Education news briefing for Wednesday, March 27 2019.

 

Must reads

 

What will it take to boost school funding? Detroiters want to know. There’s no shortage of debate over Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s proposed education budget. Some Detroiters just want to know when it will end. “We’ve been put on the back burner,” said America Yahya, 20, who attended charter schools in Detroit throughout her childhood. She, like most everyone at a forum in Detroit on Monday about Whitmer’s budget, does not doubt for a minute that schools need more money. The question that some in the audience were asking on Monday was more practical, if not easier to solve: What will it take? Chalkbeat

 

Michigan

 

Michigan's new cyberbullying law about to take effect: What to know: A new law takes effect in Michigan this week that takes aim at cyberbullying, including hefty fines and jail time for violators convicted of online harassment. Per the new law, it is illegal to cyberbully another person and someone found guilty of the misdemeanor could face a maximum of 93 days in jail, a max fine of $500 or both. But if a violator has a prior conviction, they could face up to a year in jail, and/or a max $1,000 fine.  Someone who violates the new law and displays "a continued pattern of harassing or intimidating behavior" that causes serious injury to the victim could face a felony that carries a maximum 5-year sentence and/or a $5,000 fine. Detroit Free Press

 

Metro Detroit

 

More fallout from emergency management: A tiny city inside Detroit is looking for a new charter operator: The tiny Highland Park School District has already been through the wringer. Now its sole remaining school is bracing for another major disruption. Frustrated with the for-profit charter operator that runs the schools, district leaders are considering proposals from other operators. Highland Park is a three-square-mile enclave, an island within the city of Detroit, and its school system has been subjected to many of the same forces that plague Detroit schools: declining enrollment, mismanagement, a revolving cast of state-appointed emergency managers. Chalkbeat

 

Measles outbreak in Oakland County jumps to 18 cases, new list of exposure places released: The Oakland County measles outbreak has now jumped to 18 confirmed cases, and state health officials have released a new list of sites in the community where people may have been exposed to the highly-contagious disease. The cases have been confirmed in Oakland county since March 13, the county health division and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services said Monday night. An effort to get more people protected against the disease had meant 970 new vaccinations since March 22. MLive

 

College and university

 

Where Do Colleges Recruit? Wealthy and White High Schools: The scandal in college admissions has focused attention not just on alleged illegal activities involving bribery and fraud, but also on the many legal advantages enjoyed by applicants who are more wealthy and more likely to be white than are those in the population at large.A report being issued today suggests that leading public universities contribute in a significant way to these advantages with their recruitment of out-of-state students -- and, to some extent, with their lack of recruitment of in-state students as well. The report focuses on the high schools at which public universities recruit outside their state. The study finds that these high schools are more likely than not to be high income and largely white. Further, a disproportionate number of the high schools visited are private schools. Inside Higher Ed

 

Several coaches plead not guilty in college admissions bribery scandal: Several former athletic coaches and others accused of participating in the college admissions cheating and bribery scandal pleaded not guilty to racketeering conspiracy charges Monday. The developments here in federal court came nearly two weeks after prosecutors announced charges resulting from an investigation of an alleged plot to compromise the admissions process at several prominent universities. Prosecutors charge that wealthy parents bankrolled a bribery scam to get their children into schools including Yale, Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Southern California. Washington Post

 

National

 

Making School a Safe Haven, Not a Fortress: Big, airy windows that allow for clear views of the street and plenty of natural light. Meditation rooms. Koi pounds. Carpet that resembles prairie grass to evoke a sense of nature. A centrally-located school counseling office. Those touchy-feely sounding features probably aren't the first ones that spring to mind when you imagine designing schools to thwart or mitigate future school shootings and other physical threats. But they can bolster student safety, well-being, and even learning—all without making students feel like they are going to school in a fortress, say architects who have spent years designing building to improve school safety. Education Week

 

 

Education news briefing for Tuesday, March 26, 2019.

 

Must reads

 

Michigan students catch a break on testing schedule due to snow day delays: The effects of the extraordinary number of snow days that hit Michigan schools this past winter are still being felt. Many districts reached out to the Michigan Department of Education, asking for extensions on the spring statewide testing windows. School district leaders said the severe weather closings created delays in the student instruction calendars. Today the MDE agreed, to a point. An extension of one week, for this year only, has been granted for the M-STEP, MI-ACCESS and Early Literacy test periods. Those are the only delays that will be allowed. WLNS

 

Michigan

 

Big Brothers Big Sisters turns to the workplace to find mentors with Bigs in Business: Jonathon Michaud and Adam Kingston's first stop on Wednesday was a career day event for high school sophomores, even though Michaud is an eighth grader at Springfield Middle School. After that, Kingston brought Jonathon to Cafe Rica, where they spent time talking and playing Uno. Mostly, Jonathon won. “We bond over competition, friendly competition,” said Kingston, who is Jonathon's mentor with the Big Brothers Big Sisters program in Battle Creek. Battle Creek Enquirer

 

Metro Detroit

 

Representatives, students commemorate March for Our Lives protest: High school students gathered Sunday in Midtown in Detroit to remember  protests a year ago to support safer schools, including making clean water available and stopping gun violence.About 100 people, including students who helped organize the March for Our Lives protest and school walkouts and Democratic U.S. Reps. Rashida Tlaib and Andy Levin, gathered in Cass Corridor Commons, many sharing stories about issues affecting students and the pushback from adults and their peers who disagreed with holding walkouts. Detroit News

 

College and university

 

The Two Sides of the Free-Speech ‘Crisis,’ in One Fox News Broadcast: Two major arguments have emerged in recent years as to the true nature of the campus free-speech "crisis." Many conservatives have long argued that liberal criticism of controversial speakers chills the climate for speech. Some liberals and academics counter that professors who've become the targets of the right-wing news media for their speech are the real victims. In her Fox News show on Thursday, Laura Ingraham managed to demonstrate both sides of the debate in the span of half an hour. Chronicle of Higher Education

 

National

 

Indiana Teachers Shot With Plastic Pellets in Active-Shooter Drill, Raising Concerns: In an active-shooter training, Indiana elementary teachers were asked to kneel down and face a classroom wall before being shot, execution-style, with plastic pellets by local law enforcement. Terrified teachers were screaming during the exercise, which left them with welts and bruises, according to the Indiana State Teachers Association, which testified about the experience to lawmakers this week. State legislators are considering a school-safety bill that, among other things, would require schools to conduct at least one active-shooter drill each school year. The bill has already passed the state House, and is now being considered by the Senate. Education Week

 

 

Education news briefing for Monday, March 25, 2019.

 

Must reads

 

Elon Musk tells Flint students to push their creative limits: If you’re curious about something, give it a try. As photos of Elon Musk flashed onto a screen inside the Doyle-Ryder Elementary School gymnasium Friday morning, the Space X and Tesla CEO spoke to students about how he got interested in the field of engineering. Born in South Africa, the 47-year-old Musk said he enjoyed putting together model airplanes, rockets and radios. He also admitted he liked blowing things up. Musk saw engineering as “the closest thing to magic that exists in the real world.” MLive

 

Michigan

 

Saginaw school board spends $7,084 for tablets to do business without paper: Saginaw Public School District Board of Education has approved spending about $7,000 to buy tablet computers for board members to conduct their business. The board voted unanimously to buy seven Microsoft Surface Pro tablets. President Ruth Ann Knapp said the measure eventually will save the district money because of the savings on paper use. Board members chose tablets because they are light weight, only weighing around two pounds. MLive

 

Metro Detroit

 

Detroit students will get jump start on learning if the board agrees to begin classes in August: Classes would begin before Labor Day for the coming school year in the Detroit school district — part of a proposal that would mark the first time in years students in the district would head back to class in August. It’s a big shift in the district for a number of reasons. It could disrupt the late August vacation plans of teachers and parents and mean a shorter summer break for students. But it could result in a jump start on learning, and align Detroit with a growing number of school districts and charter schools statewide starting early. Chalkbeat

 

College and university

 

Dear Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman: You wasted your money: Dear Lori Loughlin, Felicity Huffman and other rich parents who got their children into selective colleges with bribes: Let me explain something to you. I went to Harvard, which accepts only 5 percent of applicants. I confess that when I opened the acceptance letter, I thought great wealth and power would soon be mine. So why have I spent my life being ordered around by people who attended less-selective schools? I’m not complaining. I love my work. But I have always wondered why smart people like you assume getting into an Ivy League school, or its equivalent, guarantees success. Washington Post

 

National

 

As College Consulting Expands, Are High School Counselors Advocates or Adversaries? High school counselors are often students’ biggest advocates, whether guiding teenagers through depression or the stress of SAT tests and college essays. But in the federal investigation of corrupt admissions practices unveiled last week, some were seen as obstacles to be pushed aside. The F.B.I. affidavit revealed how wealthy parents and William Singer, a private admissions consultant, lied to counselors about why students planned to take the SAT and ACT in far-flung locations, where bribed proctors would correct their answers. New York Times

 

 

 

 

University of Detroit Jesuit, Detroit, Michigan
Brother Rice High School, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.
Charyl Stockwell Preparatory Academy, Brighton, Michigan
Notre Dame Preparatory, Pontiac, Michigan
Birmingham Public Schools, Birmingham, Michigan
Westwood Community School District, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Inkster, Michigan
The Roeper School, Birmingham and Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Cranbrook Schools, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Marian High School, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Academy of the Sacred Heart, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Mercy High School, Farmington Hills, Michigan
Regina High School, Warren, Michigan
Grosse Pointe Public School System, Grosse Pointe, Michigan
Oakland Schools Technical Campuses, Oakland County, Michigan
Bloomfield Hills Schools, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Comprehensive education at its finest.
Everest Collegiate High School and Academy. Clarkston, Michigan. An Authentic Catholic School of Distinction.
Lincoln Consolidated Schools, Ypsilanti, Michigan
Virtual Learning Academy Consortium, Michigan
Loyola High School, Detroit, Michigan.
Oakland Christian School, Auburn Hills, Michigan. Oakland Christian School engages students in a rigorous and relevant education
Greenhills School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Academic foundation for success.
Utica Community Schools, Image the Potential.
Lake Orion Community Schools, Lake Orion, Michigan. Providing an exemplary education for all learners
Shrine Catholic Schools, Royal Oak, Michigan. Faith. Family. Future.
Lindamood-Bell Academy, Birmingham and Ann Arbor, Michigan
AIM High School, Farmington Hills, Michigan. Aim High is a 6th-12th grade, tuition-based private school that provides an educational alternative
Parkway Christian School, Sterling Heights, Michigan. Challenging Minds. Capturing Hearts. Cultivating Gifts.
Plymouth Christian, Canton, Michigan. A non-denominational, college preparatory Christian school
Berkley School District, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Oak Park, Michigan. Engage. Inspire. Achieve.
Virtual Learning Academy Consortium, Michigan
Oakland Accelerated College Experience, Oakland County, Michigan
Oakland Opportunity Academy, Oakland County, Michigan