alternative Breaks program is one of the top in the country. Break Away, a national nonprofit organizations that supports alternative breaks, ranked CMU fifth for the most trips coordinated by a school and fourth for the number of students participating.

 

Central Michigan University online business program ranks 6 nationally in U.S. News Report

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan University's online graduate business program is one of the top in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report. The report ranked the program sixth out of 213 schools that offer online graduate business programs.

 

Health care oriented for-profit college Sanford Brown preparing to close its doors in Kentwood

By Brian McVicar

KENTWOOD, MI -- A health care focused private, for-profit college in Kentwood is phasing-out operations, with the campus expected to shut its doors permanently by 2014.

 

Western Michigan program putting college in reach for Michigan foster children

By Chris Andrews | Bridge Magazine

Western Michigan University sophomore Nikki Jenks is intent on beating the odds. Young people who spend years in foster care, as she did, are unlikely to make it to college, let alone graduate. Jenks bounced from home to home, peninsula to peninsula, school to school, and relative to stranger. At one point, she thought a likely career option was stripper.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Tuition to go up at Macomb Community College

By David Jesse

Tuition will be going up next year for students at Macomb Community College. The Board of Trustees approved a $3 increase in the cost of tuition per credit hour, to $89, for resident students on Tuesday.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Lawrence Tech projects on display at Auto Show

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Lawrence Technological University student Colin Bonathan’s 2025 rally car is among the LTU projects on display at the 2013 North American International Auto Show that opens to the public on Saturday, Jan. 19.

 

BATTLE CREEK ENQUIRER

Undocumented immigrants get KCC tuition break

By Justin A. Hinkley

College will be more affordable for local undocumented immigrants after Kellogg Community College changed a longstanding policy that asked them to pay more than twice as much in tuition as other students.

Related story:

> New York Times: Democrats in Albany Propose Giving Illegal Immigrants Access to Aid for College

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Next Made-in-China Boom: College Graduates

By KEITH BRADSHER

SANYA, China — Zhang Xiaoping’s mother dropped out of school after sixth grade. Her father, one of 10 children, never attended. But Ms. Zhang, 20, is part of a new generation of Chinese taking advantage of a national effort to produce college graduates in numbers the world has never seen before.

 

At Many Top Public Universities, Intercollegiate Sports Come at an Academic Price

By TAMAR LEWIN

Public colleges and universities that compete in N.C.A.A. Division I sports spend three to six times as much on each athlete as they do to educate each of their students, according to a new report by the Delta Cost Project at the American Institutes for Research.

 

Moody’s Gives Colleges a Negative Grade

By ANDREW MARTIN

The credit reporting agency Moody’s said on Wednesday that it had revised its financial outlook for colleges and universities, giving a negative grade to the entire field.

 

Clarity and Confusion From Tuition Calculators

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

The annual ritual of college admissions has shifted from the season of applying to the season of waiting. While that means an anxious vigil for millions of teenagers like Zachary Ewell, it goes double for their parents. Heidi and Mike Ewell must wait not only to learn where Zachary will go, but also how many thousands of dollars they will have to pay.

 

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Students across Michigan sign up for 'Sugar Daddies' to help pay for college

By David Jesse

There’s no flipping hamburger, serving drinks or answering phones to make enough money to pay for college for several hundred Michigan students. Instead of more traditional jobs, they are turning to “Sugar Daddies” to help pay the climbing costs of college, according to SeekingArrangement.com, which bills itself as the world’s largest Sugar Daddy web site.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Clarity and Confusion From Tuition Calculators

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

The annual ritual of college admissions has shifted from the season of applying to the season of waiting. While that means an anxious vigil for millions of teenagers like Zachary Ewell, it goes double for their parents. Heidi and Mike Ewell must wait not only to learn where Zachary will go, but also how many thousands of dollars they will have to pay.

 

USA TODAY

Division I schools spend more on athletes than education

By Mary Beth Marklein

Public universities competing in NCAA Division I sports spend as much as six times more per athlete than they spend to educate students, and likely for the first time per-athlete spending at schools in each of the six highest-profile football conferences topped $100,000 in 2010, an analysis of federal and school data finds.

 

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

 

MLIVE

Longtime economics professor John Reifel named interim dean of GVSU's business school

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Longtime economics professor John Reifel has been named interim dean of Grand Valley State University's business school, administrators announced Monday.

 

DETROIT NEWS

University of Michigan's Coleman to visit India

By Associated Press

Ann Arbor — University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman will visit India to promote the Ann Arbor school's global identity and strengthen ties with alumni in that country.

 

MSU Union marks finished renovation with ceremony

By Associated Press

East Lansing — Michigan State University is celebrating the renovation of its union with a ceremony and tours.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Parents’ Financial Support May Not Help College Grades

By TAMAR LEWIN

Parents saving for college costs, take heed: A new national study has found that the more college money parents provide — whether in absolute terms or as a share of total costs — the lower their children’s college grades.

 

Saturday-Monday, January 12-14, 2013

 

MLIVE

Small business center, housed at Grand Valley State University, receives $3.3 million in renewed funding

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A Grand Rapids-based nonprofit group focused on providing consulting and educational services for businesses throughout Michigan received $3.3 million in “continuation” funding from the U.S. Small Business Administration.

 

Neighbors peeved by Kalamazoo College chopping down trees for Arcus Center

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Some residents in the West Main Hill neighborhood are mourning the loss of aged trees which were removed to make way for the new Kalamazoo College Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, being constructed at the corner of Academy and Monroe streets.

 

West Michigan colleges share strategies to reduce mounting student debt

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- As student debt continues to climb, administrators at West Michigan colleges and universities say they’re eyeing ways to keep higher education affordable, from boosting scholarships to helping students better understand financial aid.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

U-M Provost Philip Hanlon addresses Ivy League college he will soon lead

By Kellie Woodhouse

Philip Hanlon will be leaving University of Michigan —where he serves as provost, chief academic officer and chief budgeter— this summer to lead his alma mater Dartmouth College.

 

Eastern Michigan University president re-appointed to Michigan Education Trust board

By Kellie Woodhouse

Eastern Michigan University President Susan Martin has been re-appointed to the Michigan Education Trust board of directors.

 

University of Michigan sees uptick in early applications

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan is seeing an uptick in early applications for undergraduate admission. According to The Michigan Daily, the school had released roughly 22,000 decisions on early applications by Dec. 24, an increase of 3,000 from the year before.

 

Friday, January 11, 2013

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan regents to forgo public meeting for California trip

By Kellie Woodhouse

The "strategic planning session," as the two-day meeting is being called by the university, will take place Jan. 17th and 18th in Los Angeles at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza hotel.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Downturn Still Squeezes Colleges and Universities

By ANDREW MARTIN

An annual survey of colleges and universities found that a growing number of schools face declining enrollment and less revenue from tuition.

 

Thursday, January 10, 2013

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Colin Powell to speak at Central Michigan University

Associated Press

Retired Gen. Colin Powell will speak at Central Michigan University as part of the Mount Pleasant school's annual celebration of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

 

MLIVE

Scott Boerma, UM marching band director, calls new job at WMU a 'blessing'

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Scott Boerma says accepting a job as Western Michigan University Director of Bands is a blessing.

 

Grand Valley State University among top finishers in national recycling competition

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- When it comes to diverting waste from landfills, students at Grand Valley State University have reason to be proud.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Benefits of College Degree in Recession Are Outlined

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Young adults have long faced a rough job market, but in the last recession and its aftermath, college graduates did not lose nearly as much ground as their less-educated peers, according to a new study.

 

Generation LGBTQIA

By MICHAEL SCHULMAN

STEPHEN IRA BEATTY, a junior at Sarah Lawrence College, uploaded a video last March on We Happy Trans, a site that shares “positive perspectives” on being transgender.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Concordia University to add accelerated learning centers in Frankenmuth and Dearborn

By Erica Hobbs

Concordia University Ann Arbor is expanding its programs to target working adults in different parts of the state. The private Christian university is creating an accelerated learning center in Frankenmuth and Dearborn, as part of its merger with its sister school, Concordia University Wisconsin. The expansion follows the model of Concordia University Wisconsin, which currently has 10 accelerated learning centers in Wisconsin.

 

University of Michigan taps insider Mark West to head law school

By Kellie Woodhouse

Mark D. West, the school's current associate dean for academic affairs, has been tapped to lead the school, which was recently ranked the 10th-best law school in the country by U.S. News and World Report.

 

Solar panel installation on University of Michigan property off Plymouth Road irks nearby residents

By Kellie Woodhouse

Hundreds of solar panels installed on University of Michigan property on Plymouth Road in northeast Ann Arbor have upset residents who say the array is an eyesore and are frustrated by the lack of communication between the college and nearby residents.

 

USA TODAY

Column: Learn before the student loan

By Sabina Bharwani and Carrie Sheffield

On Tuesday, the Federal Reserve announced yet another jump in the amount of student loan debt that Americans are carrying. With that debt surpassing credit card debt, efforts to keep the $1 trillion burden from becoming the next financial bubble to pop should include finding ways to slow its exponential growth. Financial literacy must be an important part of the effort.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Where the action is in higher education

By Valerie Strauss

Should everybody go to college? What’s a non-traditional student? What’s a “second-chance” institution? What are community colleges doing? Is American education as big a mess as some make it out to be?

 

WALL STREET JOURNAL

Colleges Lose Pricing Power .

By MICHAEL CORKERY

The demand for four-year college degrees is softening, the result of a perfect storm of economic and demographic forces that is sapping pricing power at a growing number of U.S. colleges and universities, according to a new survey by Moody's Investors Service.

 

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

 

WASHINGTON POST

Where the action is in higher education

By Valerie Strauss

Should everybody go to college? What’s a non-traditional student? What’s a “second-chance” institution? What are community colleges doing? Is American education as big a mess as some make it out to be? These are some of the issues that I discussed in the following Q & A with Mike Rose, a highly respected professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and author of several books.

 

NPR

Elite Colleges Struggle To Recruit Smart, Low-Income Kids

By Shankar Vedantam

Across the United States, college administrators are poring over student essays, recommendation letters and SAT scores as they select a freshman class for the fall. If this is like most years, administrators at top schools such as Harvard and Stanford will try hard to find talented high school students from poor families in a push to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus and to counter the growing concern that highly selective colleges cater mainly to students from privileged backgrounds.

 

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

 

MLIVE

Ferris State University announces Martin Luther King Jr. Day events

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University is gearing up for Martin Luther King Jr. day, with everything from marches to community service projects planned from Monday, Jan. 21-23.

 

Michigan State to offer free laundry services to dorm residents beginning this fall

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Come this fall, Michigan State University's 16,000-some on-campus student residents will enjoy a new amenity. Free laundry services.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan President Coleman member of leadership board calling for Obama to address gun violence

By Kellie Woodhouse

The Association of American Universities —whose executive committee includes University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman— has called on president Obama for "meaningful action" on gun control.

 

Saturday-Monday, January 5-7, 2013

 

OAKLAND PRESS

New president named at Oakland Community College campus in Auburn Hills

By DIANA DILLABER-MURRAY

David L. Mathews has been named president of the Auburn Hills Campus by Oakland Community College Chancellor Tim Meyer. Mathews, 63, replaces Patricia Dolly, who retired as president of the campus in late fall to be a senior advisor to Oakland University President Gary Russi.

 

MLIVE

Adrian College receiving $1 million grant from Dow Foundation to aid in building renovation project

By Leanne Smith

ADRIAN, MI – Renovations to Adrian College’s business and science buildings is getting a $1 million boost in the form of a grant from the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation of Midland. The grant will aid in a $12 million project to upgrade the college’s Peelle and Jones halls that’s expected to break ground this spring, college officials said.

 

Why Grand Valley State University administrator pushes improvements for part-time faculty

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Administrators at Grand Valley State University are seeking to provide more training and development opportunities for part-time faculty, an initiative they say will benefit students and teachers alike.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Local higher education unions gross $6.9M a year but brace for lower revenues after right-to-work passage

By Kellie Woodhouse

Unionized workers of three public higher education institutions based in Washtenaw County pay at least $6.9 million a year in union dues, according to payroll figures. Those dues help buy political influence in Lansing and Washington, D.C., as well as fund bargaining and pay administrative staff and office rent, among many other things.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

MSU offers free laundry to keep students in dorms

By David Jesse

Michigan State University students are going to have a lot more quarters in their pockets next year. The university is going to make laundry free in all its residence halls, which means no more digging through the cushions in the couch for that last quarter to make sure there's something clean to wear to class. The program starts in all dorms in the fall.

 

Wayne State med students care for homeless, others on Detroit's streets

By Megha Satyanarayana

First the left arm. Then the right. Jonathan Wong, a 29-year-old Wayne State University medical student, moved the blood pressure cuff from one of Thomas Wise's arms to the other to get a better reading. Then, another medical student tested the 45-year-old's cranial nerve response -- could he puff his cheeks? Could he move his tongue?

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Students Rush to Web Classes, but Profits May Be Much Later

By TAMAR LEWIN

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — In August, four months after Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng started the online education company Coursera, its free college courses had drawn in a million users, a faster launching than either Facebook or Twitter.

 

USA TODAY

Column: Picking politics and football over education

By Rodney K. Smith

On Wednesday, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett filed an antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA in an effort to dismantle the sanctions imposed on Penn State University's football program. Corbett claimed that the NCAA "piled on . . . the citizens of Pennsylvania" when it entered into a consent decree with Penn State University, imposing strong sanctions on the University related to a horrific sex abuse scandal involving a former football coach.

 

Column: Higher education crises and how to beat them

By Gene A. Budig

There is much talk about the skyrocketing rise in college tuition. For most people, there is a real fear that a four-year degree has become unaffordable.

 

Friday, January 4, 2013

 

DETROIT NEWS

WSU president's tenure marked by change, progress

By Kim Kozlowski

Detroit — When Allan Gilmour became the 11th president of Wayne State University two years ago, one of the first problems he tackled was the school's graduation rate, one of the lowest in the state.

 

Thursday, January 3, 2013

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Is a University of Michigan education a good value? Ranking reports yes

By Kellie Woodhouse

How much bang for your buck are you getting at the University of Michigan? According to Kiplinger, the Ann Arbor school is the 11th best in-state value among public colleges. For out-of-state students, it's ranked as the 18th best value— in spite of being the most expensive school for non-residents on a list of 100 'best value' public institutions.

 

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

CMU's medical school gets residency accreditation

By Associated Press

Central Michigan University says it has received additional accreditation as it prepares to open its medical school in summer 2013. The university says the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has granted five-year institutional accreditation to the new medical school's residency programs associated with Covenant HealthCare and St. Mary's of Michigan.

 

Alma College: We'll pay for 5th year of school so student can complete degree

By David Jesse

ALMA -- The University of Kentucky wants Zakkary Hardyniec to come to school there, not because of his jump shot, but because of the work the Alma College junior is doing on muscle stem cells. The 21-year-old from Wayne has been to the University of Kentucky for one fellowship. The scientists he has been working with are eager for him to come there for his postgraduate work.

 

U-M prof's YouTube videos just right for many wanting information

By David Jesse

A hand, marker and whiteboard appear on the screen. The hand begins to sketch a stick figure with a stocking hat on top. A voice-over asks a provocative question: "Does wearing a hat keep you warm while dancing naked?"

 

DETROIT NEWS

Students polish images on Web

By Carolyn Thompson

Buffalo, N.Y. — Samantha Grossman wasn't always thrilled with the impression that emerged when people Googled her name. "It wasn't anything too horrible," she said. "I just have a common name. There would be pictures, college partying pictures, that weren't of me, things I wouldn't want associated with me."

 

Michigan 2-year colleges now can offer bachelor's degrees

By Karen Bouffard

Lansing — A bill to allow community colleges to offer four bachelor's degrees is among 22 bills signed into law Friday. Public Act 495 will allow the state's 28 community colleges to offer baccalaureate degrees in energy production, concrete technology, maritime technology and culinary arts. Nursing was originally on the list but was dropped in an amended version of the bill.

 

Michigan State academic chief to step down

By Associated Press

East Lansing — Michigan State University says its chief academic officer is stepping down to join a Washington, D.C.-based, Africa-focused nonprofit organization with ties to the school.

Related story:

> MLive: Michigan State Provost Kim Wilcox to step down in July

 

MSU OKs $7M Anthony Hall energy retrofit

By Associated Press

East Lansing — Michigan State University is trying to turn one of its oldest science buildings into a model of energy efficiency under a new $7 million project at Anthony Hall.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Lawrence Tech partners with Ohio community college in ‘significant’ robotics agreement

Lawrence Technological University has signed an agreement to allow students from Terra State Community College in Fremont, Ohio, to transfer up to 64 credits toward completion of a bachelor of science degree from LTU in robotics engineering.

 

MLIVE

Liberal arts colleges forced to evolve with market

By Associated Press

ADRIAN, Mich.— They're the places you think of when you think of "college" — leafy campuses, small classes, small towns. Liberal arts colleges are where students ponder life's big questions, and learn to think en route to successful careers and richer lives, if not always to the best-paying first jobs.

 

Delta College, Central Michigan University named second, fifth safest campuses in state

By Lindsay Knake

SAGINAW, MI — Two mid-Michigan schools are ranked in the top five in the state for safe campuses, according to stateuniversity.com. Delta College is the No. 2 safest campus in Michigan, and Central Michigan University is the fifth safest campus in the state.

 

GVSU leaders remember Robert Pew as transformational force

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- To Grand Valley State University, Robert C. Pew II was a giant. University leaders, reflecting Monday on Pew’s death, described how he was not only instrumental in creating GVSU, but through his advice and philanthropic giving he helped transform the college into one of Michigan’s leading public universities.

 

Decreasing college dropout rate is crucial to Michigan's economic future

By Rick Haglund

Just about everyone in Michigan thinks a college education is important for a successful career. That’s the good news. The bad news is that far too many young people are dropping out of high school and not attending college. And those who do go to college are dropping out at a troubling rate.

 

DAILY BEAST

How Religion Is Making a Comeback on College Campuses

One in three Americans under the age of 30 reports being religiously unaffiliated, so it may be a surprise to learn that religion is making a comeback on American campuses. It’s not that campuses have become holy places, and religious zealots are not calling the shots. But religion is no longer marginalized from campus life as it was in the late 20th century. A generation ago, many Americans and most colleges and universities could live with the myth that religion was a purely private matter, but today no one questions that religion can have powerful effects on individuals and societies.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Holiday Break Tests the Spirits of Freshmen and Their Parents

By JAN HOFFMAN

STEVEN and Loraine Summer adore their sons Jason, 20, a junior at the University of Maryland, and Ari, 22, a graduate student at the University of Colorado. When the boys returned home in Denver to visit at Thanksgiving, their parents enjoyed the adult conversation and learning about their sons’ career ambitions and new interests.

 

Campus Protests Return, but Over Rebranding

By TANZINA VEGA

COLLEGE students can have visceral reactions to many things — dormitory life, cafeteria food, midterms. And in this age of instant criticism online, another item can be added to that list: protests against the efforts of universities to refresh their logos, slogans and mascots.

 

Friday, December 21, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

2 Michigan college presidents sign letter seeking campus gun ban

By David Jesse

Presidents of two Michigan private colleges are among the more than 100 higher--education leaders from across the nation to sign an open letter urging action on gun safety legislation, including a national ban on guns on campuses and in schools.

Related story:

> Detroit News: Michigan college presidents call for more gun safety laws

 

MLIVE

Some West Michigan colleges missing in campus crime list

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Valley State University was ranked the sixth safest institution among 18 Michigan colleges and universities in an analysis of campus crime data by stateuniversity.com.

 

Fiscal cliff: Proposed changes to charitable giving worry Kalamazoo College President Eileen Wilson-Oyelaran

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College President Eileen Wilson-Oyelaran is among college leaders sending letters this month about the looming fiscal cliff to top congressional leaders and President Barack Obama.

 

Thursday, December 20, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

2-year colleges await 4-year plan

By Kim Kozlowski

Michigan community college students may soon be able to earn bachelor's degrees in certain fields, which some say is a step in meeting the needs of students and a changing workforce.

 

MLIVE

Ferris State University faculty association makes surprise contract offer; board remains silent

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University’s faculty association has asked the school’s board of trustees to extend its existing contract – due to expire in June – for an additional two years.

 

Glen Oaks Community College faculty votes 'no confidence' in president

By Ursula Zerilli

STURGIS, MI – The faculty at Glen Oaks Community College gave President Gary Wheeler a vote of "no confidence" earlier this month after running into troubles applying for re-accreditation.

 

Ferris State University names Tennessee educator dean of optometry college

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University has tapped a professor from Tennessee to lead its college of optometry.

 

Western Michigan University changing emergency alert system, may expand security after Newtown school shooting

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI –The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting came as a sad reminder to Western Michigan University administrators that it is time to change its WMU Alert System, which robocalls students in the event of an emergency.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Arrests in a Freshman’s Drinking Death Reflect a Tougher Approach

By STEVEN YACCINO

In that time, David Bogenberger, one of 19 pledges seeking entry into the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity here at Northern Illinois University, drank enough to put him nearly four times over the legal alcohol limit. Mr. Bogenberger, a 19-year-old freshman, died in his sleep that night.

 

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

 

MLIVE

Report highlights job training programs at Grand Rapids Community College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Job training programs at Grand Rapids Community College were highlighted in a report examining how well two-year colleges implemented practices aimed at educating low-income and displaced workers.

 

WMU President John Dunn responds to criticism of East Campus renovation plans

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University President John Dunn remembers not even knowing about East Campus while being interviewed for his current position in 2007.

 

Two West Michigan colleges won’t follow University of Iowa’s decision to ask applicants if they identify with LGBT community

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The University of Iowa last week became first public university in the U.S. to inquire about the sexual orientation of prospective undergraduate students, a move meant to better serve and more quickly connect LGBT students with resources.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Congress' action puts Nigerian closer to medical school dream

By David Jesse and Todd Spangler

He arrived in Michigan from Nigeria as a 15-year-old, alone, with large tumors spread over his head and threatening his life. A decade later, he is headed to medical school, the tumors removed and permanent U.S. residency coming his way, thanks to rare action by Congress on Tuesday.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

First-floor renovation of MSU Union complete

By Ken Palmer

EAST LANSING — Among the new furniture, carpeting and other accents on the renovated first floor of the Michigan State University Union building are fixtures from a bygone era.

 

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Wayne State faculty union: We're willing to go on strike

By David Jesse

Wayne State University's faculty has authorized the union leadership to call a strike against the university at any time as negotiations over a new contract drag on. "A strike authorization is not a strike," union president Charles Parrish, a political science professor, said Monday. "It's a notification to the other side that things are very serious."

 

MLIVE

How Michigan's right-to-work law will impact faculty at Grand Rapids-area colleges

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Union leaders at two Grand Rapids-area colleges expect Michigan’s new right-to-work law to thin their ranks, but by how much remains to be seen.

 

K-12 educators explain why they support differential tuition rate at Grand Rapids Community College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A proposal by Grand Rapids Community College to develop a differential tuition rate for some dual enrolled students was embraced by at least three K-12 administrators last week who say the plan promotes college readiness.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Lansing Community College counselors safe - for now

By Matthew Miller

Deborah Canja mostly sounded frustrated. “It’s not that the counselors aren’t wonderful,” the Lansing Community College trustee said, nearly four hours into a Board of Trustees meeting Monday night. “It’s not that the services aren’t needed. It’s not that they’re not helping students. It’s not that counseling isn’t critical to student success, because all of that is true.”

 

Saturday-Monday, December 15-17, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Scaring away the grads Michigan needs to woo

By Brian Dickerson

As he approaches the halfway mark of his first term, Gov. Rick Snyder remains convinced that luring new jobs to Michigan will attract the educated young people he needs to fill them -- or at least stanch the state's decade-long hemorrhage of youthful talent.

 

At Michigan State graduation, Snyder talks about career, not politics

By David Jesse

EAST LANSING -- Jordan Bresnahan planned to spend Saturday celebrating his graduation from Michigan State University. But before he headed inside the campus' Breslin Student Events Center for the ceremony, he spent time outside, protesting Gov. Rick Snyder, the featured speaker at the event.

Related stories:

> Detroit News: Cheers and boos for Gov. Snyder as he addresses MSU graduates

> MLive: Amid right-to-work protest, Gov. Rick Snyder tells MSU graduates, 'We want Michigan to be attractive to you so you stay here'

> Lansing State Journal: Nearly 100 protesters turn out for Snyder's MSU speech

 

MLIVE

GRCC weighs in after Legislature approves bill allowing two-year colleges to offer bachelor's degrees

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Community colleges could begin offering bachelor’s degrees in several areas under legislation approved Thursday by the Michigan Legislature. The legislation, approved by a narrow margin late Thursday in the state Senate, now heads to Gov. Rick Snyder for approval.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

2012 salary report: 20 University of Michigan deans collect $7.28M in base pay

By Kellie Woodhouse

Two University of Michigan dean reappointments in 2012 came with 13 percent salary increases. Overall, U-M's 20 deans earn a combined $7.28 million in base salaries, according to compensation figures released Friday by the school. Last year U-M's deans earned $6.92 million.

 

EMU campus patrol services increases presence following student's death

By Erica Hobbs

Students of Eastern Michigan University's walking escort and patrol service have been beefing up their campus presence since the suspicious death of fellow student Julia Niswender Tuesday. The Student Eyes and Ears for University Safety, better known as “SEEUS,” has extended its walking service hours and added additional escort staff to maintain student security.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

UC drops controversial new logo

By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times

The new University of California logo is a no-go. Responding to a wave of revulsion in the last week over the symbol's modern design, officials announced Friday that they would suspend further use of the logo and remove it where possible.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Smaller U.S. Colleges Try to Crack Chinese Market

By LARA FARRAR

BEIJING — One factor that made it easier for Samford University to catch the attention of some of the thousands of Chinese students at a recent education expo was that many mistook it for a university with a similar name: Stanford.

 

For Student Borrowers, Relief Now May Mean a Big Tax Bill Later

By RON LIEBER

Those breathing a sigh of relief that their student loan payments are now in line with their income may want to re-examine the rules that set the payment in the first place. There could be a tax time bomb looming, slowly ticking away. And defusing it is not a big part of the policy discussion in Washington at the moment.

 

Friday, December 14, 2012

 

MLIVE

WMU School of Medicine names Laurie Richlin as chair of medical education

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Western Michigan University School of Medicine has named Laurie Richlin the Chair of the Department of Medical Education. The Western Michigan University School of Medicine, which is slated to open in fall 2014, is a collaboration involving Western Michigan University and Kalamazoo’s two teaching hospitals, Borgess Medical Center and Bronson Methodist Hospital.

 

New members of Ferris State University foundation eager to serve

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University’s foundation board, which helps oversee the school’s fundraising efforts, has three new members.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Student protesters urge U-M regents to offer in-state tuition to undocumented residents

By David Jesse

Seconds after University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman banged the gavel to start Thursday’s Board of Regents meeting, the first student stood up.

Related story:

> AnnArbor.com: University of Michigan student protesters demand tuition equality for illegal immigrants

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan CFO: Purchasing Blimpy Burger property 'makes so much sense' for school's long-term plan

By Kellie Woodhouse

It's official: The University of Michigan will soon close on the Blimpy Burger property. On Thursday the school's eight-member Board of Regents unanimously approved the $1.075 million purchase of the parcel that houses Krazy Jim's Blimpy Burger and an adjacent apartment building. The $425,000 purchase of the neighboring property was also approved.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Building a Showcase Campus, Using an I.O.U.

By ANDREW MARTIN

Some call it the Edifice Complex. Others have named it the Law of More, or the Taj Mahal syndrome. A decade-long spending binge to build academic buildings, dormitories and recreational facilities — some of them inordinately lavish to attract students — has left colleges and universities saddled with large amounts of debt. Oftentimes, students are stuck picking up the bill.

 

Thursday, December 13, 2012

 

MLIVE

Fundraising at Grand Valley State University down 43 percent in 2012

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Coming on the heels of a recently completed fundraising campaign, financial gifts to Grand Valley State University fell in fiscal year 2012, coming in at $8.2 million.

 

WMU poetry student Traci Brimhall wins $25,000 creative writing fellowship

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – A Western Michigan University graduate student is the only student in Michigan to receive a $25,000 cash prize endowment for a creative writing fellowship.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Therapy dogs at U-M's Shapiro Library help students relax during finals

University of Michigan students took a break from their studies to relax and lined up at Shapiro Library Wednesday to pet Golden Retriever therapy dogs Bailey and Jazz.

 

Washtenaw Community College to hire new vice president of administration and finance

By Kellie Woodhouse

Washtenaw Community College is looking for a new vice president of administration and finance. WCC's former finance chief Steven Hardy resigned on Nov. 19.

 

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

MSU board vote on phase of $600M physics project

Associated Press

EAST LANSING — The Michigan State University Board of Trustees meets Friday to consider whether to go ahead with construction of a new phase of a $600 million federally backed physics research facility.

 

U-M's social media director quits over lie on résumé

The University of Michigan's first social media director resigned Monday after it was revealed online that she lied on her résumé, according to the woman and the university.

Related story:

> AnnArbor.com: University of Michigan's 1st social media director resigns after resume inaccuracy revealed

 

MLIVE

Central Michigan researching virtual reality game physical therapy, helping veterans with brain injuries

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — A virtual reality game Central Michigan University is researching could help soldiers recover from brain injuries.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

New UC logo: Marketing blunder? Or is storm of criticism overblown?

By Daniel B. Wood

The University of California – one of the most prestigious public universities in the world – redesigned its logo to stay abreast of the times and attract new students. But the move last week appears to have accomplished just the opposite, and university officials are trying to figure out what to do next.

Related story:

> Los Angeles Times: New UC logo a no-go with students and alumni

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Courting Merit Scholars Opens Door to Questions

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

NORMAN, Okla. — An introductory course here in American government offers the kind of intimate, interactive learning that scholars prize: just 20 students, most of them freshmen, debating the merits of the Senate filibuster one recent morning, and parrying pointed questions from a professor who knew their names.

 

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

EMU to pay $75,000 to settle lawsuit

By Melanie Scott Dorsey

Eastern Michigan University has agree to pay $75,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by a former student expelled from the master's degree counseling program after she refused to counsel a gay client because of her religious beliefs.

Related stories:

> Detroit News: EMU settles lawsuit with booted student for $75K

> AnnArbor.com: EMU resolves case of Julea Ward, former student kicked out of program for declining to counsel gay client

 

MLIVE

Davenport president's $581,000 compensation is highest among Michigan's private colleges

By Brian McVicar

CALEDONIA TOWNSHIP, MI -- Davenport University President Richard Pappas is the highest compensated leader of a private, nonprofit college in Michigan, bringing in $581,564 in 2010, according to a presidential pay survey.

Related story:

> New York Times: Three Dozen Private-College Presidents Earned Over $1 Million in 2010, Study Finds

 

Check out inside of Grand Valley State University's new $40 million business center in Grand Rapids

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Inside the newest addition to Grand Valley State University’s campus in downtown Grand Rapids, what promises to be an innovative center for academics and community outreach is taking shape.

 

WMU plans to renovate, raze historic buildings bittersweet to East Campus supporters

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – News of Western Michigan University’s plans to demolish West and North halls, the Speech and Hearing Center and possibly wings of East Hall was disappointing for Thomas Coyne, a former alumni relations director at WMU and member of the Friends of Historic East Campus group.

 

Why Grand Rapids Community College is considering differential tuition rates for some students

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Administrators at Grand Rapids Community College are pushing a proposal that would reduce tuition for some high school students dual enrolled at the college.

 

Part-time instructors and graduate teaching assistants form umbrella union at KVCC, Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Local union members may have been the only labor activists celebrating in Michigan over the weekend.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan lab to get new home at NCRC after $4.38M renovation

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan is planning a $4.38 million renovation of a North Campus Research Complex building so the facility can house an updated laboratory. The school's Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory, a facility that will house 12 highly specialized microscopes that can perform atomic-level analysis of materials, will be located within 8,900 square feet of NCRC Building 22.

 

University of Michigan plans $4.44 million renovation of school's largest computer lab and nearby areas

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan is planning a $4.44 million renovation of the school's largest computer lab and three adjacent classrooms.

 

University of Michigan to pay $1.5M for Blimpy Burger property and nearby building

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan is buying the property that houses Krazy Jim's Blimpy Burger for $1.075 million, according to an internal U-M memo.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Fallen Dean’s Life, Contradictory to Its Grisly End

By WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM, WENDY RUDERMAN and MOSI SECRET

She sat in her regular beauty salon, strikingly optimistic, eyeing in the mirror not a defendant but a woman whose fortunes would surely turn the next day. The evidence and testimony in Federal District Court in Brooklyn had quickly mounted against her, but Cecilia Chang was convinced that once she took the stand at her corruption trial, things would change.

 

Saturday-Monday, December 8-10, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M lecturers rally turns into right-to-work protest

By David Jesse

A rally by members of the University of Michigan's Lecturers Employee Organization that planned to focus on the pay gap they say exists between them and other faculty members quickly turned into a right-to-work protest and organizational meeting Friday.

Related stories:

> Detroit News: U-M lecturers say pay too low

 

DETROIT NEWS

UDM law clinic moves to expand reach

By Candice Williams

Detroit — The University of Detroit Mercy Law School clinic's move to a renovated former downtown firehouse should be just the draw for clients seeking free legal services, officials said.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Smoking banned on Oakland campus starting fall 2013

By KEVIN GRAHAM

Smokers at Oakland University will have to stomp out their butts when they return to classes in fall 2013.

 

MLIVE

President Gerald R. Ford's daughter, Susan Ford Bales, urges Grand Valley State University graduates to serve public

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Susan Ford Bales, speaking Saturday, Dec. 8, at Grand Valley State University’s commencement, challenged graduates to reach for their dreams and use their talents and education to serve the public.

 

'(Bleep) Censorship' posters not OK on Saginaw Valley State billboards, prompting legal challenge

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — A Saginaw Valley State University student says the school is inhibiting his freedom of speech, but university officials say otherwise.

 

Ferris State University to expand largest program to Traverse City college

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University in January will begin offering a criminal justice bachelor’s degree – among its most popular programs – at Northwestern Michigan College in Traverse City.

 

How Obamacare health reform could affect faculty at colleges and universities

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- With about a year left before major portions of the federal health reform law take effect, colleges around the country – including Grand Rapids Community College – are looking for more guidance about how new regulations will affect adjunct instructors.

 

Transfer students from 4 community colleges can complete 2-year degrees at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University and four community colleges from across the state signed reverse transfer agreements on Tuesday to help community college students earn an associate degree while pursuing a bachelor’s degree at WMU.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

To Steer Students Toward Jobs, Florida May Cut Tuition for Select Majors

By LIZETTE ALVAREZ

MIAMI — Rick Scott, businessman turned politician, campaigned for governor in 2010 with promises to run Florida like a successful business — more efficiency, lower costs, less hand-wringing and measurable results.

 

Three Dozen Private-College Presidents Earned Over $1 Million in 2010, Study Finds

By TAMAR LEWIN

WASHINGTON — Three dozen private-college presidents earned more than $1 million in total compensation in 2010, the same number as in the previous year, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s analysis of federal tax documents.

 

Major Renter to Students to Pay Millions for Civil Fraud

By SAM DOLNICK

The founder of a nonprofit group that has rented affordable apartments to a generation of New York City college students siphoned millions of dollars from the agency through a shell company, using the group’s money to fly back and forth to a second home in Aspen, Colo., and to pay for a luxury penthouse in Brooklyn, an investigation by the state attorney general’s office has found.

 

Friday, December 7, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Wayne State University official who alleged funds misused sues over firing

By David Jesse

For several years, Joseph Baynesan tried to tell Wayne State University administrators that his boss was misusing federal grant money to fund the school's African-American commencement, subsidize student's GRE fees and pay stipends for students not enrolled in the Ronald E. McNair program at the school.

 

MLIVE

Dean of Grand Valley State University's business school steps down to lead historically black college

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The dean of Grand Valley State University’s Seidman College of Business announced he will step down to become president of Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tenn.

 

Campaign contributions by PAC tied to Grand Valley State University down about 95 percent since 2004

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Campaign donations by a political action committee tied to Grand Valley State University have dropped about 95 percent since 2004, with contributions in 2012 likely hitting their lowest mark in nearly a decade.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Two regents step down after 8 years on Eastern Michigan University's governing board

By Kellie Woodhouse

Two long-serving members of the Eastern Michigan University Board of Regents are stepping down this month, making way for two new faces.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Why everyone shouldn’t go to college

By Larry Cuban

Three facts caught my eye recently: *In California, 260,000 college graduates under the age of 30 are working in low-paying jobs that have historically gone to high school graduates and dropouts such as food services, retail sales, and clerical work.

 

Thursday, December 6, 2012

 

MLIVE

Learn how much West Michigan university PACs pumped into state campaigns

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- In the lead up to the November election, political action committees connected to public universities in West Michigan opened their wallets, doling out financial contributions to candidates running for state office throughout Michigan.

 

Jackson Community College seeking groups interested in running an early college charter school on its campus

By Leanne Smith

JACKSON, MI – Jackson Community College is accepting proposals from outside organizations interested in running a charter school that a group of area residents has asked it to authorize.

 

Kalamazoo College announces new social justice project competitions with $5,000 and $25,000 prizes

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College has established a new prize competition to find and fund the most innovative and collaborative social justice and human rights projects in the world and local region.

 

Student apartment rental rates increasing .5 to 3.5 percent next year at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Students living in Western Michigan University's apartments will see their rent payments go up next fall after the WMU Board of Trustees approved rate increases at a meeting on Wednesday.

 

Davenport University taps Florida educator to serve as business school dean

By Brian McVicar

CALEDONIA TOWNSHIP, MI -- A former professor and administrator at a liberal arts college in Florida is set to take the reins of Davenport University’s college of business.

 

Western Michigan University President John Dunn donates 1 percent raise to student scholarships

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University President John Dunn will be receiving a one percent pay raise this year, but has vowed to donate the additional money to student scholarships.

 

Achieving LEED Gold certification at Grand Rapids’ Old Federal Building a victory for Kendall College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Transforming the once decaying old federal building into a renovated, energy-efficient structure was a daunting task – even for Ryan Idema, an engineer who’s spent his career infusing buildings with a sustainable design.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

New push for two-year degrees could be smart move for US, report says

By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo

If the US is to become a world leader once again in the percentage of citizens earning college degrees – as President Obama has called for by 2020 – it could go a long way by giving more attention to getting community college students over the finish line, a new report suggests.

 

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University to add new housing by fall 2014

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland University plans to add new campus housing for 550 freshmen and sophomore students in the Fall 2014 to meet the demands of the growing institution that had to put students up in hotels at the beginning of this school year.

 

MLIVE

Departing trustees Dennis Archer and Larry Tolbert reflect on WMU leadership, funding, rising costs

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Reduced state funding and the rising costs of higher education are issues that continue to concern Western Michigan University trustees Dennis Archer and Larry Tolbert, who will attend their last meeting on Wednesday after eight years on the WMU Board of Trustees.

 

WMU trustees to act on Western View apartment rates, contract and pay for President John Dunn

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University's Board of Trustees is expected to act on President John Dunn's contract and compensation and on rental rates for Western View apartments at its meeting Wednesday, Dec. 5.

 

Central Michigan University to consider adding women's golf, lacrosse teams

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan University may bring two new women's sports to the university.

 

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

 

MLIVE

Student projects that benefit community up for awards at Grand Rapids Community College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Teaching low-income residents how to plan for healthy meals. Educating pregnant teens about the importance of oral hygiene. Helping provide child care for homeless families.

 

President Gerald R. Ford's daughter, Susan Ford Bales, to speak to Grand Valley State University graduates on Saturday

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Susan Ford Bales, daughter of President Gerald R. Ford, is scheduled to speak to Grand Valley State University graduates commencement.

 

National youth employment at lowest level since WWII; 17 percent of Michigan teens and young adults considered 'disconnected'

By Melissa Anders

LANSING, MI — More Michigan teens and young adults are not in school or working, a troubling statistic that has serious implications for the state’s workforce and economy.

 

$800,000 DHS grant will fund coaches to help former foster care students at 7 Michigan colleges

By Ursula Zerilli

LANSING, MI – The Michigan Department of Human Services is allocating $800,000 to implement campus coaches, who will assist students entering college after exiting the foster care system, at seven college and universities across the state.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University passes $29.9 million housing proposal

By Nichole Seguin

The Oakland University Board of Trustees voted Monday to pass the current proposed housing plan. The plan includes the creation of a new building which will provide 550 beds for students. It is scheduled to open in fall 2014.

 

Saturday-Monday, December 1-3, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

MSU team aims to cut wasted energy

By Associated Press

East Lansing — Researchers at Michigan State University are working on a low-cost approach to recapturing the heat energy that is lost in car exhaust and many other industrial processes, in search of a way to improve efficiency and decrease waste.

 

Why the college degree mania?

By George Leef

For many years the conventional wisdom in the United States has been that the more people who graduate from college, the better off we'll be. It's time to challenge that "wisdom." The evidence says it's wrong.

Related story:

> New York Times: Saying No to College

 

MLIVE

College Collage: Fiscal cliff worries WMU financial aid director; student group airs first news show

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The College Collage features what students in the Kalamazoo-area are reporting or creating this week. Western Michigan University's financial aid director Mark Delorey said the looming fiscal cliff could have a major impact on financial aid.  Delorey  told the Western Herald:

 

Kalamazoo College Arcus Center construction to begin next week

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The construction of Kalamazoo College’s new Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership is slated to begin next week after being postponed in October.

 

Consumers Energy cuts GVSU $116,000 check for efficiency upgrades

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- As part of an energy efficiency program, Grand Valley State University has received a $116,280 rebate check for purchasing two energy efficient air conditioning systems.

 

Michigan's affirmative action ban to stay in effect during appeal to Supreme Court

By David Eggert

LANSING, MI - Michigan's ban against affirmative action in public university admissions will remain in place while the state awaits whether the Supreme Court will take its appeal.

 

Karen Matson becomes new director for KVCC Center for New Media

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College has appointed Karen Matson its new director for the Center for New Media. Matson is coming out of retirement to take on a leadership role at KVCC.

 

Ferris State University to pump $35 million into renovating student center

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- The Ferris State University Board of Trustees has approved spending upward of $35 million to renovate the university’s student center, a move that will modernize the aging facility and provide more space for students to gather, administrators say.

 

Gov. Rick Snyder headlines Michigan State December commencement speakers

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- A University of Michigan alumnus is the top-billed speaker for Michigan State University's December commencement ceremonies. Relax, Spartans -- it's Gov. Rick Snyder.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

New agreement allows Washtenaw Community College transfers to receive associate degree with University of Michigan credits

By Kellie Woodhouse

Students who transfer from Washtenaw Community College to the University of Michigan can now use their U-M credits toward degrees from both schools.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Aid Changes Raise Issue of Diversity at Colleges

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

College and university endowments have recovered most of the losses they sustained during the recession, now that the economy has begun to grow. Yet as this year’s high school seniors begin to fill out applications and aid forms, a number of prestigious smaller colleges are straining to meet students’ financial needs. To bridge the gap, some colleges have begun revising their financial aid formulas, raising concerns about how campus diversity — both economic and racial — might be affected.

 

USA TODAY

Editorial: $10k college degrees are on to something

College is many things. Cheap is not one of them. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the average four-year degree costs about $90,000, including tuition, room and board. That's up 70% in the past decade and nearly 700% since 1980. Two-thirds of students finish college with some amount of debt. The average amount tops $26,000.

Related story:

> USA Today: Opposing view: $10K degree a populist gimmick

 

Friday, November 30, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M Provost Philip Hanlon to be Dartmouth's next president

University of Michigan Provost Philip J. Hanlon has been picked as the next president of Dartmouth College. Hanlon, 57, a 1977 graduate of Dartmouth, will take over July 1, 2013, as the 18th president of the Ivy League research university in Hanover, N.H., the school announced today. His appointment was approved by a unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees.

Related stories:

> Detroit News: U-M provost named president of Dartmouth

> AnnArbor.com: University of Michigan Provost Philip Hanlon to become Dartmouth College's next president

> New York Times: Michigan Provost Named to Lead Dartmouth

 

DETROIT NEWS

Mich. AG Schuette asks U.S. Supreme Court to review affirmative action ruling

By Associated Press

Lansing — Michigan's attorney general has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a ruling declaring the state's ban on affirmative action in college admissions unconstitutional. Bill Schuette filed a petition Thursday with the court.

 

Student loan relief needed for bereaved parents

By Ella Edwards

My only son, Jermaine Edwards, died in 2009 at just 24 years old. Three years later, I'm still being forced by First Marblehead Corporation to pay off Jermaine's student debt — even though he'll never have the chance to use his college education.

 

MLIVE

New WMU trustees Michelle Crumm and Ron Hall both have business backgrounds, CEO experience

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University President John Dunn said he's delighted to welcome Ann Arbor entrepreneur Michelle Crumm and a Detroit-area businessman and 1965 WMU alumnus Ronald Hall to the university's Board of Trustees.

 

Calvin College works to plug budget shortfall; top financial officer steps down

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Calvin College’s top financial officer is stepping down, President Michael Le Roy announced in a letter sent to faculty and staff this week.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan student group rallies for tuition freeze

By Katrease Stafford

Nearly 40 University of Michigan students gathered at the Diag Thursday to rally support in asking the administration to freeze tuition next year. The students cited rising tuition costs and increasing student loan rates as a reason the U-M administration should take the step toward freezing tuition.

 

BATTLE CREEK ENQUIRER

B.C. Central takes action

By Justin A. Hinkley

Following a momentous Oct. 5 march downtown in which Battle Creek Central High School sought to silence its detractors, students there have launched a host of leadership projects meant to show their fellow students and the community what Bearcats are really about.

 

PATCH

Rochester College Begins Search For New President

By Kristin Bull

Rochester College has begun a national search to find a "qualified, experienced and visionary president" for the college before next spring, the school has announced.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

For-Profit University’s Shift to Division I Stokes Debate

By TIM ROHAN

College sports fans should soon be able to buy stock in a Division I program. Grand Canyon University, a for-profit institution in Phoenix, announced this week that it would join the Western Athletic Conference, becoming the first school of its kind to compete at the highest level of N.C.A.A. athletics.

 

Thursday, November 29, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Still no deal for WSU faculty; more talks are scheduled for Friday

By David Jesse

It's beginning to look like the entire first semester will pass without Wayne State University's faculty and administration agreeing to a new union contract. Talks between the faculty union and the administration are still before a state mediator, WSU spokesman Matt Lockwood said Wednesday. The next meeting is scheduled for Friday.

 

Opposing points of view: Diversity first: Affirmative action ruling must stand

By Daniel H. Krichbaum

Admission decisions are a critical part of a university's academic mission. They should not be controlled by special interests with agendas other than academic excellence. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals' recent decision on higher education diversity doesn't tell Michigan's universities whom they must admit; it simply says that the decision should be a university's to make.

Related story:

> Detroit Free Press: Opposing points of view: Color-blindness is the only way to ensure fair admission

 

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

 

MLIVE

Ferris State University looks to better serve Latino students

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI --As the number of Hispanic students attending college continues to grow, Ferris State University is taking steps to strengthen its relationships with the Latino community on campus and in Grand Rapids.

 

Ferris criticizes state's approach to funding higher education; calls some requirements 'intrusive'

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University said a slight one-time boost to its annual state appropriation this year was a welcome change after years of cuts, but lawmakers should develop a sustainable way to fund higher education, according to the university’s most recent annual audit.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

$1.28B: University of Michigan top U.S. public college in research spending

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan has topped its public peers in research and development spending for the third year in a row, according to the U.S. National Science Foundation. The Ann Arbor school spent $1.28 billion on research during the 2010-11 fiscal year, up 8 percent from the previous year, according to the NSF.

 

Thursday-Tuesday, November 22-27, 2012

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Transgender students seek unisex bathrooms at Oakland University

By KEVIN GRAHAM

A group of Oakland University students is pushing for an increase in the number of unisex or “family” restrooms throughout the campus. The transgender students are circulating a petition around campus to call on the university to put in the bathrooms to address the safety concerns they have.

 

MLIVE

SVSU adds master of nursing education program at University Center of Gaylord

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — Saginaw Valley State University is bringing a segment of its nursing program into Northern Michigan. Gaylord-area residents in May 2013 can start take courses toward a master of science in nursing education at the University Center Gaylord.

 

Federal government nutrition program for children sees online success thanks to Western Michigan University professor

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – More than 1 million people have used a child nutrition website, started with the help of Western Michigan University professor Robert Bensley, to help low-income parents learn better child-feeding behaviors.

 

Kalamazoo Valley Community College appoints new safety leaders, installs 150 emergency phones on campus

By Ursula Zerilli

TEXAS TOWNSHIP, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College is implementing new campus safety measures after appointing new leadership to its public safety department and purchasing a new emergency phone system.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Mary Sue Coleman: Michigan will 'wait and see' how affirmative action fares in federal courts before changing policy

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman said Monday that the institution would take a "wait and see attitude" on affirmative action. Coleman's statement comes less than two weeks after a federal appellate court, in an 8-7 vote, struck down a voter-approved 2006 constitutional amendment that banned affirmative action practices by Michigan's 15 public colleges.

 

USA TODAY

States post grads' pay by college and degree

By Mary Beth Marklein

Eager to assess the value of a college education, a small but growing number of states are publishing databases comparing the earning power of degrees for recent graduates based on where they went to school.

 

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Wayne State gets $5M for scholarships, literacy

By Associated Press

Detroit — Wayne State University has received $5 million to create scholarships for the School of Medicine and support the university's community outreach adult literacy program.

 

MLIVE

Ferris State, looking to boost its profile in China, hires well-known Michigan consultant

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University is looking to expand its footprint in China. As the number of international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities grows, Ferris wants to further boost recruitment in China and forge relationships with higher education institutions there.

 

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Obama nominates U-M education dean to serve on National Science Foundation

By Cole Bertsos

President Barack Obama has nominated University of Michigan School of Education Dean Deborah Loewenberg Ball to be one of seven new members of the National Science Board, according to a report on the U-M News Service.

 

MLIVE

Ferris State's outgoing board chair reflects on his tenure after Gov. Rick Snyder appoints new members

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- A marketing expert from East Lansing and a vice president of a Michigan financial institution have been selected by Gov. Rick Snyder for spots on Ferris State University’s board of trustees.

 

How Calvin College edged out other Grand Rapids-area colleges to land most international students

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Peek inside a classroom or two at Calvin College and it won’t be too long until you notice a group of students whose numbers have grown over the past decade at the Christian, liberal arts college – international students.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

College of Future Could Be Come One, Come All

By TAMAR LEWIN

Teaching Introduction to Sociology is almost second nature to Mitchell Duneier, a professor at Princeton: he has taught it 30 times, and a textbook he co-wrote is in its eighth edition. But last summer, as he transformed the class into a free online course, he had to grapple with some brand-new questions: Where should he focus his gaze while a camera recorded the lectures? How could the 40,000 students who enrolled online share their ideas? And how would he know what they were learning?

 

A Class Where Opening Minds, Not Earning Credits, Is the Point

By TAMAR LEWIN

Tuvan throat singing was never in my repertoire. I had never heard of Tuva, a small Russian republic north of Mongolia. And until the third week of “Listening to World Music,” a free online course taught by a University of Pennsylvania professor, I did not know that the human throat was capable of producing two notes simultaneously.

 

Immigrants to Pay Tuition at Rate Set for Residents

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Thousands of illegal immigrants living in Massachusetts can qualify for state resident tuition rates at state colleges, under a policy laid out on Monday by Gov. Deval Patrick — another shift in the fast-changing mosaic of states’ policies toward that population.

 

Saturday-Monday, November 17-19, 2012

 

MLIVE

Jobs market growing faster for graduates with associate's degrees than more advanced education

By Melissa Anders

LANSING, MI — College graduates can expect a slightly better job market this year, but research shows employers’ confidence is strained and many students aren’t doing enough to prepare for careers. The job market for college graduates will grow about 3 percent this school year, according to Michigan State University’s annual Recruiting Trends report released Thursday. Growth is especially strong for associate’s degrees, which should see hiring increase by 31 percent as more jobs, particularly in manufacturing, require more advanced technical training and education than they used to mandate.

 

Michigan Senate once rejected one of Gov. Rick Snyder's new picks for GVSU board

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Gov. Rick Snyder appointed two new members to Grand Valley State University’s board of trustees on Friday, Nov. 16 – a publisher of a prominent Detroit-based business publication and the CEO of Consumers Energy.

 

Ferris State: Michigan's ban on affirmative action meant fewer tools to attract minorities

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University says a constitutional amendment – struck down Thursday, Nov. 15 by a federal appellate court – banning affirmative action in college admissions gave administrators fewer tools to build a diverse student body.

 

Friday, November 16, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Appeals court throws out Michigan's affirmative action ban

By Paul Egan and David Jesse

A federal appeals court decision on Thursday throwing out Michigan's voter-approved ban on affirmative action is not the last word on whether the state's universities can use race-conscious admissions policies. Although hailed by affirmative action supporters as a major victory, the 8-7 decision by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati likely is headed on appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, which already is considering another affirmative action case involving a Texas university that could impact colleges and universities nationwide. Thursday's ruling focused on university admissions, although the ballot initiative approved by Michigan voters in 2006 also banned the use of affirmative action in government contracting and hiring. Lawyers said the federal appeals court opinion only struck down what some consider the most significant piece, dealing with university admissions.

Related stories:

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Editorial -- Supreme Court should reinstate voters' verdict on affirmative action

> DETROIT NEWS: Mich. affirmative action ban ruled unconstitutional

> MACOMB DAILY: Michigan affirmative action foes stunned by court ruling

> MLIVE: After court strikes down affirmative action ban, Detroit activists predict minority enrollment will double at universtities

> MLIVE: Why eliminating Michigan's ban on affirmative action will benefit GVSU

> ANNARBOR.COM: Appeals court strikes down ban on affirmative action in university admissions

> LANSING STATE JOURNAL: US court strikes down Michigan affirmative action ban

> CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: US appeals court strikes down Michigan ban on affirmative action

> NEW YORK TIMES: Affirmative Action Ban in Michigan Is Rejected

 

College grads' job prospects to grow slightly, report finds

By David Jesse

Megan Brody is fortunate. As the Michigan State University student wraps up her work on a master's degree in business administration, she already has a job lined up for when she graduates next spring. But many of her fellow MBA students across the country don't and are facing a tough job market, according to MSU's 42nd annual Recruiting Trends report, released Thursday.

 

U-M gets $6M gift for Clements Library

By David Jesse

For the third straight meeting, the University of Michigan Board of Regents has received a multimillion-dollar gift to an arts/culture department on campus. Thursday's gift was a $6-million donation to the Clements Library by the Avenir Foundation.

 

MLIVE

Exploding number of international students at Michigan universities causes both tension and cultural exchange benefits

By Melissa Anders

LANSING, MI — Two Michigan universities rank in the top 10 nationally for the number of international students, prompting some to praise the state and others to question whether the schools should set aside more slots for in-state students.  The Great Lakes state ranks ninth for the most foreign students in the nation.

 

Pact lets Muskegon Community College business students earn credit at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI -- Muskegon Community College students looking to get a bachelor's degree from Western Michigan University's Haworth College of Business will be able to transfer more easily under a joint admission agreement.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan hires new top attorney at $400K salary

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan hired a new chief attorney who will earn 28 percent more than what his predecessor earned. The Ann Arbor school recently tapped Timothy G. Lynch, a top attorney at the U.S. Department of Energy, as the school's next general counsel— effective Jan. 7. Lynch will earn $400,000, according to U-M spokesperson Rick Fitzgerald.

 

University of Michigan music school upgrade, library expansion and stadium paint job approved by regents

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan's eight regents approved six new construction projects during their 3 p.m. meeting Thursday. The governing board OK'd a $23.3 million addition and renovation to the building that houses U-M's music program, a $17.5 million upgrade to a building on its North Campus Research Complex and a $16.8 million expansion and renovation to William L. Clements Library, which houses the university's collection on early American history.

 

Thursday, November 15, 2012

 

MLIVE

University of Michigan mathematician dubbed 2012 Michigan Professor of the Year

By Kellie Woodhouse

A University of Michigan math professor has been awarded one of the most prestigious teaching awards in the state. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education had dubbed Stephen DeBacker the 2012 Michigan Professor of the Year.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

MSU job study is good news for grads

By Justin Pope

Modest good news for college students: MSU’s annual survey predicts that employers will increase hiring of new four-year college graduates about 5 percent in the coming year. Demand for graduates with associate degrees is expected to increase more sharply by about 30 percent compared to last year’s survey while MBA hiring appears headed for a decline.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Financial Worries Pile on Long Before Graduation

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Money troubles interfere with the academic performance of about one-third of all college students, and a similar number of students regularly skip buying required academic materials because of the costs, according to a survey released on Thursday. In an era of stagnant incomes and rising tuition and student debt, the burden of college costs on families and former students is well documented. But the new findings, from the National Survey of Student Engagement, show that financial worries are a major source of stress for undergraduates while they are still in school.

 

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

 

MLIVE

Broad Art Museum draws thousands to Michigan State during opening weekend; $40 million fundraising goal met

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Nearly 6,000 people attended the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University for opening events over the weekend. "We were enormously gratified by the amazing number of people who attended our opening weekend festivities in the museum," said Michael Rush, founding director of the $45 million museum. "We had hoped that 3,000 would come. To have had double that amount is a clear sign that the community is fully ready for us.

 

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grants Michigan State $7.8 million to improve farming in 8 African nations

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Michigan State University has received a $7.8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help eight African countries improve sustainable farming methods.  The grant, from the Gates Foundation Global Development Program, will be used by MSU researchers to help guide legislative efforts to intensify farming methods that meet agricultural needs while improving environmental quality in Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Zambia, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

 

Western Michigan University looks to Brazil for new education partnerships

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Brazil is the next stop on Western Michigan University's conquest to be a globally-engaged university. WMU announced being one of 14 institutions that will participate in the Institute for International Education’s Academic Partnership Program in Brazil, which aims to connect WMU with Brazilian colleges and universities.

 

Kalamazoo College ranks No. 10 in nation for number of students studying abroad

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College is being named the top tenth baccalaureate college in the nation for the number of students studying abroad, climbing from 12th place last year in the Institute for International Education’s annual report.

 

Technology that gives instructors ability to monitor student reading raises privacy concerns

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A new breed of e-textbooks is giving educators an unprecedented level of insight into student reading habits, and the results have some experts wondering if the product compromises personal privacy. College e-textbook giant CourseSmart is piloting a new system that gives instructors previously unseen levels of access to how students interact with electronic course materials – what pages they read, how much time they spent reading, even what passages they highlighted.

Related story:

> MLIVE: Big Brother on campus? Students have mixed reaction to new e-textbook technology

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Q & A with Jordan Miller: University of Michigan's social media director talks about giving the school a voice

By Kellie Woodhouse

Universities can be slow to change. Yet with a quickly growing communications landscape, change — more specifically fast-paced change — is crucial if a college doesn't want to fall out of touch with its demographic and fall behind its competition.

 

Eastern Michigan University grads to don gowns made from recycled plastic bottles

By Kellie Woodhouse

Eastern Michigan University students will give a whole new meaning to "Go Green!" as they walk across the graduation stage in December. Students who graduate this winter will wear green gowns fashioned out of 23 recycled plastic bottles.

 

Two new faces to join the Eastern Michigan University Board of Regents

By Kellie Woodhouse

Gov. Rick Snyder has appointed a businesswoman and a risk manager to eight-year terms on Eastern Michigan University's eight-member Board of Regents. Mary Treder Lang, of Grosse Pointe Farms, and James "Jim" Webb, of Farmington, will join the board in January 2013. They replace Tom Sidlik and Roy Wilbanks, the current board chair and a former administrator of the Ypsilanti school.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

College Credit Eyed for Online Courses

By TAMAR LEWIN

While massive open online courses, or MOOCs, are still in their early days, the race has begun to integrate them into traditional colleges — by making them eligible for transfer credits, and by putting them to use in introductory and remedial courses.

Related story:

> WASHINGTON POST: Exploring credits for free online courses

 

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

As WSU kicks off presidential search, students, alums review their wish lists

By David Jesse

Frank Williams wants the next president of Wayne State University to keep tuition low. Wayne Coleman wants to see graduation rates increase. Williams, a sophomore at WSU and Coleman, an alumnus, echoed what many around the Midtown campus are hoping for as the university’s Board of Governors begins a nationwide search to replace retiring President Allan Gilmour.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: WSU starts search for next president

 

MLIVE

Learning suffers as number of part-time instructors grow at GRCC, faculty group says

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College is overly reliant on part-time faculty and needs to hire more permanent full-time instructors to maintain a quality learning environment, the head of the college’s faculty association told the board of trustees on Monday, Nov. 12.

 

Welding, CNC, machine tool accelerated certificates being offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College is now offering machine tool operator, CNC (Computer Numerical Control) operator, and welding certificates of achievements to help students find employment.

 

Michigan State top U.S. public university for study abroad, 9th in international student enrollment

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Michigan State University is one of the best public institutions in America in terms of overseas study and international student enrollment. For the eighth consecutive year, MSU's study abroad program sent more students to foreign places than any other public university in the U.S. with 2,577 studying overseas in the 2010-2012 school year.

 

NCAA data shed light on athlete graduation rates at West Michigan colleges

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Eighty-five percent of student athletes who started at Grand Valley State University in the 2005-06 school year graduated on time, giving the university the second highest Academic Success Rate among NCAA Division II colleges in Michigan. Data released last month by the NCAA show GVSU’s most recent ASR – similar to a federal graduation rate – increased by three percentage points over the previous year. For students who started in 1999-00, the rate was 78.

Related story:

> MLIVE: How graduation rates compare among student athletes at GVSU and Ferris State University

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Construction roundup: 6 new multimillion dollar University of Michigan projects to watch

By Kellie Woodhouse

Six multimillion dollar building expansion and renovation projects will be before the University of Michigan Board of Regents later this week. The projects will cost a combined $69.4 million and are expected to provide an average of 137 construction jobs, according to U-M estimates.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Foreign students flock to US in big numbers; MSU's population rose 8 percent last year

The number of international students enrolled at Michigan State University rose by 8 percent to a record 6,209 last year, with a substantial increase in the number of undergraduates from other countries, China, in particular, offsetting a decline in international graduate enrollment.

Related story:

> CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: US colleges, especially in Midwest, see record number of foreign students

 

Saturday-Monday, November 10-12, 2012

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Educational programs help learning disabled succeed in college

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Nationwide, only 10 percent of students who have learning disabilities go to college because they think they can’t do the work. What they don’t realize is that many universities and colleges provide special programs and/or services for students who have learning differences, said Tom Hoff, alumni and college guidance manager at Eton Academy in Birmingham that specializes in teaching students with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia or attention deficit disorder.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

'Dollar signs in uniform' Some for-profit schools take advantage of GI Bill veterans, wasting hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars without educating them.

By Jack Shakely

If ever there was a poster child for the law of unintended consequences, it is the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Down through the years, few government programs have enjoyed the almost universal approval of the GI Bill, enacted in 1944 and expanded in 1966. I'm one of its fans: It helped me buy my first home (a bungalow in Hermosa Beach) and sent me to law school. As the U.S. military became all volunteer in the 1970s and America enjoyed more than a quarter-century of peace, the GI Bill seemed less necessary and its benefits dwindled. The 1984 version of the bill, called the Montgomery GI Bill, looked more like a Roth IRA than a veteran's benefit, with a requirement that the serviceman or woman contribute $100 a month for up to a year while on active duty to qualify for post-active-duty educational benefits. The kicker was that you had to put your money in upfront and if you then decided not to go to college after you left the military, you lost your dough. A lot of vets said why bother.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Child’s Education, but Parents’ Crushing Loans

By TAMAR LEWIN

When Michele Fitzgerald and her daughter, Jenni, go out for dinner, Jenni pays. When they get haircuts, Jenni pays. When they buy groceries, Jenni pays. It has been six years since Ms. Fitzgerald — broke, unemployed and in default on the $18,000 in loans she took out for Jenni’s college education — became a boomerang mom, moving into her daughter’s townhouse apartment in Hingham, Mass.

 

How to Bridge the Hiring Gap

By ROBERT W. GOLDFARB

MANY newly minted college graduates are filled with anxiety, fearing that they won’t find decent jobs despite their knowledge and skills, and that they will never be free of tuition debt. At the same time, executives say they can’t find qualified applicants for a wide range of jobs. So, this fall, I talked to about a dozen C.E.O.’s in a variety of industries, along with more than 135 graduates, to try to get to the bottom of this paradox.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M program lets 3rd-graders be Wolverines for a day

The University of Michigan's K-grams program brought 60 students from Dicken Elementary in Ann Arbor and Dixon Educational Learning Academy in Detroit to U-M's campus for K-day on Friday. K-day is designed to allow students to experience a "day in the life of a Wolverine," as volunteers help inspire kids to pursue higher education by being a role model and tour guide.

 

WSU begins looking for new president to replace Allan Gilmour

By David Jesse

The Wayne State University Board of Governors is beginning the process to replace retiring President Allan Gilmour. The board will hold a special meeting at 11 a.m. Monday to form a search committee, the school said Friday. It is the first step in finding a permanent replacement for Gilmour, 78, who has announced he will retire at the end of the school year.

 

DETROIT NEWS

U.S. colleges look to foreign students for global perspective, profit

By Justin Pope

Ann Arbor -- Want to see how quickly the look and business model of American public universities are changing? Visit a place like Indiana University. Five years ago, there were 87 undergraduates from China on its idyllic, All-American campus in Bloomington. This year: 2,224. New figures out Monday show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest.

Related story:

> USA TODAY: Record number of foreign students in U.S.

 

MLIVE

President of West Michigan real estate investment company tapped as new chairman of Ferris State board

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Gary Granger has been selected as the new chairman of Ferris State University’s Board of Trustees. The board voted to appoint Granger to a two-year term as chair at its annual meeting late last month. Granger was first appointed to Ferris’ board in 2001 by former Gov. John Engler.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Rick Snyder announces cyber security facility at Eastern Michigan University

By The Associated Press

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has announced the opening of a facility at Eastern Michigan University designed to help electronic security professionals detect and prevent cyber threats and attacks. The Snyder administration said Friday that the Michigan Cyber Range initially will be housed at Eastern Michigan University. Additional sites are planned for Ferris State University and the 110th Airlift Wing in Battle Creek.

 

Friday, November 9, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University unveils sustainability project and research 'incubator' at former university bookstore site

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Bamboo plants are growing, bike wheels are turning, red wiggler worms are squirming and the staff and students of the Western Michigan University Office for Sustainability are glowing inside the newly renovated building off of Howard Street.  “When people ask me to give an elevator speech for sustainability, I ask them to take the stairs,” Director Harold Glasser said at a grand opening ceremony attended by 200 people on Thursday. “Solar panels and energy conservation is important but it’s more than that. It’s doing less with more by working with nature and fostering conditions for human flourishing.”

 

Ferris State University looking to promote undergraduate research

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- When it comes to teaching science, Ferris State University biology professor James Hoerter has a simple philosophy. “You learn science best when you do science,” said Hoerter, who’s taught at Ferris since 1993. “Traditionally, undergraduates haven’t had a lot of experience in doing research.”

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Broad museum promises to bring international art significance to MSU

By Matthew Miller

Eli Broad wasn’t interested in donating to an expansion of the Kresge Art Museum. The billionaire Michigan State University alumnus had given his alma mater the chance to make a pitch, working his way quickly through the classrooms and closets and galleries of the building that housed the museum on a mid-September day in 2004.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Yale’s Provost, Noted Psychology Scholar, Is Named President of the University

By ARIEL KAMINER

Yale University said Thursday that Peter Salovey, a celebrated scholar of psychology who has been its provost for the past four years, would be its new president. The appointment came less than three months after Richard C. Levin announced that he would be stepping down as president at the end of this academic year, after 20 years in the job.

 

Thursday, November 8, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Dems keep reins; voters help WCCCD

By David Jesse

Democrats retained control of the elected boards running the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University, while likely picking up a seat on the MSU board, unofficial returns showed. The races were so close in most instances, that it was difficult to call winners. Late results were still trickling in from some parts of Michigan on Wednesday, a day after Election Day.

Related stories:

> MLIVE: Democrats win seats on Michigan State, University of Michigan and Wayne State boards

> ANNARBOR.COM: Election 2012: Will new Democratic regents challenge tuition increases at University of Michigan?

 

MLIVE

Mark Delorey, WMU financial director, nationally recognized for role in developing foster care scholarship program

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University’s Director of Financial Aid Mark Delorey has received a national award for helping create the Seita Scholar program, which provides tuition and board for students who have aged out of the foster care system.

 

PORT HURON TIMES HERALD

Culinary program already cookin' -- Baker College showcases the program, director

By Holly Setter

PORT HURON TWP — . With deft twists of her wrist, Jill Tucker of St. Clair quickly scooped out balls of cantaloupe while her classmate Saengaroon Rhodes crafted a peacock’s tail from skewers of fruit.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Passage of Prop. 30 hailed by educators

By Howard Blume and Carla Rivera

With the passage of Proposition 30, college students will be spared another round of tuition increases and younger students will avoid a shorter school year, results that were met with much jubilation Wednesday. For public school districts, the measure's success was mostly about escaping another wave of severe budget cuts, including teacher layoffs, curtailed instructional time and larger classes. But for higher education, the measure is expected to reap immediate positive benefits.

 

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

 

MLIVE

Democrats win seats on University of Michigan and Wayne State boards, Michigan State race too close to call

By Melissa Anders

LANSING, MI — Democrats have won seats on the boards for University of Michigan and Wayne State University. The race for Michigan State University Board of Trustees is still too close to call. Well-known attorney Mark Bernstein of Ann Arbor and Dr. Shauna Ryder Diggs, a dermatologist in Detroit, won eight-year terms on the U-M Board of Regents. They defeated eight other candidates to replace Democrats Olivia Maynard and S. Martin Taylor.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Ex-Dean of St. John’s, on Trial for Stealing Over $1 Million, Is Found Dead at Home

By MOSI SECRET and WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

Hers was the kind of rise through the academic ranks that could have epitomized the American dream, if not for the way she crashed. Fresh from Taiwan in 1975, she enrolled at St. John’s University as a student in Asian studies, becoming a dean in just five years and, soon after, winning the ear of the university’s top echelon as she raised more than $20 million for the school.

 

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

 

MLIVE

Student loan expert offers tips to improve federal parent student loan program

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- While it’s important that parents continue to have relatively easy access to federal loans to help pay for their children’s education, there’s plenty that could be done to improve the government’s current program, according to one expert. Heather Jarvis, a Wilmington, N.C.-based lawyer specializing in student loans, said there’s several steps the government should take to improve the quality of parent PLUS loan program, which has grown substantially over the past decade as the price of college tuition continued to rise.

 

Federal auditors say GRCC lacks written drug and alcohol prevention policy

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College has been cited by federal auditors for lacking a policy that address the risks of drugs and alcohol, and for failing to measure the effectiveness of its substance abuse prevention programs. The findings, included in a U.S. Department of Education audit of GRCC’s financial aid program, say the college must revise its policies to remain in compliance with federal regulations.

 

Tightening lending standards for loans that help parents pay for their children’s education could reduce college access

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- While the number of parents in Michigan taking out federal loans to help their children cover the cost of college is going up, some advocates are reluctant to say lending standards should be tightened. “The government has provided these programs so that people who can’t just go out and get the funds on the private market or their savings accounts can still access education,” said Heather Jarvis, a Wilmington, N.C.-based lawyer specializing in student loans.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Local universities encourage students and staff to vote in Nov. 6 election

By Kellie Woodhouse

In the days leading up to the Nov. 6 general election, local universities have been encouraging their staffs and students to vote. "Make sure that you go out and vote," University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman told a group of staffers during a leadership breakfast last week. "Educate yourselves ... go and find out what these ballot proposals are all about; several of them would change the constitution of the state and that's a serious issue."

 

Saturday-Monday, November 3-5, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Grand Valley buys more property in Grand Rapids

By Associated Press

Grand Rapids — Grand Valley State University's Board of Trustees has approved spending $1.2 million to buy seven properties near its Health Sciences building in Grand Rapids.

As tuition soars at West Michigan colleges, so do loans taken out by parents to finance their children’s education.

Related story:

> MLIVE: GVSU plans $77 million in 2013 construction projects, buys more land near Grand Rapids Medical Mile

 

MLIVE

As tuition soars at West Michigan colleges, so do loans taken out by parents to finance their children’s education

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- As the price of college tuition continues to spiral upward, parents are increasingly shouldering the burden of their children’s education, a trend that’s leaving them swamped by debt as they approach retirement. The average amount borrowed by parents through a federal student loan program has grown by half or nearly doubled over the past decade at colleges and universities in West Michigan, according to data from the U.S. Department of Education.

 

New sustainability office grand opening scheduled for Nov. 8 at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — After months of renovations, the Western Michigan University’s Office for Sustainability is unveiling its new home on the corner of Howard Street and West Michigan Avenue. 

 

Friday, November 2, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Eastern Michigan University increases Detroit presence

By Associated Press

Ypsilanti — Eastern Michigan University is increasing its presence in Detroit with a new off-campus center on the city's northwest side. The Ypsilanti school says the facility is in a third-floor suite of rooms in a building across the street from Wayne County Community College's northwest campus.

 

MLIVE

More than $1 million saved by energy conservation at Kalamazoo Valley Community College

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College has saved more than $1 million during the past two years by conserving energy and is on track to reduce 18.2 million gallons of storm water runoff with a water treatment system.

 

Thursday, November 1, 2012

 

MLIVE

Three GVSU faculty participating in Fulbright Scholars program this year

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Three faculty members at Grand Valley State University were awarded Fulbright Scholarships this school year, placing the university among the top schools its size for the prestigious award.

 

WASHINGTON POST

The value of a college degree vs. the debt it takes to earn it

By Katherine Pilnick

Higher education becomes more expensive each and every year. Tuition costs rise twice as fast as typical inflation, making college less affordable for average Americans with every passing year. Faced with such high costs and near-universal financial hardship, students can find it difficult to determine whether college is actually worth the price tag.

 

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M to give $25,000 annually to help seniors with projects to change the world

By David Jesse

The University of Michigan will create a $25,000 stipend to be given annually to a graduating senior to help him or her pursue projects that could change the world. U-M President Mary Sue Coleman announced the program, to be named after U-M alumnus Raoul Wallenberg, on Tuesday during her annual leadership breakfast.

 

MLIVE

Eastern Michigan University to award $2.65M more in scholarship and grant money next year

By Kellie Woodhouse

Eastern Michigan University will set aside roughly $38.1 million for student scholarships and grants during the 2013-14 year. The school's eight-member Board of Regents unanimously approved the aid increase during its monthly meeting Tuesday.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Campus as Obstacle Course

By ROGER H. MARTIN

THE specially equipped Dodge Sprinter pulled into the Morningside College parking lot, transporting my campus guide and his Quickie 646 SE motorized wheelchair. Alex Watters was returning to this small liberal arts college in Sioux City, Iowa, for a wheelchair tour of the campus he had navigated as an undergraduate. Our mission was to understand some of the challenges faced by students with a physical disability for a book I was writing on the first-year college experience.

 

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

U-M's School of Music, Theatre & Dance gets $8M donation

By Michael H. Hodges

University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman announced Tuesday morning that the School of Music, Theatre & Dance received $8 million to help renovate and remodel its North Campus building. The gift comes from William K. and Delores S. Brehm, who've given the university $60 million in the past 10 years. William, a 1950 U-M alumnus, graduated with a degree in mathematics and physics.

Related story:

> ANNARBOR.COM: Cramped University of Michigan music school to receive $23M upgrade

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Mary Sue Coleman on U-M's safety overhaul, Coursera and how fundraising 'comes naturally'

By Kellie Woodhouse

A recent survey found that University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman was among the most beloved college presidents by faculty. On Monday Coleman met for a quick 30-minute chat with the faculty leaders of the Ann Arbor school.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

In Seattle, Virtual University Will Have a Physical Campus, Too

By KIRK JOHNSON

SEATTLE — With name tags clipped on and PowerPoint at the ready, officials from Northeastern University invited prospective students in one night last week for a peek at a new extension campus, 2,500 miles from the school’s home in Boston and about as far northwest as you can get in the lower 48 without swim fins. It is a trend that many colleges and universities have embraced in recent years — remote campuses to extend the brand and the flow of tuition checks.

 

Saturday-Monday, October 27-29, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

40 U-M students get Fulbright grants for 2012-13!

By Associated Press

Ann Arbor — The University of Michigan said 40 of its students have received Fulbright grants from the State Department for overseas education. The school announced Monday that more of the grants were awarded to its students than any other U.S. institution for the 2012-13 academic year. Harvard University is second with 31 recipients, and Brown University is third with 29.

 

MLIVE

Do universities need to do a better job preparing teachers?

By Dave Murray

MINNEAPOLIS – Sarah Henchey has been a middle school teacher for seven years and occasionally she runs into a student from her first class. “I tell them ‘I’m so sorry,’” Henchey told a group of education writers. “I was at the beginning of my career and I was still figuring out what to do.”

 

Learn about candidates for Michigan's university boards and state board of education

By Meegan Holland

It's hard enough to be informed about Michigan's six ballot proposals, let alone the candidates for Michigan's board of education and three universities who have elected boards.

 

Funding, college affordability among chief issues in Michigan State Board of Trustees election

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Like most of its counterparts across the state, Michigan State University faces financial challenges as funding from the Legislature has been reduced in recent years.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan admissions director talks about dos-and-don'ts of applying to college on Today Show

By Kellie Woodhouse

If you watched The Today Show Friday morning, you might have heard a familiar theme: the University of Michigan fight song. Undergraduate admissions director Ted Spencer was on the morning program at around 8:36 a.m., talking about the dos-and-don'ts of the college application process with fellow admissions officials from Johns Hopkins University and Vanderbilt University.

 

DTE Energy installing field of solar panels on University of Michigan's North Campus

By Kellie Woodhouse

Workers have started installing an array of solar panels at University of Michigan's North Campus Research Complex. The project —which will generate enough energy to power about 100 homes— began earlier this week.

 

Friday, October 26, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

WSU breaks ground for $93-million research building

By David Jesse

As Wayne State University professor Sylvie Naar-King works on a $5.7-million effort to combat obesity in Detroit's children, she faces an obstacle -- the members of her team aren't even housed in the same building. They are scattered in offices across the campus because there isn't space to house them in one location.

Related story:

> MLIVE: Two board seats up for statewide election at pivotal time for Wayne State University

 

MLIVE

Failing financial investments has Calvin College eyeing program cuts

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A series of faltering investments has Calvin College facing a budget shortfall by 2017, a scenario administrators expect to remedy by selling real estate holdings, eliminating academic programs and services, and reducing spending.

 

Thursday, October 25, 2012

 

MLIVE

Pontiac schools interim superintendent Walter Burt to lead WMU's education college

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Western Michigan University has appointed Walter Burt to serve as the interim dean of the College of Education and Human Development. Burt is an associate professor of educational leadership, research and technology, who has an extensive background in urban K-12 education. He replaces Van Cooley, who had been serving as interim dean until his sudden death in July.

 

Princeton Review names SVSU 'outstanding business school'

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — Saginaw Valley State University earned some attention for its College of Business and Management. The Saginaw County-based university was named an outstanding business school by the Princeton Review’s “The Best 296 Business Schools: 2013 Edition.”

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan gives food composting a try at the Michigan League

By Kellie Woodhouse

Not going to finish those fries? No problem. The University of Michigan is piloting a food composing program.

 

Enrollment trends: Out-of-state students form 42.6 percent of University of Michigan's freshman class

By Kellie Woodhouse

The number of out-of-state students at University of Michigan's Ann Arbor campus has risen over the past decade. Out-of-state and international students now comprise 42.6 percent of this fall's freshman class, outpacing non-resident enrollment levels of recent history.

 

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

8 Michigan universities see jump in enrollment

By David Jesse

Despite intentionally shrinking its entering class of freshmen, the University of Michigan posted a 1.7% increase in total enrollment this year, numbers released Tuesday show. Overall, U-M has 43,426 students at its Ann Arbor campus. That's up 710 students from last fall.

Related stories:

> DETROIT NEWS: University of Michigan sees enrollment rise again

> ANNARBOR.COM: University of Michigan shrinks freshman class but grows overall fall 2012 enrollment to 43,426

 

EDUCATION WEEK

Community Colleges Rethink Placement Tests

By Caralee J. Adams

College-placement tests can make or break a student's career. Yet few students prepare for them, and there's little evidence to suggest the tests even do what they're designed to do. Now, some community colleges are looking for alternatives. Some are switching to high school grades or revamping assessments, while others are working with high schools to figure out students' college readiness early so they have time to catch up if necessary.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Pace of tuition hikes slows at four-year public colleges

By Larry Gordon

Average college tuition again rose faster than inflation this year, but the 4.8% increase at four-year state schools nationwide was the smallest rise in more than a decade, according to a College Board study released Wednesday. The report also emphasized that hefty financial aid significantly cut college bills for many students and that loan burdens were not as large as many people feared.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: Report Says College Prices, Once Stable, Are Up Again

 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

 

MLIVE

University of Phoenix closing could create business opportunity at Portage's Trade Centre, landlord said

By Ursula Zerilli

PORTAGE, MI – The owners of the Trade Centre in Portage say they are not worried about finding a new tenant to replace The University of Phoenix in the Portage office complex, and they are having "active discussion" to locate a restaurant in the building. The University of Phoenix announced it is closing 115 locations, including eight of 10 locations in Michigan, last week. The closings will impact 13,000 students across the country this week and 190 students attending classes at the center in Portage, located at 950 Trade Centre.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan shrinks freshman class but grows overall fall 2012 enrollment to 43,426

By Kellie Woodhouse

Students enjoy warm weather on the Diag at University of Michigan this fall.

 Although University of Michigan freshmen enrollment decreased slightly this fall, the Ann Arbor campus enrolled more graduates and undergraduates than ever before. Total enrollment at the university is 43,426, a 1.7 percent increase that marks the largest student body in university history.

 

Staff survey: Mary Sue Coleman among most popular college presidents

By Kellie Woodhouse

The Huffington Post reports that University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman received a 94 percent approval rating in a recent Glassdoor.com survey sent to university employees throughout the country.

 

Saturday-Monday, Oct. 20-22, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Millages would support community education

By David Jesse

Community colleges in Wayne and Macomb counties are asking voters in November to approve property tax increases. The Wayne County Community College District is seeking a 1-mill increase in its operating millage, while Macomb Community College is asking voters to OK a $56-million bond issue for building and technology improvements.

 

Adrian College shows growth with business model

By Leanne Smith, Associated Press

ADRIAN — On a sunny September day, the area of campus Adrian College calls "the mall" is alive with students hurrying across manicured lawns toward classes, a modern library or the terraced patio of the student center. The mood is energetic and vibrant, as the college this fall has welcomed its largest-ever incoming class of 650 students and total enrollment of 1,755 students.

 

Detroit Free Press Endorsement: Wayne County Community College District

You can count Wayne County Community College District among the institutions that thought they had a solid long-term financial plan -- until the housing market collapsed. Now, after losing nearly $30 million in annual property tax revenue since the housing peak, the community college has little choice but to ask voters for more support, in the form of one additional mill for the next 10 years.

 

Detroit Free Press Endorsement: Macomb County Community College

Macomb County Community College is dealing with its financial needs via a proposal for $56 million in borrowing to refurbish its buildings and technology. Voters should say yes to the plan, which will raise property taxes by up to 0.19 of a mill annually for the next decade.

 

MLIVE

Calvin College inaugurates its 10th president, Michael Le Roy

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Michael Le Roy was inaugurated Saturday, Oct. 20 as the 10th president of Calvin College. Le Roy, who was officially hired in June, told an estimated 2,000 people about the history of the college, its place within the Christian Reformed Church and what path the institution will take as it contends with the changing landscape of higher education.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan regent candidates say college cost, student debt key issues in 2012 race

By Kellie Woodhouse

The two people who get elected to the University of Michigan Board of Regents in November will have the power to affect one of the hot-button issues of this election cycle: the cost of college. When President Barack Obama visited Ann Arbor in January, he chastised colleges for "skyrocketing" tuition and told schools, "You can’t assume that you’ll just jack up tuition every single year."

 

University of Michigan launches new security and police division in response to six-month child porn reporting delay

By Kellie Woodhouse

Public safety and security at University of Michigan is getting an immediate makeover. U-M regents unanimously approved the creation of a Division of Public Safety and Security during their Friday meeting in Flint. The new division is a response to an external investigation of a six-month reporting lapse by at least eight university officials who knew a U-M Health System resident was suspected of viewing child pornography while at work but did not notify police.

 

Friday, October 19, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M scientist wins $875,000 Packard grant, will study prehistoric ice in Greenland

By Patricia Montemurri

ANN ARBOR -- This week, an $875,000 jackpot fell into the lap of University of Michigan assistant professor Sarah Aciego. She is one of 16 academics from across the country who won a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering through the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

 

Race-based admissions key to educating urban students, Syracuse University leader says

By David Jesse

The best way for America to improve its cities is to educate those who live in them, Nancy Cantor, the chancellor at Syracuse University, told a conference this morning at the University of Michigan. And the best way to do that is for universities to be allowed to use race in its admissions policies. But that ability is under attack, Cantor noted, and could possibly end as a result of a landmark Supreme Court case heard earlier this month. In that case, Fisher v. University of Texas – Austin, the justices are looking at a University of Texas program that is used to help fill the last quarter or so of its incoming freshman classes. Race is one of many factors considered by admissions officers. The rest of the roughly 7,100 freshman spots automatically go to Texans who graduated in the top 8% of their high school classes.

 

MLIVE

GVSU students create 'zero waste' initiative for football games

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Looking to boost recycling, Grand Valley State University is launching what it’s calling a zero waste initiative at its home football games. The initiative, being launched for this weekend’s homecoming game against Northwood University, will increase the number of recycle and compost bins on campus and parking lots where fans tailgate.

 

WMU Sky Broncos qualify to compete in national NIFA competition in May

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI –Western Michigan University’s Sky Broncos flight team took third place in the National Intercollegiate Flying Association Region III competition, which means the Broncos will be competing in the national competition from May 6-13 at Ohio State University.

 

Kalamazoo College president addresses college affordability and the value of liberal arts degree during annual update

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College President Eileen Wilson-Oyelaran focused on college affordability, the importance of a liberal arts degree and briefed alumni on recent developments during an annual Homecoming update, released on YouTube on Wednesday. Besides touting the college’s many achievements, such as being included in the 2011 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll and ranked among the best in Washington Monthly’s recent reports, she also coolly nudged University of Michigan.

 

University of Phoenix announces plans to phase out East Lansing campus

By Angela Wittrock

EAST LANSING, MI –  The University of Phoenix is phasing out its brick-and-mortar classroom instruction, with plans to eventually close 115 campuses nationwide, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday. Eight of the 10 campuses in Michigan are slated to be phased out, including the East Lansing campus, located at 3100 West Road, near the intersection of Lake Lansing and Coolidge roads.

 

Thursday, October 18, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Debt for new grads on rise

By Justin Pope, Associated Press

It's the latest snapshot of the growing burden of student debt and it's another discouraging one: Two-thirds of the national college class of 2011 finished school with loan debt, and those who borrowed walked off the graduation stage owing on average $26,600 — up about 5 percent from the class before.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: Student-Loan Borrowers Average $26,500 in Debt

 

University of Phoenix to close eight Michigan locations

By the Associated Press

University of Phoenix plans to close eight of its 10 Michigan locations as part of a broader effort to phase out some of its campuses and learning centers. MLive.com reports it wasn't immediately known how many jobs in Michigan would be affected.

Related stories:

> MLIVE: University of Phoenix closing 8 locations in Michigan; all West Michigan facilities to be phased out

> NEW YORK TIMES: University of Phoenix to Shutter 115 Locations

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University to offer in-state tuition to all U.S. military veterans

With a student population that already includes more than 300 U.S. military veterans, Oakland University will open its doors still wider to men and women who have honorably served their country.

 

MLIVE

GRCC responds to pricing and scheduling concerns raised by MLive reader

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Paying for a college education has long been a challenge for students, especially those who don’t qualify for free financial aid or receive scholarships. That’s the situation one MLive reader faced while pursuing an associate degree at Grand Rapids Community College. With children at home and unwilling to take on debt, emkode pursued an education in a way few other students do – stretching it over 20 years.

 

Kalamazoo College homecoming festivities to bring more than 1,000 alumni to campus

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The orange and black attire and flags found in Kalamazoo this weekend will have little to do with Halloween when more than 1,000 Kalamazoo College graduates are returning to their alma mater to celebrate Homecoming, from Oct. 19 -21.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan seeking input on revamped sexual misconduct policy

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan is seeking feedback on an updated sexual misconduct policy officials have spent eight months drafting. The first of four meetings on the new policy, which isn't yet implemented, will be held 5 p.m. Wednesday at the Northwood Community Center on north campus.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Rising College Costs Pose Test for Obama on Education Policies

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

In campaign stops across college campuses, and again in the debate on Tuesday, President Obama has promoted his efforts to make college more affordable. His record, more activist than any recent predecessor’s, includes greatly expanding the federal government’s role in granting college loans, increasing aid to community colleges, and even taking steps to try to stem soaring tuition.

 

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

 

MLIVE

Closing Hoekje and Bigelow halls begins WMU master plan to renovate all housing and dining facilities

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – On the west side of Western Michigan University’s Hoekje Hall, the initials of 27 residence hall assistants – “The Keepers of Hoekje Hall” – are scribbled in black marker on a third-floor brick wall behind the metal casing of a service elevator. It’s a tradition for RAs who have access to the elevator that fourth floor resident assistant Samantha Marvin will be among the last to preserve. As sad as Marvin is about the impending closure of the dormitory she’s lived in for two years, she admits it’s cool that she could be the last to sign the brick. The oldest initials are from 2004.

 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

9 charged in NIU inquiry into selling of scrap

By Jodi S. Cohen

Nine current and former Northern Illinois University employees were charged with felonies Tuesday in an alleged scheme to sell university scrap materials and deposit the proceeds in a private bank account.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

More community college students commuting to multiple campuses

By Carla Rivera

Norphesa Jones rises before dawn twice a week to take a 6 a.m. physical education class at Southwest College, just blocks from her home in South Los Angeles. She then takes a bus to the Green Line, catches the train and another bus to Los Angeles Trade Tech downtown for an 8:30 a.m. math class. Jones then backtracks to Southwest for a personal development class that begins at 11:10 a.m.

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

 

MLIVE

CMU researchers detect Asian carp, zebra mussels with inexpensive technology

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — There is a piece of inexpensive technology Central Michigan University researchers are using to detect invasive species in freshwater. CMU Biology Professor Andrew Mahon is using laser transmission spectroscopy, which  provides real-time, DNA-based testing to find Asian carp and zebra mussels.

 

WMU College of Aviation turns to technology to shape future; performing federal research on lowering industry costs

By Ursula Zerilli

BATTLE CREEK, MI –The Federal Aviation Administration is tapping into Western Michigan University's College of Aviation program to find industry training and cost solutions. The college is tackling the nation-wide research task by investing in technology.

 

Students connect with West Michigan manufacturers at job fair

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A tooling and manufacturing student at Grand Rapids Community College, Joshua King wants to make sure his investment in higher education pays off. Most of King’s bills at GRCC are being covered by federal student aid, but he spends a lot of time and energy on schoolwork. He wants to be sure the degree he’s pursuing will lead to a job upon graduation.

 

Federal report details borrower roadblocks in private student loan market

By Brian McVicar

 GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A federal report released today paints a critical picture of the private student loan market, saying borrowers have few repayment options, struggle to work with their lenders and have a hard time figuring out what they owe. The report, released by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is based upon 2,900 complaints on private student loans the agency has received since March.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Michigan college savings plans get 'silver' rating

By Mark Jewell

Boston — College savings plans offered through the states of Alaska, Maryland, Nevada and Utah earned top marks from Morningstar Inc. in the company's annual update to ratings of so-called 529 plans. Another four plans — including Michigan's state-sponsored plan — received second-rung silver-medal ratings from Morningstar, which found that many of plans reduced fees and improved investment options during the past 12 months.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Well-Off Will Benefit Most From Change to Student Debt Relief Plan, Study Says

By ANDREW MARTIN

With nearly one in six student loan borrowers in default, the federal government is making changes to its income-based repayment plan to help borrowers with relatively high debt and low incomes keep up with their payments. But a report that will be released on Tuesday by the New America Foundation, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy institute, says the changes ultimately will provide only marginal help for low-income borrowers who are at the greatest risk of default.

 

Saturday-Monday, October 13-15, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Michigan's universities learn as they expand their presence on social media

By David Jesse

Anisha Patel reached a milestone a couple of weeks into her freshman year at the University of Michigan: She remembered how to get around Angell Hall, a fact she quickly tweeted out along with her other daily observations. And her tweet didn't just go to her friends, but to nearly 2,000 curious U-M followers on Twitter during her week at the keyboard of the @umichstudents account, an account that rotates among the university's students.

 

MLIVE

Hope College holds groundbreaking on $3.7 million Haworth Engineering Center

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Hope College administrators and Holland community leaders gathered today for a ceremonial groundbreaking for the college’s Haworth Engineering Center, a $3.7 million addition to VanderWerf Hall that’s expected to open in fall 2013.

 

What Calvin College staff and students are trying to accomplish by snapping hundreds of photos around campus today

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A lot can happen in day at Calvin College – and faculty and staff are urging students to join them as they document it for a social media initiative. The college’s communications and marketing department today launched “Calvin in 24,” a Facebook page where students, faculty and staff can submit photos showing what they’re up to on Friday, Oct. 12.

 

How GRCC's student success rate compares with the statewide average

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College lags behind the statewide average for students who graduated or earned a certificate within a six-year period, but administrators are hopeful recent academic changes will boost the college’s performance.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

In Bedroom Community, Birth of a Tech Center

By SARAH MASLIN NIR

A canopy of solar cells, a nearly classroom-free academic center, cafes open to the public and even a hotel. The new campus of the Cornell University graduate school for technology is expected to transform Roosevelt Island from a sleepy bedroom community into a high-technology hothouse, and indeed, the plans to be formally unveiled for the campus on Monday bear little resemblance to anything that is there now.

 

Friday, October 12, 2012

 

MACOMB DAILY

Macomb Community College President Jim Jacobs: College enhances community

By Frank DeFrank

Macomb Community College President Jim Jacobs believes the institution is well-regarded by county residents. But whether those residents will dig into their pockets to demonstrate that regard remains to be seen.

 

MLIVE

SVSU earns $26,185 MDEQ grant for Kawkawlin River research

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — Saginaw Valley State University received a grant from Michigan Department of Environmental Quality to research the Kawkawlin River in Bay County. The university will use the $26,185 grant to examine why northern sections of the river fail to meet Michigan water quality standards for dissolved oxygen.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

How tougher classes in high school can help kids make it through college

By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo

About 4 out of 10 students at four-year colleges fail to earn a degree within six years – and timely completion rates at two-year schools are even lower. But what if high schools had a better recipe for preparing their students to stay in college? The National School Boards Association released a study Thursday afternoon highlighting some key ingredients: more advanced math courses, challenging courses such as Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB), and better academic advising.

 

USA TODAY

Editorial: Keep schools' right to limited use of race

The Supreme Court's conservative majority has made little secret of its disdain for affirmative action plans in education. That's true whether they're used to help integrate K-12 schools or to decide who gets into colleges and graduate schools. In a 2007 case, Chief Justice John Roberts famously wrote that "the way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race."

Related story:

> USA TODAY: Opposing view: 'Racial balancing' ignores inequalities

 

Thursday, October 11, 2012

 

MLIVE

Perfect pass rate on nursing test places Hope College in elite company

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- For the second year in a row, every Hope College graduate who took a national test to become a registered nurse passed on their first try, an achievement that places the college among the top schools nationwide, administrators say.

 

Why GVSU thinks renting cars by the hour will be a hit with students

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Getting around West Michigan could become a bit easier for Grand Valley State University students who don’t own a car. The university on Oct. 15 will launch a partnership with WeCar, a service owned by Enterprise car rental company that allows customers to rent a vehicle by the hour, said

 

EDUCATION WEEK

Justices Weigh Race in Texas Admissions

By Mark Walsh

Conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court came out aggressively today against the race-conscious admissions plan at the University of Texas at Austin, while liberals raised jurisdictional issues and defended affirmative action. Somewhere in the middle was Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who asked several questions that appeared skeptical of the plan.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: Justices Weigh Race as Factor at Universities

 

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University to break ground on medical school renovations Friday

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Western Michigan University will have a groundbreaking ceremony for the renovation of its School of Medicine on Friday, Oct. 12, at the downtown building. In December, Mattawan-based MPI Research donated a 330,000 square-foot facility at 300 Portage St. to the university.

 

Fellowships help students document Michigan's philanthropic history

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- An effort by Grand Valley State University to document the history of Michigan’s philanthropic community is getting a boost, thanks to three new student fellowships. The fellowships – named after two former administrators at GVSU’s Johnson Center for Philanthropy – are being used by students to work on the university’s “Our State of Generosity” project, an interactive website that will showcase the history of Michigan’s foundation and nonprofit organizations, as well as lessons in how to develop philanthropic efforts.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

2 court battles on affirmative action could affect admissions at Michigan schools

By David Jesse

Nearly a decade ago, attorneys representing the University of Michigan stood in front of the U.S. Supreme Court defending how the school used race in its admissions decisions. The result was a landmark ruling governing race and universities. The high court upheld the U-M law school's use of race as a consideration in admissions, as long as there was no quotas attached, but threw out the undergraduate admissions system that awarded extra points to African-American, Hispanic and American Indian students.

Related stories:

> CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: Supreme Court: If affirmative action is banned, what happens at colleges?

> USA TODAY: Supreme Court to weigh in again on affirmative action

 

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

High court looks at race in college admissions

By Mark Sherman, Associated Press

Washington — Nine years after the Supreme Court said colleges and universities can use race in their quest for diverse student bodies, the justices have put this divisive social issue back on their agenda in the middle of a presidential election campaign. Nine years is a blink of the eye on a court where justices can look back two centuries for legal precedents. But with an ascendant conservative majority, the high court in arguments Wednesday will weigh whether to limit or even rule out taking race into account in college admissions.

Related stories:

> LOS ANGELES TIMES: A high-stakes battle for higher education

> NEW YORK TIMES: Race and College Admissions, Facing a New Test by Justices

 

MLIVE

Jackson Community College Board approves $3.7 million in cuts that include layoffs, closing of downtown Jackson center

By Leanne Smith

SUMMIT TWP., MI – Jackson Community College will close its downtown Jackson center, give layoff notices to 14 support personnel and stop additional construction at its North Campus to offset revenue lost due to declining enrollment. With a 6-1 vote, the college’s Board of Trustees on Monday approved about $3.7 million in budget reductions for the 2012-13 year. Trustee Phil Hoffman cast the dissenting vote, saying his priorities don’t match those presented by President Dan Phelan.

 

Kalamazoo Valley Community College launching manufacturing training program in January

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – With a new name and starting date, Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s Mechatronics Systems Technician Academy will officially be launched in January. This training program, previously called the ‘Mechatronics Academy’, aims to prepare students for a career in installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting mechanical and electrical equipment that is controlled by electronic and computer driven components.

 

Have you taken out federal loans to help pay for your children's college education

By Brian McVicar

As college tuition grew by leaps and bounds over the past decade, so did the number of parents who took out loans to help finance their children’s education – an event that has left some families drowning in debt. The federal loan program for parents, known as Parent Plus, has grown at colleges both here in West Michigan and throughout the nation.

 

Saturday-Monday, October 6-8, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Beware, metro Detroit: The feds are out -- and looking for payback on late student loans

By David Jesse

Dave Blume stopped paying on his college student loan six months ago. Now, the 29-year-old Detroiter doesn't like to answer his phone, answer the door, or even open his mail. "They are going to catch up with me at some point," he said. "I just hope to make some money to start paying it off before that happens." He has reason to worry.

Related stories:

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Vocational schools see highest rate of defaults on loans

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Find student loan default rates for Michigan schools and who's being hit with lawsuits

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Ferris State searches for solutions to student debt crisis

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Hundreds in Michigan sued over thousands that they owe in delinquent student loans

 

DETROIT NEWS

'Critical mass' key to affirmative action case

By Justin Pope

Austin, Texas — Walking across the South Mall, or scanning the football stadium's 100,000 seats on game day, University of Texas admissions director Kedra Ishop sees how much has changed since the 1990s, when she was a black student at what was an inordinately white school. This giant flagship campus — once so slow to integrate — is now awash in color, among the most diverse in the country if not the world. The student body, like Texas, is majority-minority.

 

MLIVE

Filling out forms for financial aid was a lot tougher when I went to college

By Al Jones

KALAMAZOO, MI — It was the first time in life that I can say I considered kissing a man. If I had been nearer to the front of Kalamazoo Central High School’s main auditorium, I very well may have jumped up on the stage and kissed Bob Jorth full on the mouth.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

U-M head of research Stephen Forrest discusses the university's $1.27B research budget, its importance to Ann Arbor and 3,000 talking cars

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan has the largest federally-sponsored research enterprise of any American public university. Yet the school's Vice President for Research Stephen Forrest is quick to caution that the bulk of research and development funding might stagnate or grow slower next year as the federal government works to reduce spending.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Emory Confronts a Legacy of Bias Against Jews

By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN

Early in the summer of 1952, after his first year of dental school at Emory University in Atlanta, Perry Brickman received a letter from the dean. It informed him that he had flunked out.

 

Friday, October 5, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Jesse Jackson urges college students in Detroit to vote in November

By Melanie Scott Dorsey

As the Rev. Jesse Jackson urged Wayne County Community College District students on Thursday to vote in November's election, his speech took on the characteristics of a fiery Sunday sermon. At times, the crowd of more than 100 students clapped and repeated the phrases, "I am somebody," "Stop the violence. Save the children," and "I will vote in person." A student in the front row waved a tambourine when Jackson made his key points.

 

MLIVE

Aquinas College’s new fundraising chief: “All the stars are aligned for us”

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Greg Meyer has been tapped to lead fundraising and alumni relations at Aquinas College, a position that’s key to the institution’s effort to provide student financial aid and campus improvements. As Vice President for Institutional Advancement, Meyer will work to create and strengthen relationships with alumni and oversee campaigns to fund scholarships and campus building and improvement projects.

 

Grand Rapids Community College to receive $166,000 federal science grant

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College’s chemistry program is getting a boost, thanks to a federal grant that will be used to purchase new equipment, train faculty and hold summer camps for high school students. Close to half the $166,214 grant from the National Science Foundation will be used to purchase an instrument that can more quickly analyze complex chemical mixtures, giving students the ability to perform new types of experiments.

 

Western Michigan University bookstore struggles to compete with online companies; considers outsourcing management

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University’s bookstore is struggling to compete with major companies that sell textbooks cheap online and is considering outsourcing management to cut costs. “The challenge in the market is that all of these online companies are taking away a lot of business, like Barnes & Nobles or Follet,” said Sandra Steinbach, WMU’s associate vice president for business and finance. “We have to buy books at individual levels. If you can buy at national prices, you can get a better price than a local bookstore that only sells to the local community. They offer better pricing.”

 

Thursday, October 4, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Recovering from cancer, WSU president gets help to run school

By David Jesse

Wayne State University President Allan Gilmour is officially cancer-free, but he is still battling side effects from medicine he's on. Fatigue, along with some dizziness and an occasional struggle with focusing, has him out of the office on a regular basis. On Wednesday, Gilmour announced he is appointing Phyllis Vroom, retired dean of WSU School of Social Work, as deputy president to help him run the university.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Wayne State names deputy president to help Gilmour

 

Wayne State University faculty tells board: Contract dispute is hurting school's reputation

By David Jesse

Contentious labor contract talks between Wayne State University and its faculty -- especially discussions about tenure -- are harming the university's reputation, faculty members told the WSU Board of Governors on Wednesday. Hundreds of faculty packed the boardroom and spilled into the hallway. Speakers blasted the administration for not being able to come to an agreement with the union. As each speaker finished, loud, sustained applause erupted.

 

MLIVE

GRCC takes fresh approach to keep students from failing remedial classes

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College may have found a novel way to help more students pass developmental education classes: Speed them up. Long plagued by a high failure rate, the college is now offering some students the opportunity to bypass at least one of their semester-long developmental classes in reading, math and English by completing them in a condensed three-week period.

 

Davenport University hopes new vice president will boost giving

By Brian McVicar

CALEDONIA TOWNSHIP, MI -- Davenport University has selected Peg Luy as its Executive Vice President for Advancement, a position in which she’ll be responsible for helping boost fundraising and building relationships with alumni.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan considered among top 20 colleges in the world in London-based ranking

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan was dubbed the 20th-best university in the world in the recently released Times Higher Education rankings.  The Ann Arbor-based school has slipped down the World University Rankings in recent years, ranking 18th in 2011 and 15th in 2010.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Community colleges' crisis slows students' progress to a crawl

By Stephen Ceasar

The first course Charity Hansen is taking as a freshman at Pasadena City College is a basic class on managing time, speaking up in discussions, setting ambitious goals and then going after them. If only she could.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Benefits Seen in Considering Income for College Admissions

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Giving college applicants preference based on socioeconomic factors, rather than race, is comparable to affirmative action in achieving racial diversity, and superior in helping people who are disadvantaged, according to a study released on Wednesday.

 

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Study: Race-neutral admissions can work

By Justin Pope, Associated Press

As the Supreme Court revisits the use of race in college admissions next week, critics of affirmative action are hopeful the justices will roll back the practice. A new report out Wednesday offers a big reason for their optimism: evidence from at least some of the nine states that don't use affirmative action that leading public universities can bring meaningful diversity to their campuses through race-neutral means.

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University students weigh study abroad options at fair

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – After moving to Germany twice as a child, 26-year-old Jonathon Jackson has always wanted to return. Jackson, a bio-medical sciences senior who serves in the U.S. Army, said returning to Germany will be easier than he imagined after attending the Western Michigan University study abroad affair on Tuesday.

 

With more than one in 10 recent student loan borrowers in default, see how West Michigan colleges stack up

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Michigan residents continue to struggle to repay federal student loans, with more than one in 10 recent borrowers going into default, according to federal data. The trend, driven by a sluggish economy that has left many graduates unable to find work, comes as student debt has climbed to roughly $1 trillion dollars and become part of the national conversation on higher education.

 

CMU aims to decrease 54 percent 6-year graduation rate by joining national initiative

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — More than half of students at Central Michigan University graduate with a bachelor's degree in six years. The university is joining an initiative with more than 450 public colleges and universities nationwide to develop strategies to reduce the time for students to earn a four-year degree and control costs for students.

 

Report: Lake Michigan College plans $1.3 million renovation at Niles campus

By Ursula Zerilli

NILES, MI – Lake Michigan College is planning a $1.3 million renovation to existing space at the Bertrand Crossing campus for science labs and general classrooms by fall 2013.  The South Bend Tribune reports that the Board of Trustees approved the renovation last week.

 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Illinois prepaid college tuition program back in business

By Jodi S. Cohen

Illinois families can again enroll in the state's prepaid college tuition program, a year after it was suspended amid questions about investment strategy and a funding shortfall. The College Illinois program, with about 52,000 participants, allows families to buy contracts that lock in today's prices for future tuition and fees at the state's public universities.

 

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Wayne State University, faculty union extend contract 2 weeks while talks continue

By David Jesse

The contract between Wayne State University and its faculty union has been extended two weeks, but the sides are still far apart on economic issues when it comes to signing a new labor agreement. The union asked for a one-year contract that had a raise of 3% for everyone in the union and an additional 2% for some in the union.

 

MSU professor hospitalized after shouting at class, reportedly stripping naked

By David Jesse

A Michigan State University professor was hospitalized in protective custody after reportedly stripping down naked in his class and screaming. MSU’s police department said they took a call around 1 p.m. today about a man in the MSU Engineering Building shouting and screaming in the hallway. Police are not identifying the professor.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Michigan State professor hospitalized after outburst

 

MLIVE

WMU students kick off Homecoming Week with donations, burritos

By Ursula Zerilli

At least 100 students from 22 student-run organizations collected non-perishable items for Kalamazoo Loaves & Fishes and Communities in Schools of Kalamazoo on Monday. They positioned their donations into creative "canstructions" in hopes of winning cash prizes for bringing the best donations during the first student homecoming event of the week. Students also began voting for a Homecoming King and Queen on Monday.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Economic research institute dubs Ann Arbor No. 1 small city to attend college

By Kellie Woodhouse

Hold on to your hats Ann Arborites— your lovely town has topped yet another ranking. The American Institute for Economic Research has ranked Ann Arbor, home to University of Michigan, the No. 1 small metro area to attend college.

 

THE DAILY BEAST

NYU Professor: Are Student Loans Immoral?

By Andrew Ross

Straight talk about the crushing burden of student debt is everywhere—except the one place it should be: on college campuses themselves. Students, professors, and college administrators seem to be in denial. For students who have never managed their own finances before—certainly the vast majority of undergraduates—the silence isn’t so surprising. After all, they’re not required to pay a penny on their loans until they graduate, so they coast along, often blind to the consequences of their ballooning debts. And our college presidents and senior administrators have good reason to duck any responsibility for the gathering crisis: all the evidence shows that they’ve gotten steadily richer from the proceeds of the higher-education bubble.

 

Saturday-Monday, September 29-October 1, 2012

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Local universities see increase in enrollment, while area community colleges decrease

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland University and many others around the state are seeing an increase in enrollment, especially in the number of transfer students from area community colleges. For example, Oakland University, Lawrence Technological University, Rochester College, Michigan State University and Eastern Michigan University are among those that have seen an increase in enrollment, while Oakland Community College reported a decrease this year.

 

New Lawrence Tech president Moudgil to engage students in research, increase enrollment, add professors, improve facilities

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

New Lawrence Technological University President Virinder Moudgil received a standing ovation after board President Lloyd Reuss placed a medallion with the seal of the university over his shoulders during inauguration ceremonies. Moudgil was invested as seventh president of the private Lawrence Technological University Thursday evening after a formal procession of faculty wearing colorful hoods over the caps and gowns of their alma maters.

 

Oakland University students complain about crowded parking areas on campus

By MEGAN SEMERAZ

When Oakland University students began the new semester, none of them probably expected they’d have to cross Walton Boulevard’s several lanes of traffic to get to class. But that’s what some OU students are choosing to do — park their cars across the street in business parking lots because they say the university doesn’t have enough parking.

 

MLIVE

$60-million Sangren Hall completion celebrated by Western Michigan University and political leaders

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Guests walked past rows of Western Michigan University students holding Bronco flags as they entered the front doors of the New Paul V. Sangren Hall on Friday night during the formal celebration of the university’s recent building additions and pedestrian mall. The university officially welcomed the community to see the completion of the 230,000-square-foot facility that now contains the College of Education and Human Development and the Department of Sociology.

 

Free seminar eases adults back into college; counts for credit at Lake Michigan College

By Ursula Zerilli

BENTON HARBOR, MI – Lake Michigan College is offering a free seminar to help adults ease back into college. If completed, the five-week seminar translates into one credit, which usually costs $81 for in-district students, towards the individual’s first semester.

 

Western Herald, WMU student newspaper, switches to monthly print cycle, goes web-first

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University’s student newspaper, the Western Herald, is going web-first and will go from publishing a print edition once a week to printing once a month. The changes come as a way to curb costs and better equip students for a career in a changing news industry, said general manager Richard Junger. The first print edition of the Western Herald for this semester will be available early next week.

 

MSU campus trips for Grand Rapids elementary students gives them a glimpse of college life

By Monica Scott

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - Over the last four years, about 500 Grand Rapids schools students have taken a campus trip to Michigan State University, not just to tailgate and see a football game but to be exposed to student life and the concept of going to college. About 180 third- and fourth-grade students from Burton and Sibley elementaries, Martin Luther King Jr. Leadership Academy, and Harrison Park made the trip to East Lansing last Saturday.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Michigan Memories: University of Michigan's Hill Auditorium turns 100

By Kellie Woodhouse

Hill Auditorium turns 100 this academic year. From Yo-Yo Ma and Joshua Bell to Bob Dylan and Ludacris,University of Michigan's Hill Auditorium has hosted some of the most famous names in the music industry since it opened a century ago. The auditorium is an acoustic gem and this academic year it's celebrating its centennial, a 100-year milestone of countless concerts, graduations and famous keynotes.

 

Concordia University Ann Arbor eyes expansion: More academic programs and maybe a football stadium

By Janet Miller

Concordia University Ann Arbor is marking its 50th academic year this fall with a fresh face and a new direction. The private Christian university on the banks of the Huron River is in the process of being merged with its much larger sister institution, Concordia University Wisconsin, an 8,000-student school located in Mequon, 17 miles north of Milwaukee.

 

University of Michigan to study eating and body issues that are 'huge problem' on college campuses

By Kellie Woodhouse

 One trim, attractive student looked to another and cautioned: "You can't eat that today." "Oh, didn't you already have [enough food]?" she continued. This was a conversation University of Michigan senior Lauren Beriont, an environmental science major, recalls witnessing when she lunched with a group fellow U-M students earlier in her college pilgrimage.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

50 Years After Integration, Ole Miss Grapples With History

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

OXFORD, Miss. — There still may be a few bullet holes in the stately white columns of the Lyceum, the Greek Revival building here that symbolizes the University of Mississippi, but most were unintentionally plastered over during a renovation years ago.

 

Follow a Career Passion? Let It Follow You

By CAL NEWPORT

IN the spring of 2004, during my senior year of college, I faced a hard decision about my future career. I had a job offer from Microsoft and an acceptance letter from the computer science doctoral program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I had also just handed in the manuscript for my first nonfiction book, which opened the option of becoming a full-time writer. These are three strikingly different career paths, and I had to choose which one was right for me.

 

Education Department Report Shows More Borrowers Defaulting on Student Loans

By TAMAR LEWIN

The percentage of borrowers who defaulted on federal education loans within the first three years of payments rose to an average of 13.4 percent last year — 22.7 percent for those who attended for-profit colleges — according to statistics released on Friday by the Department of Education.

Related story:

> WASHINGTON POST: Concerns raised about student loan defaults

 

Friday, September 28, 2012

 

MLIVE

Bigger housing bills might be coming for Ferris State University students next year

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University students could face a bigger housing bill next fall. The university’s board of trustees gave preliminary approval to a proposed 1.9 percent rate increase on room and board rates for the 2013-14 school year, bringing the cost for living on campus for two semesters to about $8,910.

 

GRCC to unveil state-of-the-art addition to culinary program

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - Grand Rapids Community College today will unveil a renovated 54-seat amphitheater-style lecture hall for its culinary program. “It’s literally a dream come true for our faculty,” said Andy Bowne, GRCC’s associate vice president for college advancement. “It will be one more addition to the gem of a program that we have at the Secchia Institute for Culinary Education.”

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

WSU faculty contract talks head to mediator today

By David Jesse

Talks between Wayne State University and its faculty union will head to an outside mediator this morning in hopes of getting a new contract before an extension of the old one runs out Sunday. The bargaining session is set for 9:30 a.m. before a mediator from the state, union officials said.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland Community College to receive funds for training programs

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland Community College will receive federal funding to boost its manufacturing training programs, officials announced Thursday. The $760,000 federal grant will be received over a three-year period and is part of $500 million in funding awarded to community colleges and universities across the nation.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

102-year-old plans to finish University of Michigan degree after dropping out during Great Depression

By Kellie Woodhouse

She's lived through both World Wars, the advent of television and the Internet and the governing of 17 U.S. presidents. Now 102-year-old Margaret Dunning plans to head back to the University of Michigan's Stephen M. Ross School of Business to finish her undergraduate degree.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Enrollment Drops Again in Graduate Programs

By CATHERINE RAMPELL

Enrollment in college is still climbing, but students are increasingly saying no to graduate school in the United States. New enrollment in graduate schools fell last year for the second consecutive year, according to a report from the Council of Graduate Schools.

 

Mixed Returns for Endowments

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

An uneven economic year yielded uneven results for the largest university endowments, with reports released through Thursday revealing a range of results, from a fractional loss on investments for Harvard to a healthy gain for M.I.T.

 

State Is Trying to Put Brakes on High Cost of University

By REEVE HAMILTON

Ashton Curlee, the ambitious daughter of two teachers, received official notification of her acceptance to the new Texas Science Scholar Program at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin on the first day of college.

 

Petraeus Eyes Presidency of Princeton, Article Says

By SCOTT SHANE

WASHINGTON — Might David H. Petraeus, the most prominent military leader of his generation, leave his job as director of the Central Intelligence Agency to become the president of Princeton University?

 

USA TODAY

Editorial: Concealed carry vs. colleges

In May, when University of Colorado students left Boulder for summer break, their campus was gun-free. Last month, they returned to a campus where just about anyone can carry a gun just about anywhere.This misguided change wasn't the university's idea. For 136 years, dating to the days of the Wild West, Colorado's flagship university had kept guns off campus. Then, in 2008, two students and a national group called Students for Concealed Carry challenged the ban, and they eventually prevailed in the state's highest court. That made Colorado one of five states — Mississippi, Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin are the others — where public colleges can no longer ban guns on campus. (Wisconsin can still ban them inside buildings.)

 

Thursday, September 27, 2012

 

MLIVE

Michigan State gets $45 million from MasterCard scholarship program for financially disadvantaged youth

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Michigan State University is partnering with the Mastercard Foundation in its $500 million education initiative, the MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program, to provide financially disadvantaged youth -- particularly those from Africa -- with access to high-quality education.

 

Solar panels to fill new roof of Sangren Hall at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University received a green light from the state to install a solar photovoltaic system on the roof of the new Sangren Hall. Pete Strazdas, WMU associate vice president of facilities management, says it could be the “largest solar system array in the Midwest.”

 

Education: The more the better? What is the value of a college degree, rigorous curriculum?

By John Austin

There is an important debate going on in Michigan and the nation about the purpose of education and the value of college degrees. Time Magazine's May cover story "Is College Worth It?” questioned the economic payoff from an increasingly costly college education.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

New program brings students from Africa to Michigan State University

By David Jesse

As Barbara Kotei sat in Johannesburg, South Africa, pondering where she wanted to go to college, she ran into an admission counselor from Michigan State University. She was intrigued by the school, but the 20-year-old native of Ghana faced a major hurdle in coming to East Lansing: finances.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Michigan State getting $45M for youth effort

 

DETROIT NEWS

The Mary Sue difference -- President strives to sustain academic excellence and affordability at U-M

By Joseph Lichterman

University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman sat and waited. On this morning, several years ago, she was in Los Angeles, scheduled to meet a wealthy individual for breakfast to discuss a potential donation to the university. Nearly an hour passed, and the donor still hadn't arrived, but Coleman didn't leave.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Getting grades via video: U-M instructors and students say screencasts provide interactive feedback

By Kellie Woodhouse

Imagine a scenario where the red-inked margins of college essays are replaced by a succinct video analysis, a cosmos where the grade isn't circled on the final page of the paper, but is slyly tucked into the audible comments of your professor. Receiving back a graded paper is a near-universal experience among the college savvy. Students usually grab their returned essay at the end of class, tear through the pages in search of the final grade and are either instantly inflated or deflated by the result, often ignoring comments penned in the margins.

 

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Report: Public research universities in peril

By Justin Pope, Associated Press

They're the pride and backbone of American higher education, doing essential research and educating en masse the next generations of scientists and engineers. But a new report argues the mission of the country's 101 major public research universities is imperiled by budget cuts amounting to one-fifth of their state funding over the past decade.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Eastern Michigan University signs 2 new partnership agreements with Korean university

By Katrease Stafford

Two newly signed overseas partnership agreements will allow Eastern Michigan University to expand its educational reach to Korea. Officials from EMU's College of Education and Korea National University of Education signed the agreements Aug. 16 during a visit by Korean educators to EMU.

 

Washtenaw Community College receives $2.9M federal grant for IT professional job training program

By Ryan J. Stanton

Washtenaw Community College has received $2.9 million in federal grant funding to support new high-tech job training opportunities for workers whose jobs were outsourced. U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Carl Levin, both Democrats from Michigan, joined in announcing the grant for WCC, along with another $15 million grant for Henry Ford Community College.

 

MLIVE

More Hispanic students earning 4-year degrees, study shows

By Sandra Chang

GRAND RAPIDS, MI-- The Pew Hispanic Center recently released a study showing more Hispanic youth are obtaining bachelor’s degrees in the United States -- and colleges in West Michigan are seeing similar trends.  From 2008 to 2012 the number of Hispanic students at Calvin nearly doubled from 62 to 119, said Matt Kucinski, media relations manager at Calvin College.

 

Saturday-Monday, September 22-24, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M course teaches students where their cash goes

By David Jesse

The 50 students gathered in a basement auditorium on the University of Michigan campus on a cool September evening have at least 13,000 or so reasons to pay real close attention to this class. The course -- UC 270 -- focuses on how U-M's budget, including the $13,000 or more each student pays annually to attend classes, is being spent.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Henry Ford College gets $15M job training grant

By Associated Press

Dearborn — Henry Ford Community College in Dearborn has been awarded a $15 million federal grant to lead a project designed to create high-tech jobs in manufacturing. The U.S. Department of Labor grant will fund a multi-state job training partnership with other community colleges and businesses

 

Ohio State head spends $7.7M to travel, entertain

By Associated Press

Columbus -- A newspaper investigation finds that Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee (ghee) has spent $7.7 million on top of his record-setting compensation to travel, entertain, and maintain his 9,600-square-foot mansion. The Dayton Daily News review published Sunday (http://bit.ly/Qv5I6m) detailed spending by the 68-year-old Gee that comes on top of $8.6 million in salary and benefits he's collected since returning to Columbus to lead the university in October 2007.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University could begin talks of on-campus housing expansion

By KEVIN GRAHAM

Oakland University’s Board of Trustees is expected to be asked at its next meeting to consider a proposal to expand the number of on-campus housing for the university’s 19,300 students. Two weeks after the start of the 2012 fall semester, OU still has a few students living at an off-campus hotel due to overcrowding. The university is paying for the costs of off-campus housing for students, said James Zentmeyer, university housing director.

 

Colleges and universities are filled with academic dishonesty

Many of the nation’s colleges and universities have become cesspools of indoctrination, intolerance, academic dishonesty and an “enlightened” form of racism. This is a decades-old trend. In a 1991 speech, Yale President Benno Schmidt warned: “The most serious problems of freedom of expression in our society today exist on our campuses. The assumption seems to be that the purpose of education is to induce correct opinion rather than to search for wisdom and to liberate the mind.”

 

MLIVE

Declining enrollment continues at Jackson Community College this fall

By Leanne Smith

SUMMIT TWP., MI – Approximately 11 percent fewer students are taking classes at Jackson Community College this fall compared to a year ago, according to enrollment figures released last week. JCC’s enrollment snapshot for the first 10 days of classes this fall shows that 6,247 students are taking classes compared to 7,056 for the first 10 days of classes in fall 2011.

 

Western Michigan University President John Dunn turns focus to hands-on learning and experience

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Being a visionary university was the theme of Western Michigan University President John Dunn's State of the University address on Friday.He noted that 30 years ago, before the dawn of the internet age, WMU President John Bernhard required all students to become computer literate in order to earn a degree from WMU.

 

WMU School of Medicine renovation plans begin taking form; WMU seeks state dollars for improvements

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University is preparing to begin renovations for its future School of Medicine. The WMU Board of Trustees unanimously approved entering into a lease rental prepayment agreement with WMU School of Medicine (WMed) and approved asking the state for capital outlay dollars for the renovation of two floors of the future medical school at a meeting on Thursday.

 

WMU board approves differential tuition for engineering students; expected to generate $2.6 million

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University undergraduate engineering students will pay $40 more for every credit hour taken next spring. The WMU Board of Trustees unanimously approved implementing differential tuition for students in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at its meeting on Thursday.

 

Hundreds of thousands flock to free University of Michigan classes offered on web-based Coursera platform

By Kellie Woodhouse

Engineering and computer science professor J. Alex Halderman teaches one of the largest lectures offered by the University of Michigan. There are well over 500 students enrolled, and they don't all sit in a cavernous lecture hall. Instead, 15,000 students log on to a Web-based platform to participate in Handerman's "Securing Digital Democracy" class.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Eastern Michigan University eyes Buckeye territory for prospective students

By Kellie Woodhouse

Eastern Michigan University is working to attract more students from Ohio— and it's succeeding. Nearly 12 percent of EMU's incoming freshmen are from Ohio. Since 2010, the school has more than doubled the number of first-time freshmen enrolling from Ohio.

 

Eastern Michigan University signs reverse transfer agreement with Washtenaw Community College

By Katrease Stafford

Eastern Michigan University and Washtenaw Community College signed a reverse transfer agreement Friday to enable students to obtain their associate degree through credits accumulated at the university. The agreement will apply to students within 15 credits of graduation at WCC when they transferred. The university will send out emails to these students asking if they want their EMU transcript sent back to WCC free of charge to be used toward completing their associate degree.

 

U-M dean speaks about teacher evaluations Sunday on MSNBC's 'Teacher Town Hall'

Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the University of Michigan's School of Education, will be interviewed at noon Sunday on MSNBC as part of the NBC network’s Education Nation Summit. According to the University Record, Ball will be interviewed by NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams about the changing landscape of teacher evaluation, as part of a two-hour “Teacher Town Hall.”

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

California's community colleges staggering during hard times

By Carla Rivera

Marianet Tirado returned to Los Angeles Trade Tech community college this fall, optimistic that she would get into the classes she needs to transfer to a four-year university. Of the courses she wanted, only two had space left when she registered in May. She enrolled in those and "crashed" others. In one of those cases, she lucked out when the professor teaching a political science class admitted additional students. But she couldn't get into a biology class because she was too far down on the waiting list.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

University Is Uneasy as Court Ruling Allows Guns on Campus

By DAN FROSCH

BOULDER, Colo. — During her 19 years teaching English at the University of Colorado Boulder, Karen Jacobs never gave much thought to whether one of her students was carrying a gun. As the state’s flagship university, it had a longstanding firearms ban. So even in a place like Colorado, where gun rights are nearly as deeply cherished as John Elway and fresh snow, there was never a need for concern.

 

Princeton President Announces She Will Step Down

By ARIEL KAMINER

The president of Princeton University, Shirley M. Tilghman, announced on Saturday that she would step down in June. Dr. Tilghman, a molecular biologist and a professor, became the second woman to lead an Ivy League institution when she emerged as the surprise choice to head the university in 2001.

 

Friday, September 21, 2012

 

MLIVE

WMU board approves differential tuition for engineering students; expected to generate $2.6 million

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University undergraduate engineering students will pay $40 more for every credit hour taken next spring. The WMU Board of Trustees unanimously approved implementing differential tuition for students in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at its meeting on Thursday.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M praises $32.5M gift for art, design school

By David Jesse

The University of Michigan will use a $32.5-million gift to further its art and design education, officials said Thursday. The gift, one of the largest ever in the nation to an arts and design school, was formally accepted by the Board of Regents at its regular meeting Thursday.The gift from alumna Penny Stamps will be matched by $7.5 million from the university -- adding a total of $40 million to the school, which will be renamed the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design. The school will become the fourth college on Michigan's campus to be named after an individual.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Design alum gives U-M $32.5M gift

 

Thursday, September 20, 2012

 

MLIVE

WMU enrollment off 1.9 percent, with more part-time and graduate students and fewer freshmen

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University fall enrollment is down 1.9 percent from last year. There are 24,598 students attending the university this fall, 488 fewer than the 25,086 enrolled last year, according to a report released Wednesday.

 

SVSU named Military Friendly School by Victory Media

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — Saginaw Valley State University is a good place for military service members and veterans. Victory Media selected SVSU for the second straight year for its 2013 Miliary Friendly Schools list. The list honors the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools that embrace U.S. military men and women and their spouses as students.

 

CMU receives approval from Higher Learning Commission to grant doctor of medicine degrees

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan University’s medical school continues to move forward, and now has approval from the Higher Learning Commission. The commission’s approval of the College of Medicine’s degree means CMU can offer and grant doctor of medicine degrees.

 

Lake Michigan College testing new method of connecting low-income students to social services

By Ursula Zerilli

BENTON TOWNSHIP, MI – Lake Michigan College is one of seven colleges across the nation participating in an experimental program to see if coordinated financial help, such as child care subsidies and food assistance, helps low-income students complete a degree. Twenty-eight students, six of whom were without a stable home, have already received benefits in the program’s early stages, according to the college.

 

Culinary institute at Kalamazoo Valley Community College still in planning phase

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College administrators are back at the drawing board stages for creating a culinary institute. Building a $16 million culinary program tops its five-year master plan and has topped the community college's capital outlay request list for state funding for the past two years.

 

GRCC lifts hiring freeze, but administration mum on when vacant positions will be filled

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Rapids Community College has lifted a hiring freeze, but it’s unclear when administrators will begin filling the vacant positions. In a statement, President Steven Ender said he decided to lift the hiring freeze – implemented in June – because enrollment for fall semester was higher than expected. This summer, administrators said the college could face a budget deficit if more students didn’t sign up for classes.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

New University of Michigan course lets students peek behind the scenes of the college budget

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan junior Dominique Harvey likes to track money. She's interested in where it comes from, where it goes and why.And when it's her money — in the form of tuition dollars — she's especially interested. "I am a business major, so I'm always interested people use their resources. ... I am interested in how they operate behind the scenes," Harvey says.

 

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

 

MLIVE

Clear expectations, minimum grade requirements lead to lots of A’s in GVSU's health courses

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Inside Robert Smereka’s radiation therapy class at Grand Valley State University, little is left unknown about what it takes to earn an A. Smereka, an adjunct professor at GVSU’s College of Health Professions, prides himself on being upfront with students about what material they need to master to do well on exams and other assignments.

 

Differential tuition for engineering students on Western Michigan University board meeting agenda

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Tuition could go up for Western Michigan University engineering students as soon as spring pending a decision by the Board of Trustees on Thursday. The meeting takes place at 11 a.m. in Rooms 157-159 of the Bernhard Center.

 

Ferris State University receives second most funding in state for keeping its tuition increase low

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University is getting a bigger slice of state aid for keeping its tuition increase this summer to a minimum. Ferris has received $1.2 million in tuition restraint funding from the state, the second most of Michigan’s 15 public universities, according to a memo by the House Fiscal Agency.

 

5 finance tips for college students from WMU's head of finances and business

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University Vice President of Business and Finance Jan Van Der Kley understands the debt-ridden college student’s plight, because she was once a student herself, paying her way through WMU. It’s not just students who are adjusting to the changing times, Van Der Kley said during an interview with the Kalamazoo Gazette.

 

CMU enrollment declines slightly, follows mid-Michigan trend

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Enrollment at Central Michigan University is down slightly from last year. The Mount Pleasant-based school has total enrollment of 27,693, which is down 2.2 percent. That figure includes off-campus students. About 22,000 students attend classes at the main campus.

 

CMU to receive nearly $1.8 million from state for tuition restraint

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan University had the lowest percentage point tuition increase this year of Michigan's 15 public universities, and the state is rewarding CMU. CMU is to receive nearly $1.8 million for tuition restraint after raising tuition by 1.96 percent. That amounts to a $7 per credit hour increase.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Eastern Michigan University dipped into reserves by $2M last year

By Kellie Woodhouse

Eastern Michigan University dipped into its reserves by $2 million last year to cover a shortfall in enrollment and investment income. The Ypsilanti school originally projected the shortfall to reach $5.6 million, but administrators and colleges trimmed costs —using attrition, reining in travel and supply expenses, and cutting certain initiatives— by $3.6 million, closing the gap but not eliminating it.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M rally pushes in-state tuition for undocumented students

By David Jesse

Several dozen University of Michigan students set up a mock graduation exercise on the steps of the Hatcher Graduate Library on Tuesday afternoon to protest what they say is the university's slowness in deciding whether to change policies to give undocumented students the in-state tuition rate. The Coalition for Tuition Equality wants the university to allow students who are undocumented but graduated from a Michigan high school to receive the in-state tuition rate. Organizers say U-M is discriminating against the students by forcing them to pay the $30,000-plus-per-year out-of-state rate, more than double the in-state rate.

 

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

 

MLIVE

Some WMU super seniors losing Pell Grants; graduate students facing more expensive loans

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University senior Adam Dean worked more than 65 hours a week over the summer because he tapped out of undergraduate financial aid. To make matters worse for Dean, all college seniors who have received 12 semesters -- or more than six years -- of the Federal Pell Grant have been cut off.

 

For students at GVSU’s College of Education, getting an A is the norm

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- At Grand Valley State University’s College of Education, earning an A is far from unusual. In fact, professors often take extra time to make sure that’s what their students receive.

 

GVSU and Michigan State University team up for clinical research program

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- A new online certificate offered by Grand Valley State University aims to train students to work in clinical research, a program the university says will help meet demand in a growing field. The certificate is a partnership between GVSU and Michigan State University, and will give students from both schools the basic skills needed to help develop and oversee clinical research projects, said Jean Nagelkerk, vice provost for health at GVSU.

 

At GVSU, it's not always advanced courses that students struggle with most

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- When it comes to grading at Grand Valley State University, it’s not the most advanced classes on campus that prove the biggest challenge for students. It’s the introductory ones.

 

GVSU course was so hard, professor split it in two

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Math and science have long been a challenge for students at Grand Valley State University, but you won’t find any equations or experiments in what was one of the college’s hardest courses.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Dorm renovation tab to reach $500M as University of Michigan plans $60M renovation of South Quad

By Kellie Woodhouse

The eight-year tally for on-campus housing development at the University of Michigan will reach $500 million next year if the Board of Regents approves a $60 million renovation of its South Quadrangle residence hall. U-M has spent $440 million to renovate eight dormitories and dining halls, including the current $116 million renovation of East Quadrangle, which is taking place this year. A refurbished Alice C. Lloyd Hall opened this year, after a $56 million investment, and has amenities and furnishings that rival the new luxury student high-rises popping up around Ann Arbor.

 

University of Michigan launches bicycle rental program

By Kellie Woodhouse

One of America's most bike-friendly campuses just got a little friendlier. A woman bikes down the sidewalk next to State Street by the University of Michigan Museum of Art in Ann Arbor.

 

WALL STREET JOURNAL

B-School Applicants Decline for Four Years .

By MELISSA KORN

The business-school numbers are in and they aren't pretty. Applications for two-year, full-time M.B.A. programs that start this fall declined for the fourth year in a row, according to new data from the Graduate Management Admission Council, which administers the Graduate Management Admission Test.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Study of anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim bias on UC campuses stirs debate

By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is again extending its reach onto University of California campuses, raising questions about the limits of free speech and how welcome Jewish and Muslim students feel at their schools.

 

Saturday-Monday, September 15-17, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Eastern Michigan University president, bosses at odds

By David Jesse

She has rappelled down the side of a campus building to help promote the ROTC program. She has jumped onto the marching band platform at football games. And she was the public face behind Eastern Michigan University's much heralded zero, zero, zero campaign that froze tuition, rent and fees two years ago.

 

Michigan colleges to be rewarded for lower increases in tuition rate

By David Jesse

Central Michigan University's decision to keep its tuition rate increase for this school year lower than that of other state schools is paying off to the tune of almost $1.8 million in extra state aid from a fund set up to reward universities for smaller hikes.

 

DETROIT NEWS

WSU fights to keep $167M research grant

By Kim Kozlowski

For years Dr. Ivana Vettraino ordered some pregnant women to stay in the hospital and endure weeks in bed to avoid delivering their baby prematurely. But Vettraino and her colleagues recently began telling certain patients to skip the bed rest after groundbreaking prematurity prevention was discovered last year by federal and Wayne State University researchers.

 

MLIVE

Adrian College takes risks, uses business-model strategy to turn dark days into rosy future

By Leanne Smith

ADRIAN, MI – On a sunny September day, the area of campus Adrian College calls “the mall” is alive with students hurrying across manicured lawns toward classes, a modern library or the terraced patio of the student center. The mood is energetic and vibrant, as the college this fall has welcomed its largest-ever incoming class of 650 students and total enrollment of 1,755 students.

 

3 myths about college costs

By Julie Mack

KALAMAZOO, MI — After writing a couple of hefty checks in the past month to support two daughters in college, I'm as willing and able as anyone to offer a rant on college costs. My younger daughter, for instance, was expected to spend $200 this fall for a Spanish textbook and online code to a study guide. Really? Really??

 

Hope College's $3.7 million Haworth Engineering Center expansion starts Monday, projects 2013 opening

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Construction is expected to begin later this month on a 9,000-square-foot engineering center at Hope College, creating more space for a program that has grown significantly since being launched in 1997.

 

Enrollment and academic performance on the rise at Calvin College

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Enrollment grew at Calvin College this fall, but still lags behind the record number of students who attended the private, Christian liberal arts school in the 1980s. The total number of students – who also have higher grade point averages and ACT scores than previous classes – climbed to 4,008, up 1 percent from last year. It’s the first time since fall 2009 that the student body exceeded 4,000 students, the college said.

 

Kalamazoo Public Schools sees drop in number of suspensions, expulsions

By Julie Mack

KALAMAZOO, MI -- The number of suspensions in Kalamazoo Public Schools has dropped by 10.5 percent since 2009-10 and the number of suspensions for African-American students has dropped 16 percent. Meanwhile, the number of expulsions and exclusions have been cut in half since 2007-08, according to a presentation to the KPS board Thursday.

 

Friday, September 14, 2012

 

MLIVE

Kalamazoo College to break ground on new Arcus Center on Oct. 9

By Ursula Zerilli

 KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College will break ground on the new contemporary and earth-friendly building for Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership with a public ceremony on Oct. 9.

 

U-M gets $1.5 million for nursing diversity program

By The Associated Press

The University of Michigan says it's getting a $1.5 million federal grant to continue a program that prepares middle school, high school and college students to become nurses.

 

West Michigan Aviation Academy receives state aeronautics commission's Award of Excellence

By Monica Scott

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - The West Michigan Aviation Academy is this year's recipient of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission's Award of Excellence.

 

U.S. World & News ranks WMU as a top national university; school falls three spots from last year

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University is being ranked as the 189th best in the nation in U.S. News & World Report's annual list of 1,500 four-year institutions.

 

Thursday, September 13, 2012

 

MLIVE

U.S. News & World Report ranks Michigan State in top 25% of major institutions

By Brandon Howell

Michigan State University is ranked No. 72 of 281 national universities in the latest edition of U.S. News & World Report's America's Best Colleges. The ranking places MSU in the top 25 percent of all major institutions. MSU is also ranked 28th on the list of top public universities.

Related story:

> ANNARBOR.COM: University of Michigan named among top public colleges in U.S. News, QS rankings

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan offers alternatives to bottled water but won't consider outright ban

By Kellie Woodhouse

Bottled water is losing its welcome at the University of Michigan. While administrators say they won't comply with the student government's now year-old request that the school ban the sale of bottled water on campus, 42 water bottle refill stations have been installed at U-M and 74 refill attachments have been outfitted on existing water fountains.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

U-M praised for taking lead as smoke-free campus

By David Jesse

As University of Michigan junior Marissa Wilson waited at the stoplight to cross State Street in Ann Arbor on Wednesday afternoon, she took a few last puffs on her cigarette. As soon as Wilson, 21, of Grand Rapids started heading across the Diag on U-M property, she was entering a smoke-free zone.

 

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University President John Dunn to give university address on Sept. 21

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University President John Dunn will give his State of the University address at 2 p.m. on Sept. 21 in the Dalton Center Recital Hall. The yearly address will take place during the university’s academic convocation, which is an annual university event that celebrates the accomplishments of the institution.

 

Hope College enrollment hits record high

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- For the second year in a row, a record number of students are enrolled at Hope College. Approximately 3,343 students are taking classes at Hope this fall, up 2.8 percent from last year’s record high of 3,249, the college said.

 

Public universities eye out-of-state students for budget help

By Ted Roelofs | Bridge Magazine

Faced with tight budgets and prospective dwindleng in-state enrollment, public universities across Michigan are looking beyond the state line for answers. One option, say advocates such as Domino's Pizza CEO Patrick Doyle and University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, is to boost recruitment of out-of-state students – students who pay much higher tuition rates than the Michigan natives sitting next to them in class.

 

WASHINGTON POST

U.S. News college rankings get new scrutiny

By Nick Anderson

How much suspense can there be in a ranking that lists Harvard and Princeton as the best national universities, followed by Yale? Yet the U.S. News & World Report annual college rankings, released Wednesday, are closely scrutinized in higher education. College presidents often denounce the rankings as trivial but pay enormous attention to them because the rankings are seen as the top arbiter of prestige in a vast, costly and unruly marketplace.

 

Tuesday, September 12, 2012

 

MLIVE

With average student debt at $33,674, Ferris State University looks to address cost and reduce borrowing

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University has created a task force to brainstorm ways to reduce student debt. The 10-member task force, which consists of faculty and administrators, is aiming to address debt by recommending short-term changes in three-areas: cost, graduation rates and financial literacy.

 

GRCC faculty association still negotiating on salary schedules, evaluations

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A tentative faculty contract at Grand Rapids Community College is expected to be ratified before the end of the year, but two significant issues need clarification before that happens, the head of the college’s faculty association said.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Jury trial next month in suit over ex-EMU student dismissed after declining to counsel gay client

By David Jesse

A nationally-watched lawsuit pitting religious freedom versus discrimination against gay people is back on the front burner, with a jury trial scheduled for next month in federal court in Detroit. Former student Julea Ward is suing Eastern Michigan University, claiming EMU dismissed her from its counseling program because of her religious beliefs after she declined to counsel a gay client. Ward said she offered the client a referral to a different counselor.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Commentary: Guns don't belong on campus

By Bill Maxwell

On two occasions during my career as a college professor, I feared for my safety when students confronted me about their final grades. Because of the gun violence on our campuses and in other public spaces today, I think more and more about those confrontations.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Lawrence Tech named ‘best in Midwest’

Lawrence Technological University has earned the Best in the Midwest designation for the fourth year in a row from The Princeton Review, based on academic excellence and a student survey. Lawrence Tech, in Southfield, was among the 153 colleges selected in the 12-state Midwest Region and 633 colleges selected overall, representing 25 percent of the nation’s 2,500 four-year colleges.

 

Saturday-Monday, September 8-10, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

EMU band revives Hurons logo that school dropped 20 years ago

By Christina Hall

Eastern Michigan University's old Hurons logo is making a reappearance more than 20 years after it was dropped over concerns that it was offensive to American Indians and others. The Hurons logo, used from 1929 to 1991, and a block M logo that honors the Normalites -- when the university was known as Michigan State Normal School -- are embroidered inside new band uniforms that will be worn at today's football home opener.

The logos are inside the green and white jackets near the wearer's heart and aren't visible on the outside.

 

MLIVE

A college professor's advice to freshmen

By Julie Mack

KALAMAZOO, MI --  When her 18-year-old nephew started college this fall, Michelle Miller-Adams decided the best gift was some advice on how he could make the most of the next four years.

 

WMU President John Dunn says university's teacher education program will be among nation's best

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University President John Dunn wants the university’s education program, which was recently downgraded to an “at-risk” status by the state, to be among the best in three years. “I’m not trying to ignore we have work to do; let's do it,” said Dunn during an interview at WMUK 102.1 FM on Wednesday that included the Kalamazoo Gazette/MLive. “All hands are on board; this is an opportunity to think different and to challenge ourselves."

 

Bronco Bash attracts thousands of Western Michigan University students

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University sophomore Jim Swintek remembers roaming hundreds of Bronco Bash tents two years ago because that’s how he was introduced to the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. This year Swintek and his brothers ran their own booth to introduce themselves to new students.

 

Michigan State's enrollment sets new record, bolstered by largest-ever freshman class

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- Another year, another record enrollment for Michigan State University. The university expects to have 48,800 matriculates in the 2012-2013 academic year, according to preliminary data presented to the Board of Trustees at is meeting Friday morning. That would break the record MSU set last fall by about 850 students.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Debt Collectors Cashing In on Student Loans

By ANDREW MARTIN

At a protest last year at New York University, students called attention to their mounting debt by wearing T-shirts with the amount they owed scribbled across the front — $90,000, $75,000, $20,000. On the sidelines was a business consultant for the debt collection industry with a different take.

 

USA TODAY

Analysis: U.S. colleges have made huge endowment gains

By Jodi Upton and Christopher Schnaars

Led by big investment gains in 2011, U.S. colleges have built investment behemoths and rainy day funds of more than $408 billion, and most have recouped recession losses, according to a USA TODAY analysis. But parents and students are unlikely to see much of a break in tuition.

Related story:

> USA TODAY: Endowments fund dorms, salaries — and sometimes tuition

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Record incoming class for MSU squeezes hundreds of students into transitional housing

By Matthew Miller

EAST LANSING — The sole patch of open space in the room shared by Keegan Cook, Eric Cutajar and Jake Stricker is a narrow shoe-strewn rectangle, not much larger than the bunk next to it.

The rest of the room in Michigan State University’s Emmons Hall is a clutter of furniture, clothes and assorted sports equipment. There is just one closet, and it’s filled to the top.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Schools find new ways to welcome community college transfers

By Larry Gordon

The 200 transfer students ate Huli Huli chicken and wore plastic leis at a recent luau held in their honor at USC. But more important than food or party favors, participants said, was the camaraderie and encouragement to join the campus mainstream.

 

Friday, September 7, 2012

 

MLIVE

Grand Valley State University's freshmen class surpasses 4,000 students for first time

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Grand Valley State University’s freshmen class surpassed 4,000 students this fall, making it the largest group of incoming students in the university’s history. The freshmen class totals 4,005 students, up 2 percent from last year’s incoming class, according to GVSU. The total number of students enrolled at the university this fall is 24,654, down slightly from last year.

 

Democratic platform on higher education: Universities would lose federal aid if tuition soars

By Dave Murray

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Colleges that don’t keep tuition down could see less federal aid, according to the Democratic Party’s platform on higher education. President Barack Obama plans to deliver his acceptance speech in North Carolina tonight. It’s unknown whether he’ll address higher education; but the president has made speeches here in Michigan addressing college costs.

 

Kalamazoo Valley Community College delays manufacturing academy opening; needs more students

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo Valley Community College is postponing the start date and renaming its newest Mechatronics Academy, which was originally slated to open in August. The 18-week program aims to prepare students for careers in automated industrial equipment maintenance and repair. Once certified, students will be able to perform troubleshooting, service, and repair on automated industrial systems.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Editorial: U-M regents should put fight on hold

For more than a year, the Democratic majority on the board of regents at the University of Michigan has supported the unionization of the university's 2,000 graduate student research assistants. And regents haven't just given their time — they've also committed the university to paying hundreds of thousands in legal fees to support their pro-union efforts. That's an outrageous waste of university — and taxpayer — funds.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

EMU spokesman: 'Icebreaker' parties have nothing to do with university

By Kyle Feldscher Crime and courts reporter

Eastern Michigan University issued a statement Thursday afternoon denouncing all off-campus “Icebreaker” events as organizers geared up for one such party at Spirits Restaurant and Lounge in Van Buren Township. EMU spokesman Geoff Larcom said Thursday any off-campus party using the Eastern Michigan University name was not an official university event. He said the use of the EMU name was inappropriate and illegal.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Colorado State to Offer Credits for Online Class

By TAMAR LEWIN

As millions of students have flocked to free “massive open online courses," or MOOCs, in recent months, higher education experts have focused on two big questions: whether universities will begin to offer credit for such courses, and what might be done to prevent cheating.

 

A New Way to Tackle College Algebra

By REEVE HAMILTON

Alexzandria Siprian, a senior at the University of Texas at Arlington who is double-majoring in Spanish and theater, is not a math person. Early in her college career, she squeaked through her required algebra course with a D.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Ann Romney, Michelle Obama and broke 20-somethings

By Jenna Johnson

When Ann Romney took the stage at the Republican National Convention in Tampa last week, she spoke warmly of marrying while still in college and surviving on just a little money in a basement apartment. “Those were very special days,” she said.

 

Thursday, September 6, 2012

 

MLIVE

Report: CMU freshmen required to take alcohol education course

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Alcohol education is now part of a Central Michigan University freshman student's experience. About 3,000 incoming students at the university must take a two-phase online course to decrease alcohol poisoning and excessive drinking, Central Michigan Life reported. Each phase takes about two hours, and students must take the course to register for spring classes.

 

Older Western Michigan University students, 26 and up, looking forward to new semester

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Most college students can spot a wide-eyed freshmen roaming campus on the first day of classes, but there are increasingly more grown adults wearing that same expression wandering around Western Michigan University. “I’ve been bored all summer,” said Joey Maher, a 35-year-old undergraduate student, after attending her first WMU class on Tuesday. “I’m ready to get done and start my career.”

 

Kalamazoo College welcomes 340 first-year students to campus; classes begin Sept. 10

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College faculty, wearing flowing academic gowns, welcomed 340 first-year students to the college in a formal ceremony Wednesday. After moving into their dorms in the morning, the students were officially inducted into the college during an afternoon ceremony in Stetson Chapel, marking the beginning of their first-year college experience. They bid their parents farewell after the event.

 

GVSU taps into food truck trend, caters to changing student tastes

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Students looking to grab a quick bite to eat between classes at Grand Valley State University can now get their food on-the-go. College dining leaders, looking to capitalize on a national food truck trend, have renovated a former concession trailer to become a semi-mobile dining option, parking it across from Zumberge Library.

 

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

 

MLIVE

Freshmen enrollment at Ferris State University down slightly; overall student body at Big Rapids campus growing

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Ferris State University’s freshmen class shrunk slightly this fall. But the total student body at the university's Big Rapids campus is nearing a historic high, thanks to efforts aimed at keeping students from dropping out.

 

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

In decade of challenges and triumphs, Mary Sue Coleman transforms University of Michigan

By David Jesse

Standing behind a podium, dressed in her formal academic gown, University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman broke into a smile last week as her speech in front of entering freshmen deviated a bit from a stock welcome-to-campus-you're-going-to-do-great-things pep talk. She told the students to drop by her house. "Yes, I really do live there, no matter what you've heard," she said to laughter. "Please come by (to an open house)."

Related story:

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: University of Michigan and Mary Sue Coleman already planning for successor

 

PORT HURON TIMES HERALD

Michael McCartan: Transition to college can be uncertain for young adults

The transition from high school to college is one of the most pivotal points in a person’s life. It can be an exciting and liberating experience. Often, though, the fear of the unknown and extreme cultural change can put students into emotional and mental shock.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan to break ground this fall on $29M expansion of Institute for Social Research

By Ryan J. Stanton

The University of Michigan is planning to break ground this fall on construction of a $29 million addition to the Division Street side of its Institute for Social Research building. The project website, last updated on Aug. 13, describes it as a five-level, 56,700-square-foot addition (four levels above grade). Construction is expected to last through early 2014. The university mailed notices to neighbors this past week, inviting them to a meeting where construction logistics, schedule and other information about the project will be shared.

 

Aliens, witchcraft and zombie philosophers: 8 unconventional courses at University of Michigan

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan sparked a national debate nine years ago when the school offered a course titled "How to be Gay." Last year, Michigan State University raised eyebrows when it offered a course called "Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse."

 

SLATE

Training the Liars and Cheaters of Tomorrow --- The way we teach ethics to business school students isn’t working. We need a new way.

By Ray Fisman and Adam Galinsky

A few years ago, Israeli game theorist Ariel Rubinstein got the idea of examining how the tools of economic science affected the judgment and empathy of his undergraduate students at Tel Aviv University. He made each student the CEO of a struggling hypothetical company, and tasked them with deciding how many employees to lay off. Some students were given an algebraic equation that expressed profits as a function of the number of employees on the payroll. Others werSe given a table listing the number of employees in one column and corresponding profits in the other. Simply presenting the layoff/profits data in a different format had a surprisingly strong effect on students’ choices—fewer than half of the “table” students chose to fire as many workers as was necessary to maximize profits, whereas three quarters of the “equation” students chose the profit-maximizing level of pink slips. Why? The “equation” group simply “solved” the company’s problem of profit maximization, without thinking about the consequences for the employees they were firing.

 

Monday, September 3, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Professor pushes for better e-textbooks -- Many students still prefer traditional product so educator worked to develop better option

By Steve Rosen

Predictions that electronic textbooks would push traditional books to the back shelf on college campuses have so far proven overly optimistic. But Brian Lindshield remains a big believer. The assistant professor of human nutrition at Kansas State University has developed an online teaching product that relies on so-called flexbook technology. That's "flex" as in flexibility.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University students to be housed in Auburn Hills hotel rooms

By KEVIN GRAHAM

A year after Oakland University’s dormitories were overbooked by 100 students, OU is again staring at a problem of resident overpopulation. Housing Director James Zentmeyer said OU has booked 75 rooms at the Homestead Studio Suites on University Drive in Auburn Hills. If the number of students requesting housing holds, this will be just enough to keep up with demand, and overflow students will be placed in the hotel.

 

Wayne State, OCC team up to give students options to earn degrees

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland Community College students will be able to earn two-year associate’s degrees at OCC even if they transfer to the four-year Wayne State University before they complete the requirements. The same so-called reverse transfer agreement between the two institutions was also reached between Wayne State and the Macomb and Henry Ford community colleges, said Thomas Reynolds, spokesman for WSU.

 

Sunday, September 2, 2012

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Muslims From Abroad Are Thriving in Catholic Colleges

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

DAYTON, Ohio — Arriving from Kuwait to attend college here, Mai Alhamad wondered how Americans would receive a Muslim, especially one whose head scarf broadcasts her religious identity. At any of the countless secular universities she might have chosen, religion — at least in theory — would be beside the point. But she picked one that would seem to underline her status as a member of a religious minority. She enrolled at the University of Dayton, a Roman Catholic school, and she says it suits her well.

 

Reflecting on Ambitious Education Plan

By REEVE HAMILTON

At a tense meeting of the University of Texas System Board of Regents on Aug. 25, 2011, after several months in which the board was at the center of a tug of war between groups with differing approaches to higher-education reform, Chancellor Francisco G. Cigarroa unveiled his Framework for Advancing Excellence.

 

Harvard Students in Cheating Scandal Say Collaboration Was Accepted

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Harvard students suspected in a major cheating scandal said on Friday that many of the accusations are based on innocent — or at least tolerated — collaboration among students, and with help from graduate-student teachers who sometimes gave them answers to test questions.

Related story:

> CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: Cheating at Harvard: probe focuses on plagiarism in era of blurry ethics

 

Saturday, September 1, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Sleep key to higher GPAs, colleges realize

By Justin Pope, Associated Press

As college students return to campus in the coming weeks, they'll be showered in the usual handouts of coupons, condoms and credit cards. But some schools are also giving students what a growing body of research reveals could make a huge difference in their college careers: ear plugs, sleep shades and napping lessons. College health officials are finally realizing that healthy sleep habits are a potential miracle drug for much of what ails the famously frazzled modern American college student: anxiety, depression, physical health problems and — more than most students realize — academic troubles. Some studies have found students getting adequate sleep average a full letter grade higher than those who don't.

 

MLIVE

Report: Online tool lets students compare college textbook prices

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Shopping for textbooks just got a bit easier for some college students. A new online tool, created by a Sacramento-based group that advocates for affordable textbooks, allows users to quickly see how the price of renting or buying books differs at various retailers.

 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

City Colleges, teachers union reach tentative deal

By Dawn Rhodes

City Colleges of Chicago and its full-time faculty union agreed to the terms of a new five-year contract Saturday, one that officials said rewards teachers for their efforts as well as prioritizes student success.

 

Friday, August 31, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Oakland University, faculty union reach tentative agreement

By Tammy Stables Battaglia

Oakland University's administration and faculty union hammered out a proposed contract agreement, with details announced after consideration by union officials. The two sides reached a tentative agreement at 3:30 a.m. today, according to the American Association of University Professors Oakland University Chapter website. The details will be announced after the contract is presented to the AAUP Executive Committee, according to the union.

Related stories:

> DETROIT NEWS: Tentative agreement for Oakland University, faculty includes pay raises

> OAKLAND PRESS: Oakland University professors reach 3-year deal

 

Community service day helps Calvin College students get out of their 'comfort zone'

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Inside the Cook Library Center on Grand Rapids’ southwest side Thursday afternoon, Elizabeth Austin followed along as 10-year-old Estelita Chajal handily made her way through several children’s books.

 

GOP higher education platform says colleges should not be used for 'political indoctrination'

By Dave Murray

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Public universities should not be used for “political indoctrination” or become “zones of intellectual intolerance favoring the left,” according to the Republican Party’s campaign platform. While K-12 schools have not been a high-profile issue in the presidential campaign, President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney have spent even less time debating higher education.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Harvard Says 125 Students May Have Cheated on a Final Exam

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA and JESS BIDGOOD

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Harvard University revealed Thursday what could be its largest cheating scandal in memory, saying that about 125 students might have worked in groups on a take-home final exam despite being explicitly required to work alone. The accusations, related to a single undergraduate class in the spring semester, deal with “academic dishonesty, ranging from inappropriate collaboration to outright plagiarism,” the administration said in a note sent to students.

Related story:

> USA TODAY: 125 Harvard students suspected of cheating on take-home exam

 

Saying It’s Time to Move On, Yale President Will Retire

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

Richard C. Levin, who has directed a vast expansion and modernization of Yale University while improving university finances and relations with the city of New Haven, announced on Thursday that he would retire as president at the end of the school year, after 20 years. Dr. Levin is currently the most senior president in the Ivy League and one of the longest-serving in Yale’s history. The university is expected to undertake a nationwide search for a successor, who will take the helm next summer at an elite institution with a global reputation and a $3 billion annual operating budget.

 

New Hope for Turnaround at Troubled Service Academy

By ARIEL KAMINER

Placing his hand on a Bible, wearing the gold shoulder boards that had been pinned on him moments before, Rear Adm. James A. Helis looked out at several hundred uniformed students last month and took the oath of office as the new leader of the United States Merchant Marine Academy. He was the fourth person to do so in the last four years.

 

Thursday, August 30, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Oakland University faculty union optimistic new contract expected soon

By David Jesse

Oakland University's faculty union is expressing optimism that a new labor contract will soon be worked out. Writing on the union's website, faculty negotiators said bargaining on Tuesday between the union and the administration went well, with the next round of talks scheduled today.

 

MLIVE

Kalamazoo College ranked highest among Michigan liberal arts colleges in Washington Monthly rankings

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Washington Monthly is including Kalamazoo College on its list of top liberal arts colleges in the country.  K-College ranked the highest among the private liberal arts colleges in the state, at No. 24 in the list of 254 colleges across the country.

 

Living in close quarters: campus housing crunch at Cornerstone packs five students into some rooms

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Standing inside her dorm room at Cornerstone University Wednesday, Abbigail Stefanek watched as her father brainstormed ways to pull off what seemed like a tricky task: fitting five beds into a room normally used for two.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Some U-M freshmen luck out with renovated dorms: 'This is what $56 million looks like'

By Kellie Woodhouse

Three years ago, then-freshman Anna Peters avoided the bathroom of her University of Michigan dormitory as much as possible. "I would actually dread going to the bathroom it was so disgusting," the now-senior said of her residence hall, Alice Lloyd Hall. "And everything was dirty. The mattresses were old."

 

For University of Michigan freshmen, a mix of excitement and nerves ushers in the next four years

By KELLIE WOODHOUSE

For Drew Maron, home is a long ways away. The Atlanta, Ga., native is excited, and a little bit nervous, about his first year at the University of Michigan. "It is a kind of strange responsibility living on your own at first, everything that has ever been taken care of for you is kind of on you now," he said. "It’s a little nerve-racking, but at the same time it's also liberating, the independence."

 

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Wayne State University welcomes its first-year students

By David Jesse

Taz Ahmed stood in front of several thousand new students and their parents at Wayne State University on Tuesday morning and congratulated them on a milestone -- starting their college career before noon. Ahmed, the president of WSU's Student Senate, was among several speakers who formally welcomed incoming students to the Midtown Detroit campus.

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University ranks ahead of Brown University in Washington Monthly's top 100 college rankings

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University is being called one of the top 100 universities in the nation by Washington Monthly. WMU was one of five Michigan universities included on the list and ranked No. 90 in the U.S. Washington Monthly claims their rankings are different from others for being based on what colleges and universities are doing to serve their students and country.

Related stories:

> MLIVE: Best bang for the buck? Five Michigan colleges rank in top 100, according to Washington Monthly

> ANNARBOR.COM: U-M No. 13 on list of nation's top 100 colleges

 

Rockford High seniors able to earn college credit in Ferris State University career exploration course

By Monica Scott

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Rockford schools is partnering with Ferris State University this school year to offer its seniors an opportunity to make progress toward a degree while exploring career options in the new CARE 102 course. “This is an opportunity to make sure more students are successful in higher education,” said Rockford Superintendent Michael Shibler. “This class will help students figure out their career path or learn more about a career of interest.”

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan welcoming thousands of students back to campus for another school year

By Kellie Woodhouse

Roughly 9,000 students will pour into Ann Arbor over the next three days, bringing a buzz of activity to the University of Michigan's campus after more than three months of relative quiet. Already about 700 students have moved into the dormitories. Most of those students are volunteers assigned to help the move-in process go smoothly.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Survey offers dire picture of California's two-year colleges

By Carla Rivera

More than 470,000 community college students are beginning the fall semester on waiting lists, unable to get into the courses they need, according to a survey of California's two-year colleges that captures a system struggling amid severe budget cuts. The survey, to be released Wednesday, quantified the myriad problems affecting the system, many of which have been anecdotally reported by students on many campuses. The colleges expect steep declines in enrollment and class offerings compared with last fall.

 

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Tenure issue key in WSU talks

By Kim Kozlowski

Detroit — Hayg Oshagan spent years teaching, doing research and publishing in scholarly journals when he first was hired on the faculty of Wayne State University. Eventually, he convinced his WSU colleagues that he deserved to have tenure, the hallmark of an academic's life.

 

MLIVE

With fall classes underway, enrollment down less than one percent at GRCC

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Fall classes kicked-off at Grand Rapids Community College today, with enrollment totaling 17,358 students, a slight decrease from last year, administrators said. “We’re off to a great start today,” said Dean of Student Affairs Tina Hoxie. “Students are making their way to classes, and staff are here to make that go as smooth as possible.”

 

Proposed pension changes would save GRCC $1.3 million

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Proposed changes to Michigan’s school employee retirement benefit system will save Grand Rapids Community College approximately $1.3 million this year, administrators said.

 

Western Michigan University welcomes freshmen to campus with slew of events

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – College freshmen, bubbling with excitement, are unloading their lives into dorm rooms at Western Michigan University this week. For the Harrisons, of Wyoming, Mich., moving the 18-year-old baby of their family, Lyndsee, into her dorm room is a true family affair.

 

Monday, August 27, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Commentary: Oakland University is helping students focus on the finish line

By Gary Russi

It is well documented that obtaining a college degree is a critical investment for most people looking to succeed in life. On average, college graduates earn at least $30,000 more per year than high school graduates, and the return on investment is even higher for advanced degree holders.  None of this matters, however, if and when a student is unable to complete his or her college education.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Largest class in MSU history moves into the dorms

By Paul Henderson

EAST LANSING — For Robert Thomas of Detroit, going through the moving process a second time wasn’t any easier. “It is always a challenge,” said Thomas who was helping his son, Robert Thomas Jr. move-in to East Akers Hall at Michigan State University Sunday.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: On College Move-In Day, Resist the U-Haul

 

ANNARBOR.COM

How U-M course registration has evolved over time

By Kellie Woodhouse

Another fall of classes is upon us, and with it is an estimated 6,000 University of Michigan freshmen who will be orienting themselves to the college lifestyle for the first time. Students will unpack belongings into the dorms and get acquainted with the landscape that will surround them for the next four years.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Endowments Grow From Chalkboards to the Sidelines

By ADAM HIMMELSBACH

Joel Smilow, a former chairman and chief executive of Playtex, is a philanthropist whose name is attached to hospitals, Boys and Girls Clubs, and buildings at Yale, his alma mater. But for Smilow, whose college athletics career did not progress beyond intramurals, perhaps the most unusual outcome of his benevolence is a permanent link to the Bulldogs football team. In 1988, he gave $1 million to endow Yale’s coaching position. Future coaches would forever be the Joel E. Smilow ’54 Head Coach of Yale Football. The title does not exactly flow, but the money from the endowment does.

 

Sunday, August 26, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

WSU students scope out new digs on move-in day

By Ann Zaniewski

Tiara Gooch and her mother fought back tears on the trip from Flint to Wayne State University's Ghafari Residence Hall on Saturday. "It's like going from seeing my family every day to every other weekend," said Gooch, 17, standing on a bustling sidewalk on Anthony Wayne Drive in Detroit with a basketball under her arm.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Freshmen migration begins at Wayne State

> DETROIT NEWS: Lamps, rugs, high hopes fill Wayne State on move-in day

 

MLIVE

Kenowa High School students finish first Davenport University class, seeking diploma and associate's degree

By Monica Scott

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - While their classmates enjoyed summer break, 15 Kenowa High School juniors spent three hours a day in their first college class - Career and Education Seminar (FRSM) - a required course for most Davenport University freshmen.

 

Saturday, August 25, 2012

 

MLIVE

Kalamazoo College ranks in Princeton Review's top 377 Colleges and for having 'least religious students'

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College was named to the Best Midwestern College list by Princeton Review, but the college was also ranked as one of the nation’s Best 377 Colleges, as No. 4 for popular study abroad programs, and No. 19 for having the least religious students.

 

Saginaw Valley State University expands reach, draws 60 percent of students from outside Saginaw, Bay, Midland counties

By Lindsay Knake

KOCHVILLE TOWNSHIP, MI — Saginaw Valley State University has grown from a regional college to one that attracts students from all over the state. It’s part of a deliberate effort to expand SVSU’s reach, said J.J. Boehm, SVSU communications director.

 

Friday, August 24, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Oakland University, faculty near contract deadline

By Lauren Abdel-Razzaq

Rochester — With fall classes starting in less than two weeks, Oakland University administrators and faculty have not reached an agreement on a new contract. A contract between the administration and the 700-member Oakland University chapter of the American Association of University Professors expired last week. Both sides agreed to extend the contract until 5 p.m. today. It's an expression of good faith," said Karen Miller, president of the AAUP chapter. "At this time, it's really premature to talk about job actions."

Related story:

> OAKLAND PRESS: Oakland University temporarily extends workers' union contract for fourth time as both sides continue bargaining in efforts to avoid strike

 

MLIVE

How Aquinas College attracted a record number of new students for fall semester

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Aquinas College President Juan Olivarez welcomed students back to campus Thursday morning, marking the start of his second year overseeing the Catholic, liberal arts college. Already, he says it’s shaping up to be a big year for the college, with its incoming class – which includes freshmen and transfers – pegged at approximately 600 students, a 13.6 percent increase from last year.

 

Michigan State on-campus residents begin move-in this weekend

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- In just a few days, Michigan State University's campus will return to its normal bustling status as on-campus residents move in for the fall semester. First-year students begin moving in on Sunday at 8 a.m., while returning students move in on Monday. Fall semester classes begin on Wednesday.

 

EMU and clerical workers reach tentative 'eleventh-hour' agreement after six months of tense negotiations

By Kellie Woodhouse

Six months of tense contract negotiations may be at an end after Eastern Michigan University clerical workers and administrators reached a tentative four-year contract agreement. The compromise comes after the majority of union members voted down an offer in early July, rallied against what they considered unreasonable bargaining and commissioned a plane to fly in the sky and carry a banner claiming university President Susan Martin is "unfair to clericals."

 

Thursday, August 23, 2012

 

MLIVE

A $100,000 scholarship helps make one student's dream of college a reality

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Erin Rhodes knew that covering tuition payments at Hope College would be a grueling task. In fact, Rhodes, who lives outside Chicago, even considered skipping out on Hope altogether, fearing that the college’s annual cost – pegged at nearly $40,000 – would leave her burdened with thousands of dollars in debt.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Does it matter that an elite university lied to college rankers for years?

By Valerie Strauss

Since 2000, Emory University submitted false admissions data to college rankers and other organizations that showed higher test scores and class rankings than the Atlanta school’s students actually had. The school just did a public mea culpa and promised never to do it again.

 

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

 

MLIVE

Calvin College named a "stone-cold sober" school

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- If you’re a college student looking to party, Calvin College isn’t the place to be. That's according to the Princeton Review, which ranked the private, Christian liberal arts college No. 10 on its list of 20 “stone-cold sober” colleges and universities across the U.S.

 

Van Andel Graduate School launches sixth school year

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The Van Andel Institute Graduate School kicked off its sixth school year this week, hosting its annual convocation and welcoming five new Ph.D candidates into its program.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Oakland University faculty contract extended pending new deal

By David Jesse

The contract between Oakland University and its professors' union has been extended again as the two sides try to hammer out a new deal. The university and the faculty union were supposed to bargain on Monday, but a state mediator involved in the talks had to cancel.

 

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

2 new studies weigh value, cost of college -- Education worth it, but middle class goes deep in debt to get it

By Justin Pope

Two new studies offer emphatic answers to much-discussed questions about higher education: Yes, a college degree is worth it, but yes, it's the middle-class that's getting particularly squeezed with student debt in the pursuit of one. The first, released last week by the Lumina Foundation and Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce, seems to thoroughly demolish the idea that the Great Recession diminished the value of a college degree. Yes, recent college grads have struggled more than usual to find jobs. But overall, even as unemployment was rising past 10 percent, the authors found the economy actually added 200,000 jobs for workers with a bachelor's degree. Since the recovery began, it's created 2 million more.

 

MLIVE

Incoming WMU freshmen required to take alcohol safety, finance management course

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Incoming Western Michigan University freshman Brandon Weber spent at least six hours this summer taking three mandatory online quizzes about alcohol use, managing his finances and about the university. WMU for the first time is imposing the requirement for the approximately 3,100 incoming freshman students. The quizzes are to be taken online by students before they move to campus at the end of August.

 

How GRCC's job training programs are helping displaced workers find careers

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Greg Wiseman found himself out of work for the first time in more than three decades in March 2011 when he was laid off from Steelcase. But thanks to the education he’s received at Grand Rapids Community College’s Leslie E. Tassell M-TEC workforce training center, Wiseman is just a few months away from earning a certificate in the center’s Construction Trades program.

 

LIVINGSTON COUNTY DAILY PRESS & ARGUS

Big plan on campus: Cleary University putting together athletic facility

By Christopher Behnan

What looks like a mostly empty warehouse will soon be a state-of-the-art community athletic facility on Cleary University's Genoa Township campus, university officials said. The in-progress Cleary University Recreation and Wellness Center is part of Cleary's goal to build a "complete campus" in Livingston County in conjunction with a comprehensive collegiate athletics program, the officials said.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Free Online Course Will Rely on Multiple Sites

By TAMAR LEWIN

A group of online-learning ventures is collaborating on a new kind of free class to be offered this fall, known as a mechanical MOOC (for “massive open online course”), that will teach a computer-programming language by patching together existing resources from open-learning sites. Unlike courses already available online, the new class will not require a traditional instructor, or a large start-up investment.

 

USA TODAY

A cheat sheet to what makes today's college freshmen click

By Mary Beth Marklein

For this year's crop of college freshmen, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Kurt Cobain have always been dead, women have always piloted warplanes and space shuttles, and M&Ms have never been tan. The class of 2016 grew up in cyberspace, a factor that has increasingly influenced how today's undergraduates approach the world, authors of two recent works say

 

Monday, August 20, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Oakland University, faculty union to meet today to work on new contract

By David Jesse

With the clock rapidly ticking down toward the expiration of the existing contract and the start of classes just 15 days away, negotiators from the Oakland University administration and the faculty union will spend today talking in hopes of coming to a labor agreement. The contract between the union and OU was extended twice last week and now is to expire at 11:59 p.m. today. "We're very interested in having a contract," said union president Karen Miller, a political history professor. "We want to have a normal start to the academic year."

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Rents of the Big Ten: Ann Arbor luxury student housing market among most expensive in Midwest

By Kellie Woodhouse

Sweeping views of the city, ultra-modern gathering spaces, in-house theaters, flat screens your parents would envy and state-of-that art gyms just steps away. Rental rates ranging from $800 to $1,745 per bed a month. Luxurious indeed.

 

Sunday, August 19, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Saudis send large student delegation to WMU

By Associated Press

Kalamazoo — Western Michigan University is getting ready for the arrival of 300 students from Saudi Arabia, one of the country's largest delegations on U.S. campuses. Saudi students also are the largest single national group among international students on the Kalamazoo campus. The students acknowledge the challenges that they face coming from a Middle Eastern country. And having fellow Saudis around can slow the acculturation process, they say.

Related stories:

> MLIVE: Some 300 Saudi Arabian students heading to WMU this fall; many struggling to connect with Americans

> MLIVE: Western Michigan University continues reach for international students; signs agreements with Malaysian, Turkish institutions

 

Saturday, August 18, 2012

 

MLIVE

President Lou Anna K. Simon reminds Michigan State employees of obligation to report sexual assault

By Brandon Howell

EAST LANSING, MI -- In the wake of the tumultuous scandal at Penn State University, Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon has made it clear to her employees what their positions and duties obligate them to do in cases of sexual assault and abuse. In an email sent Thursday to the university's more than 11,000 faculty and staff, Simon reminded workers that MSU protocol mandates them to immediately report cases of suspected child abuse, sexual assault and child pornography to the campus police department.

 

How GVSU and Aquinas College landed a spot on a list of America's "greenest" colleges

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Energy use is being reduced. More trash is being recycled and composted. And new buildings are designed in a way that helps reduce utility costs. Sustainability – policies that are good for the environment as well as an organization’s bottom line – is more than a buzzword at Grand Valley State University and Aquinas College, administrators say. It’s among the principles that guide the colleges in everything from building projects and program development to how cafeteria workers dispose of leftover food.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

A College Lifts a Hurdle for Illegal Immigrants

By DAN FROSCH

DENVER — Monday is the first day of the school year for Metropolitan State University of Denver, a compact, urban campus in the heart of the city’s downtown. It also signifies the dawn of a controversial new policy for this institution of 24,000. Among the crowd of students who will show up for class next week are dozens of illegal immigrants who, as part of a specially tailored tuition rate, can now qualify for a reduced fee if they live in Colorado.

 

Friday, August 17, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Shirvell ordered to pay $4.5M in damages for slamming gay U-M student body president in blog

By David Jesse

A former state assistant attorney general will have to pay $4.5 million in damages after a federal jury ruled his blog attacking a University of Michigan student body president for his “radical homosexual agenda” went too far.

Andrew Shirvell, a 2002 U-M alumnus drew national attention for his blog, which he published in 2010, attacking then-U-M student body president Chris Armstrong. The blog – the “Chris Armstrong Watch” – was filled with posts made by Shirvell, including ones calling Armstrong, who was the first openly gay student body president at U-M, “Satan’s representative on the student assembly” and a “privileged pervert.”

Related stories:

> DETROIT NEWS: Jury awards $4.5 million to gay former U-M student body president

> MICHIGAN DAILY: Shirvell ordered to pay Armstrong $4.5 million in damages

 

DETROIT NEWS

Wayne County Community College District seeks 1-mill increase

By Kim Kozlowski

Wayne County Community College District will ask residents in November to approve 1 mill for 10 years to offset an unprecedented decline in property tax revenues, officials said Thursday. The community college — which has an enrollment of about 72,000 students on five campuses — has lost more than $30 million over the past two and a half years. Chancellor Curtis Ivery attributed the loss to the economy and property devaluations, foreclosures and residents leaving Detroit. Unlike state universities, community colleges depend primarily on property taxes for operating revenue, along with tuition.

 

MLIVE

Improper fees: Company used by GRCC must repay $11 million to students

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- A company Grand Rapids Community College – and hundreds of other higher education institutions – partners with to provide tuition refunds to students has been fined for charging improper fees. Under a settlement with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., Higher One Holdings Inc. must pay a $110,000 civil fine and refund approximately $11 million to 60,000 students nationwide. In addition, the FDIC said that Bancorp Bank, which issued the OneAccount debit card administered by Higher One, is paying a $172,000 fine.

 

Thursday, August 16, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Shirvell testifies about Armstrong's 'radical homosexual agenda' as U-M case goes to jury

By David Jesse

Andrew Shirvell, a former assistant state attorney general, testified Wednesday that he has "no hatred in his heart" for Chris Armstrong, but still believes Armstrong was trying to push a "radical homosexual agenda" as University of Michigan student body president. Shirvell, acting as his own attorney, took the stand in the final day of testimony in the trial of the federal lawsuit filed against Shirvell by Armstrong nearly two years ago. The case in U.S. District Court in Detroit was sent to the jury Wednesday afternoon.

 

MLIVE

Enrollment on the rise at GRCC but still lagging behind last year

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Fall enrollment at Grand Rapids Community College has grown significantly since June but still remains 3.2 percent below last year’s level. As of this week, there were 15,684 students enrolled at GRCC for fall classes – more than 500 fewer than were signed up for classes at the same time last year, according to GRCC.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland University, profs extend deadline as bargaining talks continue

By CHRIS LAURITSEN

Oakland University and the American Association of University Professors are still working on contract negotiations a day after the 2009 collective bargaining agreement was originally intended to expire. The 2009 agreement, which was set to expire on Aug. 15, was extended by 48 hours as both sides continue bargaining. According to the AAUP, the two sides were hopeful an agreement could have been reached before an extension was necessary.

 

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Olivet, Lake Superior St. must phase out training programs after poor exam scores

By Lori Higgins

Lake Superior State University and Olivet College must begin phasing out significant portions of their teacher preparation programs, mainly because student scores on a state exam for teacher certification aren't high enough. For Lake Superior, that means it can no longer admit students to eight programs, including those that prepare students to become teachers in English, economics, history and biology. For Olivet College, students can no longer be admitted to nine programs, including English, music education, biology and social studies.

Related stories:

> MLIVE: Western Michigan University revamping teacher training programs

> MLIVE: Western Michigan University education program gets 'at risk' grade from state

 

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

 

USA TODAY

Some universities require students to use e-textbooks

By Yasmeen Abutaleb

Students don't seem to want to buy e-textbooks. So some schools are simply forcing them.While several colleges across the country are pushing electronic textbooks, touting them as more efficient and less cumbersome than regular textbooks, students are reluctant. E-textbooks still account for only 9% of textbook purchases, says Student Monitor, which researches college student behavior.

 

Saturday, August 11, 2012

 

MLIVE

WMU custodial, dining, landscaping employees to receive 2 percent raise by 2013

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – About 430 Western Michigan University maintenance, custodial, dining and landscaping employees will receive a 2 percent raise by 2013 after negotiating contracts for six months.

 

Jackson Community College trustees to consider tax proposal for November ballot

By Leanne Smith

SUMMIT TWP., MI – Jackson Community College is considering going to voters with a ballot proposal in November. Ballot language and placement will be discussed and potentially voted on by the college’s Board of Trustees on Monday. The deadline to file ballot language for the November election with the Jackson County Clerk’s Office is Aug. 28.

 

Friday, August 10, 2012

 

MLIVE

Kenowa Hills Middle College students set to begin earning credits through Davenport University

By Monica Scott

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - Fifteen Kenowa Hills High School juniors are gearing up to take their first college course next week on their path to receiving both a high school diploma and associate's degree from Davenport University through a new Middle College program.

 

WMU breaks private gift annual record with $41M; credits new alumni website for boost

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI –  Western Michigan University has increased its private gifts by more than 240 percent in the past year. Private donates gave more than $41 million to WMU from more than 25,800 donors this past year, breaking all previous one-year records. The amount represents an increase of $29,446,110 from the total money raised in the 2010-11 fiscal year.

 

Skype the vote: GRCC trustees debate value of attending meetings virtually

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The Grand Rapids Community College Board of Trustees is considering adopting a policy to allow members to participate in meetings through video conferencing, such as Skype. The college has historically allowed trustees to take part in meetings in such a manner – Bert Bleke has done so twice this year – but a formal policy doesn’t address the issue.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Lansing Community College creating new path to tackle math

By Matthew Miller

Carla Craig went back to school this summer after 17 years away, her eye on a business degree from Lansing Community College. Of the challenges ahead of her, it’s math that seems the most daunting. “I’m at the point of feeling like I need so much help,” she said, describing the placement test she took earlier this year as “horrible.”

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan 7th on Bloomberg list of top undergraduate business schools

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan’s Stephen M. Ross School of Business came in at No. 7 this year in Bloomberg Businessweek’s annual rankings of the best undergraduate business schools. U-M dropped one spot from its sixth-place ranking on last year’s list. Over the past six years it has ranked as high as 4 and as low as 8. The University of Notre Dame maintained its No. 1 ranking on the list, a position it has now held for three years.

 

USA TODAY

Texas college bans pork from campus dining

By Allie Grasgreen

You, too, can be O.K. without pork.That's the message of Michael J. Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College in Dallas. Well, part of the message at least - after all, Sorrell didn't ban pork from his campus dining facilities arbitrarily. No - the decision to stop offering any pork products was based in a much broader institutional philosophy, the president says.

 

Thursday, August 9, 2012

 

MLIVE

Michigan State's MBA program ranked 20th in nation by Bloomberg Businessweek

By Brandon Howell

Michigan State University offers one of the country's top 20 educations in master of business administration curricula, according to rankings compiled by Bloomberg Businessweek. The weekly business magazine ranks the MSU Broad College of Business' full-time MBA program as No. 20 in the United States. The rankings are based on three elements: a student survey, a survey of corporate recruiters, and an intellectual capital rating.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: Is Michigan State Really Better than Yale?

 

What does it take to get a $50,000 scholarship to Western Michigan University?

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Mattawan High School graduate Zachary Hummel is one of 20 freshmen who are receiving prestigious scholarships to Western Michigan University this fall thanks to the merit-based Medallion scholarship. Valued at $50,000 each over four years, the scholarships are one of the largest merit-based awards in American higher education, according to WMU. This year’s recipients have an average ACT score of 32 and a grade point average of 4.30.

 

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

 

MLIVE

WMU Board of Trustees to consider custodian, dining employee contract on Friday

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The Western Michigan University Board of Trustees will consider an employee contract  at a special conference meeting. The meeting is scheduled for 11 a.m. on Friday at the Connable Board Room on the second floor of the Bernhard Center.

 

Ferris State University professor aims to change how students think about pharmacy

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- Pharmacists have a role fighting chronic health problems such as high blood pressure and diabetes, but one Ferris State University professor says their involvement shouldn’t begin or end with medication. College of Pharmacy professor Mary Frances Ross wants her students to begin thinking about how they can serve patients not only with medication, but also by nudging them to embrace healthy behaviors such as exercise and a better diet.

 

What GVSU learned from first graduates of new MBA program

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- If there’s one testament to the success of Grand Valley State University’s new masters of business administration program, it’s this: half the students who graduated in July landed jobs with businesses they interned at. Six of the first 12 students to complete the university’s full-time, integrated MBA program, launched in March 2011, now work for companies ranging from Steelcase and American Seating to Consumers Energy and Priority Health. Those are among the companies where students performed an 11-month paid fellowship.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Jury will hear trial involving gay U-M student, lawyer

By The Associated Press

Jury selection is starting in a civil lawsuit against a former state of Michigan lawyer who is accused of stalking and defaming a gay student government president at the University of Michigan. An attorney for Chris Armstrong says she would drop the case if ex-Assistant Attorney General Andrew Shirvell apologized. Instead, the case is going to trial Tuesday in Detroit federal court.

 

USA TODAY

Online education degrees skyrocket

By Greg Toppo and Christopher Schnaars

Virtually unknown a decade ago, big online teacher education programs now dwarf their traditional competitors, outstripping even the largest state university teachers' colleges.A USA TODAY analysis of newly released U.S. Department of Education data finds that four big universities, operating mostly online, have quickly become the largest education schools in the USA. Last year the four — three of which are for-profit — awarded one in 16 bachelor's degrees and post-graduate awards and nearly one in 11 advanced education awards, including master's degrees and doctorates.

 

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Oakland University students will pay 2.96% more in tuition next year

By David Jesse

Students at Oakland University will pay 2.96% more in tuition next year, the Board of Trustees decided Monday afternoon. With the increase, undergraduate students will pay $10.25 more per credit hour. Graduate students will pay $17 more per credit hour. The increase will cost an undergraduate student carrying 30 credits about $307 more per year, based on 30 credits, or a total of about $10,706. The school doesn’t tack on any fees.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Oakland University raises in-state tuition 2.96 percent

 

DETROIT NEWS

Commentary: Profit motive and education don't mix well

By John Crisp

The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions issued a report last week with a revealing title: "For-Profit Higher Education: The Failure to Safeguard the Federal Investment and Ensure Student Success." The 14-page executive summary will tell you all you need to know: Every year, hundreds of thousands of students emerge from the for-profit sector of higher education with, as the summary puts it, "debt but no degree." For-profit higher education has exploded in the United States during the last decade. Most of the newly created colleges are owned by publicly traded, private-equity owned, or closely held companies, which means that they answer to shareholders who expect an increasing profit margin.

 

MLIVE

Calvin beats out Hope in college rankings

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- When it comes to higher education in Grand Rapids, Calvin College tops the list. That’s according to Forbes magazine, which has released its annual rankings of what it believes are the nation’s top 650 colleges and universities. Calvin was listed at No. 169, coming out ahead of rival Hope College, which ranked No. 223.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan ranked among the best colleges to work for in 2012

By Kellie Woodhouse

The Chronicle of Higher Education named the University of Michigan's Ann Arbor campus one of the best colleges to work for in 2012. The Chronicle surveyed roughly 47,000 faculty and staff at 294 institutions and ranked 103 schools as among the best institutions at which to work. U-M received an honor roll distinction, the highest ranking, along with 29 other large four-year schools.

 

Monday, August 6, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Discovery Channel to feature GVSU's Annis Water Resources Institute

By Brian McVicar

MUSKEGON, MI -- Grand Valley State University’s Annis Water Resources Institute in Muskegon is about to get a moment in the national spotlight. The institute, which is primarily focused on freshwater research, will be featured in a six-minute segment on the Discovery Channel’s The Profile Series.

 

Saturday, August 4, 2012

 

MLIVE

How GVSU engineering students' projects help keep jobs in West Michigan

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Glenn Clapp graduated from Grand Valley State University Friday, but the engineering student can already boast that he’s helped create a product that will help some West Michigan manufacturers. Clapp was among five students from GVSU’s Padnos College of Engineering and Computing who made a mobile robotics training module to prepare workers to use such technology in assembly line or manufacturing work.

 

Kalamazoo College seeks public input for 10-year reaccreditation

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College is asking the public to share their opinions about the college with the Higher Learning Commission, as part of the institution’s evaluation for re-accreditation before Aug. 31. College officials spend more than two years preparing and undergoing the re-accreditation process, which happens every 10 years, according to K-College Provost Michael McDonald.

 

How Grand Rapids Community College is trying to boost student performance

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Developmental education courses have long been a barrier to success for students at Grand Rapids Community College, but administrators are hoping several new initiatives will help change that.

 

Friday, August 3, 2012

 

MLIVE

K-College ranks No. 65 in Forbes America's Top College list; see all Michigan rankings

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo higher education institutions are climbing up in the Forbes’ annual America’s Top Colleges rankings list. Kalamazoo College was ranked No. 65 and Western Michigan University is ranked No. 617 in the nation.

 

WMU College of Education dean Van Cooley dies; praised for his dedication to education

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI –The Western Michigan University community today is mourning the loss of Van Cooley, the interim dean of the College of Education and Human Development known as a passionate advocate for education.

 

Western Michigan University: Spending $41,170 on lobbying lawmakers is 'necessary'

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University lobbyist Katie DeBoer John said there’s nothing lavish about the university spending $41,170 on lobbying state lawmakers in 2011. And compared to what other universities are spending on having  friends in the right places, one could agree.

 

Why GVSU is putting weight in teaching international perspectives

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Grand Valley State University has long strived to prepare students to live and work in a global world, but a new initiative aims to answer just how good a job it’s doing. The university this fall is launching a study to determine how well it’s infusing an international perspective into everything from curriculum and student life to the makeup of faculty and staff.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Wall Street Journal: U-M school among growing number of business colleges with women at helm

By Kellie Woodhouse

Business school deanships are dominated by men, but that's slowly changing, according to a recent Wall Street Journal article. Last year, 18 percent of business school deans were women, according to the article, and many top-tier business schools are "acting affirmatively" and recruiting women when deanships become available, said Lucy Apthorp Leske, a top search firm partner.

 

Thursday, August 2, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

WSU, faculty extend contract

Wayne State University and its faculty union signed an eleventh-hour extension to the union's existing contract, university spokesman Tom Reynolds said Wednesday. The contract, which was to expire at midnight Tuesday, now runs through September, keeping terms of the current contract in place. The two sides will continue to bargain.

 

DETROIT NEWS

Editorial: Wayne State right to tackle tenure

Wayne State University would like to change the process for dismissing tenured faculty members. And while the union that represents professors is creating a big fuss, the proposed contract language is fair. Most importantly, if the changes stick, they will give the administration the ability to regain more control of university costs.

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University included on national list of top sales programs

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The Sales Education Foundation has included Western Michigan University on its list of the top sales and business marketing programs in the country. "There are a relatively small number of universities that formally offer sales as a major," says Dr. Stephen Newell, WMU professor of sales and business marketing. "At many institutions, sales is offered via sales-related classes or as a concentration. Offering the program as a major lends greater credibility to a student's degree."

 

Hope College anticipating record fall enrollment

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Hope College, for the second year in a row, is anticipating its largest freshmen class on record. Through July, the college had registered more than 900 freshmen, a number that surpasses last year’s record high of 848 students, the college said. Hope officially counts enrollment in September.

 

Western Michigan University investing less in U.S. stocks, more in REITS and global bonds

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University is changing where its investing its money from domestic to international assets to decrease risk and enhance returns. Jan Van Der Kley, the vice president of business and finance, said had the university diversified its long-term assets earlier, returns would have increased at least 0.4 percent. For the first time, WMU is acquiring assets in real estate investment trusts (REITS), global bonds and bank loans to help diversify its portfolio.

 

WMU director Penny Bundy to serve on national ACT college exam committee

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Western Michigan University’s Director of Admissions Penny Bundy will serve on the Michigan ACT executive committee and will represent the state on the national ACT State Organization for the next three years.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan a top lobbying spender among state colleges

By Kellie Woodhouse

University of Michigan has spent $135,000 on federal lobbyists thus far in 2012. That's the second-highest amount spent by one of Michigan's 15 public universities this year, according to a database compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.

 

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

 

MLIVE

How Kendall College's new president spent his first month in office

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Kendall College of Art and Design President David Rosen has been in office less than a month, but he’s already reaching out to other schools in pursuit of partnerships. Rosen, who formerly served as senior vice president of Woodbury University, a California-based art school, meet with administrators at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills earlier this month, in part, to discuss how the two schools could work together.

 

Led by University of Michigan, state colleges spent $2.1 million lobbying state, federal lawmakers

By Dave Murray

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Michigan universities say they need a presence in Washington and Lansing to advocate for their schools and students and compete for research dollars – spending $2.1 million last year to lobby lawmakers. The University of Michigan devoted the most to the task in 2011, listing $610,000 spent persuading federal lawmakers to send green to the home of the maize and blue, and $106,633 targeted at Lansing politicos -- a total of $716,663 for the year.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Oakland Community College extends smoking ban outdoors on campus

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

When students return to Oakland Community College in September they will find that smoking is banned not only in buildings — as it is now — but even outdoors and in students’ cars on all five OCC campuses. Beginning Sept. 1, the use of all tobacco products will be barred on OCC property. That includes cigars, cigarettes, pipes, chewing tobacco and snuff. This also applies to employees, including faculty and staff.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan architect: Wall Street parking structure could be new neighborhood 'gateway'

By Kellie Woodhouse

The University of Michigan envisions its planned six-story parking structure on Wall Street as a landmark that transitions drivers from downtown to Lower Town. "Our parking structure is a gateway to this neighborhood," U-M architect Doug Koepsell told Ann Arbor residents who live near Wall Street. "We want it to look like a building, not like other parking structures.... We are trying to be a good neighbor."

 

WASHINGTON POST

College admissions season begins with launch of 2012-13 Common Application

By Valerie Strauss

Rising high school seniors who want to get a jump on their college applications should know that the Common Application used by more than 450 colleges and universities has just gone live for the 2012-13 admissions season. That means students can start to officially fill out their applications, getting the tedious work of filling out names and dates and other details done so they can work on their essays.

 

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

 

MLIVE

Denominational affiliation changing among students at Hope College

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Enrollment is growing at Hope College, but there’s at least one group of students whose attendance isn't going in the direction administrators want. The number of students who identify themselves as members of the Reformed Church in America, an institution Hope has deep ties with, is shrinking.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Another tuition increase being considered for Oakland University

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

Oakland University is one of the last of Michigan’s 15 public four-year universities to vote on its tuition rate, but if OU follows the trend, students can count on a tuition increase of more than an average of 3.5 percent. Oakland University Board of Trustees are expected to vote on the 2012-2013 operating budget and tuition increase at 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 6. The board was scheduled to make the decision in June, but postponed their meeting until after most university boards have voted on their budgets in June and July.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

UC reaching out to depressed students online

By Stephen Ceasar

The anonymous online conversation began after the student revealed that he planned to kill himself. "What should I do?" the sophomore asked a counselor at his Midwest college. "I figure you will probably tell me that killing myself is not a good idea, and I know that. But it does seem like a good option at the moment."

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Lawrence Tech graduates earn Metro Detroit's highest return on college investment

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. – Lawrence Technological University ranked highest in the metropolitan Detroit three-county area and placed in the top 20 percent of colleges and universities nationwide in a new Bloomberg Businessweek national survey on the increased earning power generated by a college bachelor’s degree. In this survey conducted by Payscale, a Seattle-based compensation data firm, the net return on investment (ROI) was determined by averaging the earnings of a college’s graduates in 30 years in 2012 dollars and then subtracting the 2011 cost of a bachelor’s degree at the college and the average 30-year earnings of contemporaries who started working right after high school.

 

USA TODAY

For-profit colleges bilking public, senator says

By Ryan Randazzo, The Arizona Republic

A senator's examination of for-profit colleges paints them as dropout factories, where billions of dollars are squandered on financial aid and the schools' emphasis is more on attracting students than educating them. The result, according to the report: Too many students are left with bad debt and no degree. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, released his report this week after two years probing the education industry, its profits and sometimes aggressive recruiting techniques.

Related stories:

> USA TODAY: Editorial: For-profit college. What a racket.

> USA TODAY: Opposing view: Private-sector colleges fill a need

 

Monday, July 30, 2012 

 

DETROIT NEWS

Mich. Tech opens new research center

By Jim Lynch

Houghton — One could argue there has never been a better time for Michigan Technological University to unveil a $25 million research facility to address the most pressing issues of the Great Lakes. A seemingly endless list of problems faces the lakes these days — from invasive species to climate change — that call into question the future of the region's greatest natural resource.

 

Sunday, July 29, 2012 

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Senate Committee Report on For-Profit Colleges Condemns Costs and Practices

By TAMAR LEWIN

Wrapping up a two-year investigation of for-profit colleges, Senator Tom Harkin will issue a final report on Monday — a voluminous, hard-hitting indictment of almost every aspect of the industry, filled with troubling statistics and anecdotes drawn from internal documents of the 30 companies investigated. According to the report, which was posted online in advance, taxpayers spent $32 billion in the most recent year on companies that operate for-profit colleges, but the majority of students they enroll leave without a degree, half of those within four months.

Related story:

> WASHINGTON POST: Report finds for-profit colleges serve shareholders over students

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Editorial: Teacher tenure must adapt to university realities

There's a joke about university tenure that goes something like this: One reason God was denied tenure was because he rarely showed up to teach his class, and just told students to read the book. That joke reflects a long-acknowledged truth about tenure -- the difficulty some people have in obtaining it. But Wayne State University is struggling with how to change the flip side of tenure: the near impossible chances that universities can review, or even remove, professors who have it.

 

DETROIT NEWS

MSU aims to improve bike offerings

By Associated Press

East Lansing— Michigan State University is aiming to make it easier for people to buy bikes that have been donated or impounded and get them fixed up.

 

MLIVE

Jackson Community College replacing its campus security department with private company

By Leanne Smith

SUMMIT TWP., MI – Jackson Community College is dissolving its campus security department and privatizing the service in hopes of saving about $300,000 in this year’s budget. The transition is scheduled to take place Aug. 1, college officials said. Security services on JCC’s main Summit Township campus and its soon-to-open north campus in the former Photo Marketing Association headquarters in Blackman Township now will be handled by ArmorKnight Security Inc. of Adrian.

 

Not just a boys club: Demand climbing for women in science, engineering, math fields

By Blake Thorne

FLINT, MI -- Like something out of a movie or crime drama, Kailey Doherty studied the DNA strand, looking for a possible match. The 17 year old was trying to catch a killer. OK, not a real killer. But the lab simulation did use real DNA, and the teenage girls gathered at Kettering University were using the same techniques put to work to solve high-profile cases across the country.

 

Pay increases for administrators, faculty, plus more student financial aid, included in WMU's 2012-13 budget

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Western Michigan University administrators and faculty members, university police and graduate assistants will see their salaries increase in the 2012-13 academic year. On Wednesday, the board approved a $358.5 million general fund budget for the next school year.

 

Saturday, July 28, 2012

 

MLIVE

GVSU receives $1 million donation for Annis Water Resources Institute building

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- An effort by Grand Valley State University to construct a new research building at its Annis Water Resources Institute has gotten a boost from the Community Foundation for Muskegon County.

 

Starbucks' new environmentally friendly coffee-cup sleeve validated by Western Michigan University paper program

 By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — Starbucks Coffee Company says Western Michigan University is backing its claims that its new hot-cup ‘EarthSleeve’ is environmentally friendly.

 

Friday, July 27, 2012

 

MLIVE

Why GVSU is the 'gold standard' for faculty and staff fundraising

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- When it comes to faculty and staff fundraising, Grand Valley State University just might be the “gold standard.” That’s according to Karen Loth, GVSU’s vice president of university development, who recently reported that more than 55 percent of faculty and staff participated in GVSU’s most recent annual fundraising campaign. They committed to more than $537,000.

 

Fewer employees than projected took Jackson Community College buyout

By Leanne Smith

SUMMIT TWP., MI – Twenty employees accepted Jackson Community College’s buyout package, resulting in about a $548,000 savings for the college next year. File PhotoTwenty Jackson Community College employees accepted a buyout that will help JCC save more than a half-million dollars next year. Fewer faculty than anticipated took the one-time offer, and those who did will have to be replaced due to terms in the faculty contract, said Cindy Allen JCC spokeswoman. In all, 13 of the 20 positions will be refilled, Allen said.

 

Hope College names new Board of Trustees members

By Brian McVicar

HOLLAND, MI -- Hope College’s 31-member Board of Trustees has elected four new members. The new members are:

 

WMU to borrow up to $8.5 million for Western View student housing expansion

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University administrators are moving forward with their plans to expand the Western View apartment complex next year by allowing the university to borrow up to $8.5 million for the construction of two new apartment buildings and a community center.

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Student loan debt threatens graduates' financial future

By Susan Tompor

Janelle O'Hara knows her college debt isn't anything close to the financial migraine hitting other college grads. The 24-year-old pays $150 a month for her $17,000 in federal student loans -- not much next to the $300 or $400 a month that some of her friends pay.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

An Outsourcing Plan Stirs Fear at Texas A&M

By REEVE HAMILTON and MATTHEW WATKINS

When the Texas A&M University System announced that its flagship would gain $260 million in new revenue and savings in the next 10 years by outsourcing its building maintenance, landscaping and dining services, Chancellor John Sharp said the plan was an unprecedented way to raise money in financially struggling higher education.

 

Thursday, July 26, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University students 'not surprised' by growing tuition costs trustees approve 3.91 percent increase

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University students are anything but surprised that tuition and required fees are increasing by at least $376 this fall. “I’m used to it,” said computer engineering senior Aaron Clark, who was studying at the Bernhard Center on Wednesday, after WMU Board of Trustees approved increasing tuition 3.91 percent for the 2012-13 academic year. “I don’t have any family contributions, so I rely entirely on financial aid, but there’s not much I can do about it.”

Related stories:

> MLIVE: Tuition hiked 3.91 percent, or $376 for 2012-13, at Western Michigan University

> MLIVE: Western Michigan University Board of Trustees to vote on tuition rates and fees today

 

 

WMU School of Medicine operations taking form; trustees approve borrowing up to $30 million for downtown building

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The Western Michigan University Board of Trustees today approved borrowing up to $30 million to renovate the School of Medicine building in downtown Kalamazoo.

 

Central Michigan University utilizes Facebook Timeline to celebrate 120th anniversary

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Central Michigan Normal School and Business Institute opened Sept. 13, 1892 with 31 students in a rented building in Mount Pleasant. Nearly 120 years later, the school is now Michigan’s fourth largest public university with 22,000 students studying on a 440-acre campus.

 

LANSING STATE JOURNAL

Lansing Community College provost set to lead college in Pennsylvania

By Matthew Miller

Stephanie Shanblatt, the provost of Lansing Community College, has been named the next president of a community college in eastern Pennsylvania.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

Smoking bans: Tobacco-free college campuses on rise in US

By Kimberly Railey

The war on tobacco is going to college. At a growing number of campuses nationwide, total bans on cigarettes and other tobacco products are showing up, barring students from lighting up anywhere on school grounds – even in the open air. The most recent school system to snuff out campus tobacco was the Ohio public college system when the Board of Regents on Monday recommended an all-out prohibition on tobacco products. In June, the University System of Maryland announced its 12 institutions, inside and out, would go smoke-free by next July. Come September, the use and advertising of tobacco will be forbidden anywhere at schools within the City University of New York system.

 

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

 

MLIVE

Scholars to focus on development challenges in Africa at Western Michigan University conference

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University will host policy makers, investors and scholars interested in the development of African states this weekend at the International Conference on African Development. “Sustainable development and democratic good governance remain the greatest challenges for Africa in the 21st century," says conference director Sisay Asefa, WMU professor of economics and director of the University's Center for African Development Policy Research. "Our conference provides an independent forum where people can freely discuss their research and views regarding democratic governance to promote sustainable development for all African nations.”

 

GRCC hopeful $4 million federal job training program leads to permanent jobs

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Administrators at Grand Rapids Community College are hopeful that a federally funded job training program which will wrap up this month will provide participants a lasting place in the workforce.

 

Ed Martini named associate dean of WMU College of Arts and Sciences

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Edwin Martini will  become the new associate dean of Western Michigan University's College of Arts and Sciences. In his new position, Martini will focus on student enrollment management, assessing curriculum and developing academic programs beginning on Aug. 1.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

EMU regents approve four-year agreement with police officers union

The Eastern Michigan University Board of Regents unanimously approved a four-year contract for the 21-member police officers union. The new agreement awards EMU Police Officers Association members a 0 percent raise the first year, a 1 percent raise the second year and a 2 percent raise the third and fourth years.

 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

University of Illinois law school censured, fined $250,000

 By Jodi S. Cohen

The University of Illinois' law school has been censured and fined $250,000 for intentionally publishing false admissions data to make the student body look more academically accomplished than it was.

It is the first time the American Bar Association has fined a university for reporting inaccurate consumer data, according to an ABA spokesman. The sanctions also require that the College of Law prominently post a copy of the censure on its website and hire a compliance monitor for the next two years to check the school's admissions process and data reporting.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Berkeley to Join the Free Online Learning Partnership EdX

By TAMAR LEWIN

In the scramble to stake out a leadership role in the world of online education, the University of California, Berkeley, is announcing on Tuesday that it is joining edX, the free nonprofit online learning venture founded by Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Wayne State, faculty clash over proposal to alter tenure

By David Jesse

Wayne State University professors are up in arms over a proposal they say represents an attempt by administrators to effectively eliminate tenure and the protection it offers against losing their jobs. The administration says it is not trying to eliminate the tenure system -- it merely wants to simplify the process for getting rid of poorly performing faculty and gain flexibility in closing programs for financial reasons. At the heart of the issue is when and under what circumstances the university can fire or lay off tenured faculty.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: WSU tenure plan seen as sticking point in labor talks

 

Professor with history of sexual harassment to stay at EMU

By David Jesse

An Eastern Michigan University business school professor suspended, then twice denied tenure for sexual harassment of students and staff will spend at least one more year on campus, drawing a salary of nearly $120,000.

 

MLIVE

WMU Board of Trustees to set tuition rates, adopt general fund budget, consider BTR Park land sale on Wednesday

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The Western Michigan University Board of Trustees will consider adopting tuition rates and a general fund budget for the 2012-2013 year, and selling a parcel of land in the WMU Business Technology and Research Park at a meeting Wednesday morning.

 

Aquinas College receives $1.5 million gift for sports and physical fitness center

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Aquinas College on Monday announced a prominent alumnus has donated $1.5 million toward a 70,000-square-foot sports and fitness center the school plans on breaking ground on this fall.

 

Calvin College receives $375,622 state grant to help clean up Plaster Creek

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Calvin College has received a $375,622 state grant to strengthen cleanup efforts in the Plaster Creek watershed, long one of the region’s most polluted streams. The grant, from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, will be used for community education efforts, faculty and student research, and to reduce storm water running into the creek.

 

As federal agencies scrutinize private student loans, see how West Michigan colleges stack up

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Private student loans should be a last resort for borrowers, but they grew over the past decade as lenders expanded marketing efforts and loosened lending standards, administrators at West Michigan colleges and universities said.

 

Monday, July 23, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

Hundreds dance the wobble for a good cause: Sending black students to college

By Christina Hall

They jumped forward and jumped back. Swayed their hips, leaned to the left, then leaned to the right, waved their hands and cha-chaed -- all for a good cause. About 200 people danced the wobble in a flash mob Saturday at the band shell on Belle Isle as a promotional event for the United Negro College Fund's 5K Walk for Education on Aug. 25.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

EMU 'Regents had to protect' university with Susan Martin letter

Eastern Michigan University Board of Regents chair Roy Wilbanks said in an email to an EMU alumnus the “regents had to protect” the university, “hence the letter” in which the board formally reprimanded President Susan Martin. The letter to Martin -among documents posted July 10 on the EMU website - followed an April event in Washington D.C. when she got into an argument with alumnus Mike Ferens after consuming alcohol.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Guns at school

By Valerie Strauss

 “Guns have no place in schools,” Arizona State University President Michael Crow was quoted as saying by the Arizona Republic when Gov. Jan Brewer issued a surprise veto this year against legislation that would have allowed guns to be carried on college and university campuses. The story is different in Colorado.

 

Saturday, July 21, 2012

 

MLIVE

Kalamazoo historic preservationists oppose planned demolition of abandoned Noble Lodge at Western Michigan University

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — The clock is ticking on the vacant Noble Lodge building that Western Michigan University plans to tear down at the end of the month, but local preservationists say the historic building has potential for reuse.

 

Buyer beware: Why judge dismissed federal lawsuit against Cooley Law School

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS -- A federal judge today dropped a class action lawsuit against Thomas M. Cooley Law School by former students who alleged they were misled by the school’s post-graduate employment reports.

 

Report shows how risky private loans can be for college students

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- As tuition climbed over the past decade, the number of West Michigan college students taking out private loans to finance their education grew. By the 2008-09 academic year, private loans had grown to their biggest share of total student debt for graduates at many Grand Rapids-area colleges and universities.

 

Friday, July 20, 2012

 

MLIVE

University of Michigan business model is unsustainable, and Mary Sue Coleman is the right leader to change it.

By Phil Power | Bridge Magazine

Mary Sue Coleman is a rock star college president. Since being appointed the 13th president of the University of Michigan in 2002, she has been on a tear, successfully guiding the U of M to ever-increasing stature through very difficult times. The U of M has risen in reputation to No. 18 in the entire world, according to the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings. At the same time, the annual all funds budget for the Ann Arbor campus has risen to $5.8 billion, and its endowment to $7.8 billion (sixth among all 642 U.S. colleges and universities and second among public schools).

 

WMU breaks ground on Legacy Collections Center archive; scheduled for summer 2013 opening

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University Director of Legacy Collections Sharon Carlson jokes she’s become an expert at removing stray bats and birds after working in East Hall, where the WMU Archives and Regional History Collections has been stored for 22 years.

 

Central Michigan University official discusses ways to solve doctor shortage in rural Michigan

By Ron French | Bridge Magazine

Northern Michigan needs to take a gardening approach to solve its shortage of medical services, and grow its own doctors. That’s the advice of Ernie Yoder, dean of the yet-to-open Central Michigan University College of Medicine.

 

GRCC launching new tactic to raise money that doesn't involve tuition

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The Grand Rapids Community College Foundation is making a push to deepen its relationship with alumni, a move it hopes will strengthen ties to the community and boost fundraising.  Administrators say they hope the strategy helps increase annual giving to the foundation from $600,000 to $800,000 in 2015 – donations primarily used for student scholarships and institutional improvements.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

University of Michigan board approves designs for $122M in ongoing construction

University of Michigan regents have approved the design for a $34 million controversial parking structure on Wall Street in lower Ann Arbor. Project architect Neil Martin said he worked "sensitively" with residents concerned about the appearance and safety of the structure, which replaces the Fuller Road structure U-M had planned to build with the city but cancelled earlier this year.

 

David Brandon: $2.8 million, 48-foot-wide Michigan Stadium marquee 'not at all unusual'

The $2.8 million marquee University of Michigan Athletic Director David Brandon plans to install outside the Big House this year will be one of the largest electronic signs in downtown Ann Arbor. The sign will measure 27 feet high and 48 feet wide and will be placed 21 feet off the ground near Michigan Stadium, Brandon told the Board of Regents Thursday.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

Making college affordable: five ways that states, schools are trying to help

Student debt and skyrocketing tuition make headlines. But this week, both Democratic and Republican lawmakers have sought to highlight the silver lining – examples of how states and institutions have been trying to reduce the cost of higher education. “Now more than ever, public higher-education institutions and state officials will need to work together to improve access and performance while spending resources wisely and cutting costs,” said Scott Pattison, executive director of the National Association of State Budget Officers, in a hearing Wednesday held by the House Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training.

 

USA TODAY

Study: Student loans went to people who couldn't repay

By Daniel Wagner, Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Risky lending caused private student loan debt to balloon in the past decade, leaving many Americans struggling to pay off loans that they can't afford, a government study says. Private lenders gave out money without considering whether borrowers would repay, then bundled and resold the loans to investors to avoid losing money when students defaulted, according to the study, which is being released today.

 

Thursday, July 19, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Western Michigan University gets grant for migrant workers program

By Associated Press

Kalamazoo— Western Michigan University has been awarded a $2 million federal grant to support first-year undergraduate students who are migrant or seasonal farm workers or the children of such workers. The Kalamazoo school's Division of Multicultural Affairs recently received its first check from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Migrant Education.

Related story:

> MLIVE: Western Michigan University awarded $2 million federal grant for migrant workers assistance program

 

Kalamazoo College seeks donors to name new fieldhouse, softball field, other athletic amenities

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Kalamazoo College is looking for donors whose names will be carried on various elements of the newly renovated athletics complex — including the 25,000-square-foot field house, a stadium services building and a softball field.

 

See what changes GVSU credits for its record number of graduates

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Like most colleges and universities, having a strong graduation rate has long been a goal of Grand Valley State University. And so far, it’s a goal that GVSU says it’s reaching. When compared with Michigan’s 15 public universities, the university has the fourth best graduation rate. Sixty-one percent of full-time, first-time college students who started at GVSU in fall 2004 had earned a degree by 2010.

 

Michigan universities face hostile financial, political circumstances

By Phil Power

There’s little doubt that our universities are among Michigan’s most valuable and important assets. But real alarm about public higher education is spreading throughout the country -- and threatening profound consequences for our state and it colleges.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Documents: EMU professor denied tenure after 2007 sexual harassment complaints to remain on staff next year

Eastern Michigan University denied tenure to a business professor earlier this year  The denial came in spite of support from the College of Business dean, colleagues and a personnel committee and despite an absence of sexual harassment misconduct by the professor in four and a half years.

 

LOS ANGELES TIMES

UC regents link tuition hikes to Gov. Brown's tax measure

By Larry Gordon

SAN FRANCISCO — Most UC students will get a breather of at least four months without a tuition increase. But then, all bets are off. That's the result of a UC regents vote Wednesday freezing all undergraduate and some graduate school tuition as part of a funding deal with the state Legislature. If Gov. Jerry Brown's tax hike measure on the November ballot fails, however, the regents warned that tuition might rise 20%, or more than $2,400, and that course offerings and library hours could be significantly reduced soon after the election.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Big Data on Campus

By MARC PARRY

CAMPUSES are places of intuition and serendipity: a professor senses confusion on a student’s face and repeats his point; a student majors in psychology after a roommate takes a course; two freshmen meet on the quad and eventually become husband and wife. Now imagine hard data substituting for happenstance.

 

Help for the Not So Needy

By CHRISTOPHER DREW

MIDDLE-INCOME parents are being squeezed more than ever these days — higher property taxes and cost of living, lower home equity, frozen salaries. Many no longer have enough savings and borrowing power to keep up with rising education costs. Consider this run-through of the federal financial-aid form: a family making $75,000 a year might have to pay about $10,000 a year toward the cost of college before qualifying for need-based aid. With income of $150,000, the expected family contribution is $35,000 to $40,000. Student loans loom.

 

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

 

MLIVE

GVSU set new graduation rate record during 2011-12 academic year

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- A record number of students graduated from Grand Valley State University in the 2011-12 academic year, helping the university keep one of the highest graduation rates among Michigan’s 15 public universities, GVSU said.

 

DAILY BEAST

Janitors With College Degrees and the Higher-Education Bubble

Students are paying a bigger share of their college bills, parents are paying less, and families are beginning to turn away from well-known and expensive colleges in favor of cheaper ones, including community colleges or anything near home. So says the 2012 version of Sallie Mae’s annual report, “How America Pays for College,” a collection of dry statistics that nevertheless reflect the rapidly rising anxiety about higher education and whether the cost is worth it.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Help for the Not So Needy

By CHRISTOPHER DREW

MIDDLE-INCOME parents are being squeezed more than ever these days — higher property taxes and cost of living, lower home equity, frozen salaries. Many no longer have enough savings and borrowing power to keep up with rising education costs. Consider this run-through of the federal financial-aid form: a family making $75,000 a year might have to pay about $10,000 a year toward the cost of college before qualifying for need-based aid. With income of $150,000, the expected family contribution is $35,000 to $40,000. Student loans loom.

 

Pledge Prep

By ABIGAIL SULLIVAN MOORE

MARGARET KING of Birmingham, Ala., was at a loss about how to help her older daughter prepare to rush at the University of Virginia. In the South, where sororities have long been a momentous rite of passage, the road to sisterhood is long and not so clearly marked.

 

Plan to Close University of Missouri Press Stirs Anger

By JOHN ELIGON

COLUMBIA, Mo. — A tide of anger has been swelling here since May after the new University of Missouri president, Timothy M. Wolfe, disclosed plans to close the university’s publishing house, stoking arguments over the institution’s priorities and fueling an escalating national debate over the necessity of university presses and their future in the digital world.

 

Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

A few months ago, free online courses from prestigious universities were a rarity. Now, they are the cause for announcements every few weeks, as a field suddenly studded with big-name colleges and competing software platforms evolves with astonishing speed. In a major development on Tuesday, a dozen highly ranked universities said they had signed on with Coursera, a new venture offering free classes online. They still must overcome some skepticism about the quality of online education and the prospects for having the courses cover the costs of producing them, but their enthusiasm is undimmed.

 

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University accepting donations for Seita Scholar students

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI -- Western Michigan University will be collecting donations of basic personal care and dorm room items for its fifth class of Seita Scholars on Tuesday night.

 

Storms put damper on Western Michigan University's ranking in Sunseeker solar car race

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Storms and technical struggles slowed the Western Michigan University Sunseeker solar car racing team on its second day of the cross-country race on Sunday.

 

Check out Kalamazoo College's renovated athletic fields, scheduled for Aug. 10 completion

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – A Kalamazoo College mascot hornet is already painted on the synthetic turf  recently laid on the new Angell Field, which is one of many changes included in the college’s $16 million athletic complex renovation project.

Related story:

> MLIVE: Kalamazoo College's new fieldhouse aims to be most efficient on building campus

 

CMU uses $6.1 million in reserves to fund $442 million budget

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — To fund this year’s $442 million budget, Central Michigan University administrators dug in to the school’s reserve accounts. CMU leaders at Thursday''s Board of Trustees meeting budgeted $6.1 million from the contingency fund to make up for a decrease in enrollment and a $1 million shortfall. President George Ross described it as one-time use, Central Michigan Life reported.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

U-M football 2013: Expect a $2.8 million marquee outside Michigan Stadium

Those driving by the Big House next year can expect a landscape change: University of Michigan Athletic Director David Brandon is seeking approval to install a $2.8 million electronic marquee that can be viewed from Stadium Boulevard. The marquee would be located in the space between Michigan Stadium, Crisler Center and Stadium Boulevard and would have both video and audio capabilities.

 

Next steps for $122M in construction projects before University of Michigan regents on Thursday

The University of Michigan is looking to increase the budget for an addition to its Institute of Social Research by $6 million, bringing the total cost to $29 million. The additional money expands the scope of the project to include a 56,700-square-foot addition, up from the 44,700 square feet proposed in 2010.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Universities Reshaping Education on the Web

By TAMAR LEWIN

As part of a seismic shift in online learning that is reshaping higher education, Coursera, a year-old company founded by two Stanford University computer scientists, will announce on Tuesday that a dozen major research universities are joining the venture. In the fall, Coursera will offer 100 or more free massive open online courses, or MOOCs, that are expected to draw millions of students and adult learners globally.

 

USA TODAY

Some vets feeling shorted by the Army College Fund

By Mary Beth Marklein, and Polina Marinova

At the time, the deal seemed irresistible to Eric Hickam: Give six years to the Army, a recruiter told him in 2003, and you can get a $50,000 "kicker" — the Army College Fund. When his payments started coming last fall, his first year at Columbia University in New York City, the amount fell far short of what Hickam had anticipated. He thought the college fund was a bonus on top of his GI Bill, worth about $35,000 at the time. The Army says the $50,000 figure was a total of all benefits. Last month, it denied Hickam's appeal seeking $50,000 more than what he's receiving for his GI Bill.

 

Monday, July 16, 2012

 

USA TODAY

Students, families, seek ways to trim college costs

By Christine Dugas

The skyrocketing cost of tuition and tough economic times are forcing American families to cut back on college spending. As families retrench, they are getting more creative in how they pay for tuition, student loan provider Sallie Mae found in a study that it's releasing today. "Two years ago, families went into their piggy banks and took dollars out of different reserves" for college spending, says Clifford Young, managing director of Ipsos Public Affairs, the market research firm that conducted the study. "Now they are counting pennies with much more vigor."

 

Sunday, July 15, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

EMU president not bashful about getting involved

When Eastern Michigan University President Susan Martin responded to regents who were concerned about her drinking, she said that she is a "hands-on" president, who will jump on the marching band platform, be on call with police and even rappel down one of the university's buildings. Martin indeed trained with the university's Reserve Officers' Training Corps and rappelled 60 feet down Roosevelt Hall in October 2011.

Related story:

> DETROIT NEWS: Police: EMU president Martin expected ride home

 

MLIVE

GVSU leaders explain why they decided to increase average tuition bill $362 next school year

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- Despite a $2.8 million boost in state funding, Grand Valley State University said a slight tuition increase for the 2012-13 academic year is needed to continue to provide students with a top-notch education. Hiking the amount students pay in tuition by $362 a year – or 3.7 percent – is necessary because the university is contending with expenses related to inflation, new academic programs and increased student enrollment, said Matt McLogan, GVSU’s vice president for university relations.

 

WMU to break ground on Legacy Collections Center on July 19

By Ursula Zerilli

KALMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University will break ground on construction of a new facility for its historical archives at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 19. The Legacy Collections Center will be a 16,000 square-foot building housing historical university records, regional and local government documents, manuscripts, oral histories, photographic collections, census records, books, magazines and the recently donated Kalamazoo Gazette newspaper archive.

 

OAKLAND PRESS

Former Oakland University provost already finding positives as president of Lawrence Tech

By DIANA DILLABER MURRAY

SOUTHFIELD — Virinder Moudgil served as provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at Oakland University for almost a dozen years, but it has taken him no time to take up the mantle and the bragging rights as president of Lawrence Technological University. “One of the highest buildings in the world is going up in Shanghai, China and that building is being designed by a Lawrence Technological University graduate of architecture,” said Moudgil, who was selected by the LTU Board of Trustees after a national search.

 

Friday, July 13, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Court sides with Wayne State over revoked degree

By Associated Press

Detroit — A former Wayne State University student has failed to convince an appeals court that the school violated her rights when it revoked her degree. Hanna Jaber received a doctorate in education in 2008. But the degree was taken away after officials ran her dissertation through software and found parts of it had been plagiarized.

 

EMU prez must come clean on drinking

By Frank Beckmann

Eastern Michigan University, host of an annual "Ethos Week," a weeklong exploration of ethical issues, is now hoping that its leader marks the occasion with more than a rhetorical exercise. But after President Susan Martin's response to public disclosure of her threatened dismissal, it's fair to wonder if that's a realistic possibility.

 

MLIVE

Grand Valley State University approves 3.7 percent tuition increase

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Grand Valley State University’s Board of Trustees today approved a 3.7 percent tuition increase for the 2012-13 academic year. The increase, which was unanimously approved by the board, will bring the tuition rate for a full-time, incoming student to $181 per-semester. That makes the annual price of classes $10,078.

 

Western Michigan University professor to lead international physics journal

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – A Western Michigan University associate professor has been named senior editor of a international journal in the field of teaching and researching physics. Charles Henderson, an associate professor of physics and science education, will be making editorial decisions for the Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, according to the university.

 

U.S. Education Department: Percentage of Michigan residents with college degrees rises slightly, but must climb higher

By Dave Murray

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – The number of Michigan residents between 25 and 34 with a college degree is up slightly, but U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says the state – and nation – have far to go to meet goals.

 

Despite GRCC hiring freeze, 36 positions may be filled

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Administrators at Grand Rapids Community College say they don’t expect a recently implemented hiring freeze to affect plans to make three-dozen temporary faculty positions permanent during the 2012-13 academic year.

 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

University of Illinois criticized after contract raises conflict of interest concerns

By Ray Long and Jodi S. Cohen

The University of Illinois handed out a $4.6 million contract to an architectural firm partially owned by the husband of a key administrator who oversees the planning of campus construction projects.

 

WASHINGTON POST

Abuse on campus: Will Florida A&M death bring crackdown on hazing?

By Stacy Teicher Khadaroo

The resignation of Florida A&M University (FAMU) President James Ammons Wednesday once again throws a spotlight on the question of how much campus leaders should do in response to hazing. FAMU was targeted Wednesday in a wrongful-death lawsuit by the family of Robert Champion, which alleges that university officials knew of a dangerous hazing culture before the drum major died in November after a beating ritual on a bus of the famed Marching 100 band.

 

Thursday, July 12, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

EMU president will give her raise to alcohol awareness fund, get counseling

By David Jesse

Eastern Michigan University President Susan Martin will seek counseling, she announced Wednesday, a day after it was revealed that university regents had warned her to curtail her drinking in public or risk being fired. Martin also pledged to donate her raise this year to a campus alcohol-awareness fund. She currently makes $292,125, EMU spokesman Geoff Larcom said, and her planned raise was to be $8,764.

Related stories:

> DETROIT NEWS: EMU's Martin agrees to get counseling

> ANNARBOR.COM: Emails shed light on argument between EMU President Susan Martin and alumnus

> ANNARBOR.COM: EMU President Susan Martin will donate raise to campus alcohol education fund and get counseling

 

DETROIT NEWS

Florida A&M president resigns in wake of hazing scandal

By Gary Fineout, Associated Press

Tallahassee, Fla. — Florida A&M President James Ammons has resigned the same day parents of a drum major who died after being hazed added the university to a wrongful death lawsuit. Ammons resigned Wednesday in a letter to the university governing board. The resignation takes effect Oct. 11.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: President of Florida A&M Resigns as Parents of Hazing Victim File Lawsuit

 

MLIVE

Ferris State University approves $2.2 million in campus housing repairs

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- The Ferris State University Board of Trustees today approved up to $2.2 million to help upgrade campus housing, the university said.

 

Contract extension for Ferris State University President David Eisler includes pay increase and potential bonuses

By Brian McVicar

BIG RAPIDS, MI -- The Ferris State University Board of Trustees says President David Eisler is leading the university in the right direction, and they’re hoping a pay raise and the promise of bonuses will keep him on the job for several more years.

 

CMU, Michigan Tech partner to offer doctor of physical therapy program in Upper Peninsula

By Lindsay Knake

MOUNT PLEASANT, MI — Students at Michigan Technological University interested in studying physical therapy have a new opportunity. The Houghton-based school has partnered with Central Michigan University to offer CMU's doctor of physical therapy program for a cohort of 12 students.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Oxford Gets Major Donation for Student Aid

By D. D. GUTTENPLAN

LONDON — The spires of the historic University of Oxford have been forbidding to many of Britain’s poorer families, even before the government tripled tuition fees at the end of 2010 in an austerity measure that prompted days of violent protests. But on Wednesday, Oxford announced a $115 million donation from an alumnus, a major Silicon Valley venture capitalist, as the cornerstone of a $460 million fund dedicated to reducing the prospect of fearsome debt for the disadvantaged who manage to enter its elite doors. The first 100 scholarships are to be awarded in the fall, when the higher fees will begin to bite.

 

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

EMU board puts president on notice after argument at a bar

By David Jesse

After the last two Eastern Michigan University presidents were forced out under clouds of scandal, current President Susan Martin was seen by many as a stabilizing force on the Ypsilanti campus often roiled by controversy. Then the news broke Tuesday that the university's board warned her in May to curtail her drinking in public or risk being fired. "My friends and I are shocked by this," said EMU alumnus Meredith Washington, 43, of Ann Arbor. "She was doing such a good job of helping EMU grow and move on from all the problems the previous guys had. I hope this is just an isolated event. It would be horrible to have another scandal there."

Related stories:

> DETROIT NEWS: EMU to president: Deal with drinking or be fired

> ANNARBOR.COM: EMU Board of Regents letter to President Susan Martin and her response

> ANNARBOR.COM: Susan Martin controversy: Conversation about EMU's former Huron logo sparked 'a little miscommunication,' alumnus says

> ANNARBOR.COM: EMU union overwhelmingly votes down contract, puts message in sky: 'President Martin unfair to clericals'

 

MLIVE

Push for merit pay and budget cuts help GRCC’s bottom line, but difficult times lie ahead

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- President Steven Ender has improved the culture at Grand Rapids Community College by trimming expenses and pushing for performance-based pay, but the college still faces challenging financial circumstances. That was the verdict of GRCC’s Board of Trustees, who met Tuesday to discuss its role and goals for the college.

 

WMU trombonist Eric Bowman wins international competition in Paris

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – Western Michigan University graduating senior Eric Bowman says putting his nerves to rest and enjoying the music is what helped him bring home an international trombone soloist first-place award in Paris last Saturday. Bowman, a 23-year-old from Portage, won the Frank Smith Trombone Solo Competition, the International Trombone Festival's classical trombone division for students up to age 25.

 

Why the new chair of GVSU's Honors College wants to focus on entrepreneurship

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- During the past 15 years, Bill Holsinger-Robinson has worked as an Internet entrepreneur, overseen an international art competition and advised start-up businesses. Now, the Holland resident has a new job to put on his resume: college administrator. He started work last week as the endowed chair of the Frederik Meijer Honors College at Grand Valley State University.

 

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

 

MLIVE

Western Michigan University renovated Lee Honors College offers students tech-savvy learning labs, outdoor classroom

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI — The Western Michigan University Lee Honors College will celebrate its 50th anniversary in a newly renovated building this year with new tech-savvy learning labs and an outdoor classroom.

 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

Got student debt? Move fast, and some cities will help you pay it off.

By Kimberly Railey

College graduates steeped in debt have an unexpected ally to combat their student loans: local governments. But there’s a hitch – they’ll have to live in towns that might not boast the vitality and jobs of urban centers like Chicago and New York City. In coming months, Niagara Falls, N.Y., will strive to lure young professionals to its languishing downtown by offering to help pay their student loans. In rural Kansas, income tax waivers and student loan repayments are being marketed to entice college graduates. And Nebraska, heeding Kansas’ blueprint, may consider a similar relocation proposal in its 2012 legislative session.

 

Monday, July 9, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

University board members who voted 'no' on tuition hikes speak up

By David Jesse

The vexation felt for years by many Michigan parents and students over repeated tuition rate increases has started to bubble up among some members of the elected governing boards of the state's largest public universities.

 

ANNARBOR.COM

EMU nearing completion on $1.8 million Hoyt Hall renovation project

Eastern Michigan University is nearing completion on its $1.8 million renovation of one of its residence halls, Hoyt Hall. Hoyt had been used for “swing space” by faculty members and staff during the renovation period of the university’s largest classroom building, Pray-Harrold. The $42 million project of the 42-year-old building took 16 months to complete. Since fiscal year 2009, EMU has spent nearly $19.5 million on energy efficient residence hall renovations that were funded through the auxiliary capital spending budget, which is paid for through housing and dining fees.

 

Sunday, July 8, 2012

 

ANNARBOR.COM

North Campus Research Complex after 3 years and $200M: 'Are we making the most of the opportunity?'

The University of Michigan bought the Pfizer property at 1600 Huron Parkway in Ann Arbor three years ago. It will have invested $300 million in the facility over a six year period. In fact, the dean of the University of Michigan medical school was quite the opposite, leading a contingent of college officials that thought purchasing the 2.2-million-square-foot Pfizer complex was a smart, albeit aggressive, move.

 

Saturday, July 7, 2012

 

DETROIT FREE PRESS

It's time to forgive student loans, U.S. Rep. Hansen Clarke says

By David Jesse

President Barack Obama signed a law Friday extending a cap on federal Stafford student loan interest rates -- but U.S. Rep. Hansen Clarke, a Detroit Democrat, argues it doesn't go far enough. He's hoping the more than 1 million people who have signed a petition supporting a bill he's championing will force Congress to make more meaningful reforms to the student loan system.

 

Friday, July 6, 2012

 

MLIVE

Michigan State University's Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies officially merged into WMU School of Medicine

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – The employees and staff at Michigan State University’s Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies are now officially considered faculty of Western Michigan University’s School of Medicine.

 

GVSU to change how its celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day

By Brian McVicar

ALLENDALE, MI -- In an effort to make it easier for students to celebrate one of the defining leaders of the civil rights movement, Grand Valley State University has announced that it will cancel classes on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

 

Thursday, July 5, 2012

 

ANNARBOR.COM

Increasing demand in health care prompts EMU to add physician assistant master's program

Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti has announced it will be adding a master’s degree program for physician assistants in response to the anticipated shortages in primary care providers in the coming years because of health care reform and aging baby boomers. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is said to extend insurance coverage to more than 30 million Americans - and the vast majority of its tenets were upheld last week in a Supreme Court ruling.

 

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

 

DETROIT NEWS

Calvin College's new president describes how he'll spend first months in office

By Brian McVicar

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Michael Le Roy took over as president of Calvin College this week, meeting with faculty members and laying out his plans for his first months in office. “There’s a lot of details to learn,” said Le Roy, who was officially hired to lead Calvin last month by the Christian Reformed Church of North America. “I know higher education; I’ve been in higher ed for a long time. But to try and learn about the Calvin culture and the way the Calvin community operates is really my primary focus.”

 

WMU Sunseeker solar car team heating up for cross-country race

By Ursula Zerilli

KALAMAZOO, MI – A dozen Western Michigan University students will be doing more than soaking up the sun this month as they depart on a collegiate road-trip race across the country in a solar car they built and maintain.

 

Michigan State FRIB project passes federal review

By Brandon Howell

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University has cleared another hurdle on the path to fruition. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has announced that the FRIB passed the agency’s Office of Project Assessment review from earlier this year. The report confirms FRIB has met all expectations to date and is ready for the next phase of the project.

 

NEW YORK TIMES

After Revolt, a Dean at Columbia Steps Down

By ARIEL KAMINER

A Columbia University dean who expanded the school’s engineering programs but was the object of a protracted rebellion by members of his faculty has resigned, the school said on Tuesday. The dean, Feniosky Peña-Mora, was a high-profile addition to the faculty when he was hired to run Columbia’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science in 2009. A charismatic scholar who won acclaim here and in his native Dominican Republic, he rose swiftly through American academia.

 

Monday, July 2, 2012

 

HUFFINGTON POST

For-Profit College Regulations Struck Down In Part By Federal Judge

A federal judge has struck down central parts of hotly debated new federal regulations meant to rein in for-profit colleges that often leave students saddled with debts they cannot repay. In a ruling released on Saturday, U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras invalidated parts of the Obama administration's so-called gainful employment regulations, ruling that the Department of Education "failed to provide a reasoned explanation" in arriving at guidelines to assess students' ability to pay down loans after attending a career training program.

Related story:

> NEW YORK TIMES: Judge Strikes Main Element of For-Profit College Rules

 

DETROIT NEWS

Students survive 'zombie apocalypse'

By Associated Press

Dozens of Michigan State University students survived a zombie pandemic this summer. Or at least a class about one. For the past seven weeks, Glenn Stutzky, an instructor in the School of Social Work, taught a course not previously offered at the East Lansing university. Called "Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse — Catastrophes and Human Behavior," the online class encouraged students to consider how human behavior and nature change after catastrophes, both historical and hypothetical.

 

Saturday, June 30, 2012

 

NEW YORK TIMES

Congress Approves a $127 Billion Transportation and Student Loan Package

By JONATHAN WEISMAN

Congress gave final approval on Friday to legislation that combines a two-year transportation measure with bills to extend subsidized student loans and revamp federal flood insurance, wrapping up a bruising session with measures that will be popular on the campaign trail. The final $127 billion package angered fiscal conservatives and liberal environmentalists alike, but leaders in both parties — along with many rank-and-file lawmakers — wanted to put the issues behind them. Exhausted members of both parties pointed to the legislation as a tonic for the ailing job market, as well as proof that an unpopular Congress could get something done. The House passed it by 373 to 52, the Senate by 74 to 19. All the no votes were by Republicans.

Related stories:

> DETROIT FREE PRESS: Students get a 1-year reprieve on college loans

> MLIVE: What 'a one-year quick fix' on college loans means for students

 

Governor Reappoints Trustee Who Ousted University President

By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA

The governor of Virginia on Friday reappointed the University of Virginia trustee who played the lead role in ousting the university president, a move that was reversed this week. Gov. Bob McDonnell has been careful not to take a position on the removal of Teresa A. Sullivan as president by the university’s governing board, the Board of Visitors. But he, like many others, has sharply criticized the way the board and its leader, or rector, Helen E. Dragas, handled the change.

 

N.Y.U. Plan to Expand Has Critic in Neighborhood Star

By VIVIAN YEE